No. 13

STATE OF MICHIGAN

Journal of the Senate

102nd Legislature

REGULAR SESSION OF 2024

 

 

 

 

 

Senate Chamber, Lansing, Tuesday, February 13, 2024.

 

10:00 a.m.

 

 

The Senate was called to order by the President pro tempore, Senator Jeremy Moss.

 

The roll was called by the Secretary of the Senate, who announced that a quorum was present.

 

 

Albert用resent Hauck用resent Moss用resent

Anthony用resent Hertel用resent Nesbitt用resent

Bayer用resent Hoitenga用resent Outman用resent

Bellino用resent Huizenga用resent Polehanki用resent

Brinks用resent Irwin用resent Runestad用resent

Bumstead用resent Johnson用resent Santana用resent

Camilleri用resent Klinefelt用resent Shink用resent

Cavanagh用resent Lauwers用resent Singh用resent

Chang用resent Lindsey用resent Theis用resent

Cherry用resent McBroom用resent Victory用resent

Daley用resent McCann用resent Webber用resent

Damoose用resent McDonald Rivet用resent Wojno用resent

Geiss用resent McMorrow用resent


 

Senator Sean McCann of the 19th District offered the following invocation:

Kindness葉he universal language that transcends boundaries, possesses the remarkable ability to shape destinies. As we interact with the myriad souls that cross our path today, let us infuse our words and deeds with the authentic hue of kindness. In doing so, may we elevate spirits, dissolve barriers, and scatter seeds of positivity that have a potential to flourish and transform.

 

The President pro tempore, Senator Moss, led the members of the Senate in recital of the Pledge of Allegiance.

 

Senator Nesbitt entered the Senate Chamber.

 

 

Motions and Communications

 

 

Senator Lauwers moved that Senator Johnson be temporarily excused from today痴 session.

The motion prevailed.

 

Senator Singh moved that Senator Geiss be temporarily excused from today痴 session.

The motion prevailed.

 

 

The following communications were received and read:

Office of the Auditor General

February 6, 2024

Enclosed is a copy of the following reports:

腹 Report on Internal Control, Compliance, and Other Matters of the State of Michigan 401K Plan (071‑0156-24).

腹 Report on Internal Control, Compliance, and Other Matters of the State of Michigan 457 Plan (071‑0157-24).

 

February 9, 2024

Enclosed is a copy of the following report:

腹 Report on Internal Control, Compliance, and Other Matters of the Michigan Legislative Retirement System (900-0140-24).

Sincerely,

Doug Ringler

Auditor General

The audit reports were referred to the Committee on Oversight.

 

 

The following communications were received:

Office of Senator Edward W. McBroom

February 1, 2024

Per Senate Rule 1.110(c), I am requesting that my name be added as a co-sponsor to SJR G introduced on September 23, 2023 by Senator Michael Webber.

 

February 6, 2024

Per Senate Rule 1.110(c), I am requesting that my name be added as a co-sponsor to SB 686 introduced on January 11, 2024 by Senator Sean McCann.

 

February 6, 2024

Per Senate Rule 1.110(c), I am requesting that my name be added as a co-sponsor to SB 696 introduced on January 25, 2024 by Senator Michele Hoitenga.

 

February 6, 2024

Per Senate Rule 1.110(c), I am requesting that my name be added as a co-sponsor to SB 697 introduced on January 25, 2024 by Senator Roger Hauck.

February 6, 2024

Per Senate Rule 1.110(c), I am requesting that my name be added as a co-sponsor to SBs 698 and 699 introduced on February 1, 2024 by Senator Mark Huizenga.

 

February 6, 2024

Per Senate Rule 1.110(c), I am requesting that my name be added as a co-sponsor to SB 706 introduced on February 6, 2024 by Senator Veronica Klinefelt.

Sincerely,

Ed McBroom

State Senator

38th District

The communications were referred to the Secretary for record.

 

 

Recess

 

 

Senator Singh moved that the Senate recess subject to the call of the Chair.

The motion prevailed, the time being 10:03 a.m.

 

11:01 a.m.

 

The Senate was called to order by the President pro tempore, Senator Moss.

 

During the recess, Senators Geiss and Johnson entered the Senate Chamber.

 

By unanimous consent the Senate proceeded to the order of

Introduction and Referral of Bills

 

 

Senators Runestad, Johnson, Bellino, McBroom, Lindsey, Outman, Bumstead, Damoose, Huizenga, Daley and Nesbitt introduced

Senate Bill No. 717, entitled

A bill to amend 1978 PA 368, entitled 撤ublic health code, by amending sections 21702 and 21703 (MCL 333.21702 and 333.21703), section 21702 as amended by 1994 PA 73 and section 21703 as amended by 2015 PA 155, and by adding sections 21788, 21788a, 21788b, 21788c, 21788d, 21788e, 21788f, 21788g, 21788h, and 21788i.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Housing and Human Services.

 

 

Senator Singh introduced

Senate Bill No. 718, entitled

A bill to amend 1949 PA 300, entitled 溺ichigan vehicle code, by amending section 805 (MCL 257.805), as amended by 2021 PA 96.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

 

 

House Bill No. 4028, entitled

A bill to amend 1949 PA 300, entitled 溺ichigan vehicle code, by amending section 722 (MCL 257.722), as amended by 2018 PA 274.

The House of Representatives has passed the bill and ordered that it be given immediate effect.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.

 

 

House Bill No. 4613, entitled

A bill to amend 1978 PA 368, entitled 撤ublic health code, by amending section 20952 (MCL 333.20952), as added by 1990 PA 179.

The House of Representatives has passed the bill and ordered that it be given immediate effect.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Veterans and Emergency Services.

House Bill No. 4614, entitled

A bill to amend 1978 PA 368, entitled 撤ublic health code, (MCL 333.1101 to 333.25211) by adding section 20952a.

The House of Representatives has passed the bill and ordered that it be given immediate effect.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Veterans and Emergency Services.

 

By unanimous consent the Senate returned to the order of

General Orders

 

 

Senator Singh moved that the Senate resolve itself into the Committee of the Whole for consideration of the General Orders calendar.

The motion prevailed, and the President pro tempore, Senator Moss, designated Senator Klinefelt as Chairperson.

After some time spent therein, the Committee arose; and the President pro tempore, Senator Moss, having resumed the Chair, the Committee reported back to the Senate, favorably and without amendment, the following bills:

House Bill No. 4824, entitled

A bill to amend 1994 PA 451, entitled 哲atural resources and environmental protection act, by amending section 20120a (MCL 324.20120a), as amended by 2018 PA 581.

 

 

House Bill No. 4825, entitled

A bill to amend 1986 PA 182, entitled 鉄tate police retirement act of 1986, by amending section 66 (MCL 38.1666), as added by 2018 PA 674.

 

 

House Bill No. 4826, entitled

A bill to amend 1969 PA 306, entitled 鄭dministrative procedures act of 1969, by amending sections 33, 39a, 41, 42, 43, 44, 47, and 48 (MCL 24.233, 24.239a, 24.241, 24.242, 24.243, 24.244, 24.247, and 24.248), as amended by 2018 PA 267; and to repeal acts and parts of acts.

 

 

House Bill No. 4325, entitled

A bill to amend 1994 PA 451, entitled 哲atural resources and environmental protection act, by amending section 8905a (MCL 324.8905a), as amended by 2014 PA 549.

The bills were placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

 

By unanimous consent the Senate returned to the order of

Third Reading of Bills

 

 

Senator Singh moved that the Senate proceed to consideration of the following bill:

Senate Bill No. 465

The motion prevailed.

 

 

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 465, entitled

A bill to amend 1949 PA 300, entitled 溺ichigan vehicle code, (MCL 257.1 to 257.923) by adding section 643b.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

 

 

Roll Call No. 10 Yeas38

 

 

Albert Daley Lauwers Polehanki

Anthony Damoose Lindsey Runestad

Bayer Geiss McBroom Santana

Bellino Hauck McCann Shink

Brinks Hertel McDonald Rivet Singh

Bumstead Hoitenga McMorrow Theis

Camilleri Huizenga Moss Victory

Cavanagh Irwin Nesbitt Webber

Chang Johnson Outman Wojno

Cherry Klinefelt

 

 

Nays0

 

 

Excused0

 

 

Not Voting0

 

 

In The Chair: Moss

 

 

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

 

By unanimous consent the Senate proceeded to the order of

Resolutions

 

 

House Concurrent Resolution No. 12.

A concurrent resolution to vehemently oppose the transfer of mail processing operations from the Iron Mountain Processing and Distribution Center to the Green Bay Processing and Distribution Center in Wisconsin.

Whereas, The United States Postal Service has a long and venerable tradition of serving as a great equalizer between the people of our nation. Both the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution of the United States gave Congress the power to establish a system of post offices, and a Post Office Department was first established by the Second Continental Congress in 1775, with Benjamin Franklin appointed to serve as the Postmaster General. Throughout its 250-year history, the Post Office has chosen time and time again to prioritize service over profit, from President Washington痴 support for the subsidization of stagecoaches in the 1780s, to the construction of money-losing postal routes to encourage settlement in the west during the mid-19th century, to the creation of the Pony Express to deliver the mail through extreme environments in 1860, to the elimination of price differences based on the distance a letter was to travel in 1863. While free home delivery began in cities in 1863, it was not initially offered in rural areas, though they paid the same rates. After initial experiments showed how happy rural customers were to be given the same attention as city-dwellers, rural free delivery became a permanent service in 1902. It is the mission of the United States Postal Service 鍍o bind the Nation together through the personal, educational, literary, and business correspondence of the people; and

Whereas, The Post Office is a service that we, as a society, have chosen to provide to our people. There is no constitutional mandate that the Post Office be run as a profitable business enterprise; to the contrary, our history shows that we have repeatedly used the Post Office to ensure that every American, no matter where they live, is connected through the post. The people can choose the level of postal service that they want the United States Postal Service to provide, and they can decide what costs they are willing to bear to provide that service; and

Whereas, Contrary to the desires of many that the United States Postal Service put service first, there are those who insist that it must be run like a business. The 泥elivering for America plan, published in March 2021, emphasizes the financial viability of the Postal Service, with a focus on raising enough revenue to cover their operating costs and fund new investments. The plan proudly proclaims that it will enable the United States Postal Service to operate with a positive net income, and the most recent report boasts that it has reduced projected ten-year losses from 160 billion dollars to 70 billion dollars. These publications read like a corporate marketing pitch, establishing goals such as a 杜ore rational pricing approach, a 都table and empowered workforce and a 澱old approach to growth, innovation and continued relevance. What these profit-minded advocates seemingly fail to recognize is that lower-quality service and higher prices drive customers away, decreasing use of the postal service and thus decreasing revenue, while simultaneously undermining the Postal Service痴 mission of binding the nation together; and

Whereas, The United States Postal Service痴 focus on financial optimization has already had negative impacts on those living in rural areas, such as Michigan痴 Upper Peninsula. Local post offices have changed the time when mail is gathered for delivery from the afternoon to the early morning, meaning that a piece of mail dropped off during the day will remain at the post office for far longer before the shipping process begins. In practical effect, this adds one day to shipping times even while allowing the Postal Service to deny having done so for accounting purposes. Additionally, one-day Priority Mail Express shipping, which was available as recently as early January 2024, is no longer available from the UP to anywhere in Michigan; instead, citizens are being charged the same rate for two-day shipping. Combined with the change in collection time above, next-day shipping has essentially been transformed into three-day shipping. This is extremely problematic for businesses and health departments that need to collect samples of drinking water and have them delivered to a laboratory for bacterial testing within 24 hours of sampling. Delays in shipping also have negative consequences for patients who receive medications through the mail, for people who need to ensure their bills are paid on time, and for businesses delivering frozen foods such as the UP痴 beloved pasties. Focusing too much on the postal network as a whole while ignoring the importance of timely local shipping is not modernization; it is regression. The people of the Upper Peninsula want what痴 best for their communities, not what痴 best for the pocketbooks of those in Washington; and

Whereas, In January 2024, the United States Postal Service announced plans to transfer some mail processing services, including outgoing mail operations, from the Iron Mountain Processing and Distribution Center in Kingsford, Michigan, to the Green Bay Processing and Distribution Center in Wisconsin. The Postal Service has justified this plan based on the fact that a majority of the mail and packages sent from the Iron Mountain area are destined for locations outside the local area. While this might make sense from the standpoint of the Postal Service as a nationwide business, it does not make sense for the people of the Upper Peninsula, for whom timely local delivery is essential. The notices that have been published about this plan assure that, while five craft employee positions will be eliminated, no management positions will be eliminated. But the notices also indicate that there will be reassignments, which means that some employees could be left without a job if they are unwilling to be reassigned to a post office far away. Furthermore, recent changes to the Iron Mountain facility may have led to inaccurate conclusions about the need for it, stacking the deck so that the evidence would support the conclusion the government was looking for. The capacity of the Green Bay facility to handle the mail from the Iron Mountain area is curiously left out of the government痴 preliminary findings. When similar notices across the country all use identical, buzzword-riddled language about efficiency, cost-effectiveness, modern strategies, and 途ightsizing the postal workforce, it becomes difficult to trust that they have made a careful, informed decision about the proper level of services to provide at the Iron Mountain facility; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), That we vehemently oppose the transfer of mail processing operations from the Iron Mountain Processing and Distribution Center to the Green Bay Processing and Distribution Center in Wisconsin; and be it further

Resolved, That copies of this resolution be transmitted to the Governor of Michigan, the President of the United States, the President of the United States Senate, the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, the members of the Michigan congressional delegation, and the United States Postmaster General.

The House of Representatives has adopted the concurrent resolution.

Pending the order that, under rule 3.204, the concurrent resolution be referred to the Committee on Government Operations,

Senator Singh moved that the rule be suspended.

The motion prevailed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

The concurrent resolution was adopted.

 

 

Statements

 

 

Senators Runestad and Singh asked and were granted unanimous consent to make statements and moved that the statements be printed in the Journal.

The motion prevailed.

Senator Runestad痴 statement is as follows:

Today I reintroduced a bill to better protect vulnerable nursing home residents and to give their loved ones peace of mind by allowing them to install a video recording device in their rooms. Senate Bill No. 717 mirrors Senate Bill No. 77 of 2019 which was passed by the Legislature with bipartisan support, including unanimous support in this very chamber. Regrettably, Governor Whitmer pocket-vetoed the bill and has yet to acknowledge or explain why she made that unfortunate decision.

Sadly, the need for this important legislation has not gone away. It is a tragic reality that vulnerable seniors risk suffering in isolation and from physical abuse because of bad actors who masquerade as caregivers or otherwise gain access to these facilities. In a perfect world we wouldn稚 need this legislation, but unfortunately abuse occurs in nursing homes so we must do what we can do to protect these residents. That is why it is imperative to return this legislation to the Governor痴 desk for her signature. It is important to remember that Senate Bill No. 77 gained its momentum and support after an elderly nursing home resident was severely beaten by a 20-year-old man with coronavirus who was placed in the Westwood Nursing Center in Detroit under the Governor痴 COVID-19 executive orders. The attack left a 75-year-old man with broken fingers, broken ribs, and a broken jaw. It was also caught on video and was shared by the media.

Allowing residents to place cameras in rooms will act as a powerful deterrent to abuse, enable communication with loved ones and help prevent future tragedies. Like its predecessor, Senate Bill No. 717 would not issue a mandate on nursing homes but would simply give residents the option to install a camera in their own room. Any roommates would need to sign off on this camera and signage acknowledging the camera痴 presence would be required. Everyone deserves to be treated with decency and basic respect, especially our most vulnerable seniors who are confined to nursing care.

This bill also earned the support of leading advocates for seniors and long-term care patients. The Michigan Long Term Care Ombudsman has said residents should have the right to utilize these devices. AARP痴 Michigan director has said protecting the health and well-being of nursing home residents and their property is something our state can easily bolster. And the president of the Association for Mature American Citizens Action has said voluntarily installing cameras and communication devices safeguards the well-being of vulnerable seniors.

Friends, better protecting Michigan痴 nursing home residents should not be a partisan issue. I ask you to join me once again in unanimous support to send this important legislation to the Governor痴 desk, this time for her to sign.

 

Senator Singh痴 statement, in which Senators Anthony, McMorrow, Hertel and Brinks concurred, is as follows:

It was one year ago today that the MSU community葉he state of Michigan預ctually, our whole country謡as impacted by a tragedy when a gunman came to the campus and took the lives of three students, wounded five more, and impacted a generation of Michigan State students, faculty, staff, and members of our community.

A year later, the community is still mourning and finding a way forward. Days after, hours after the tragedy, we had the opportunity to commemorate and honor the names of those three victims輸rielle Anderson, Brian Fraser, Alexandria Verner. They were young students who had their whole lives and potential in front of them. When you talk to their families, you talk to their classmates, you talk to their teachers and faculty, they all had incredible paths they were trying to bring forward. Unfortunately, in a day of tragedy, they saw that lost. As the community came together over the days to come after that event, mourning happened in a lot of different ways.

We also spent time thanking those first responders謡e had over 25 different jurisdictions that came to Michigan State, who worked that evening and late into the night. For those who were listening to the police scanner that night saw the poise and dedication of our 9-1-1 dispatchers. Doctors and nurses who weren稚 even on call immediately went to our two local hospitals because they knew that they would be needed. And in the days to come, behavioral health specialists from around the state came to Michigan State耀ome as part of programs, some just on their own, because they knew that students, faculty, our community needed places to grieve and have the opportunity to be heard. Many of our churches, our synagogues, and our mosque temples have opened up their moments of time for discussion and healing, and we had vigils.

At the same time, a group of students who were mourning, who were angry, also came to the Capitol. They sat down in front of the Capitol, they met with our offices, and they demanded action. They were upset with us because of things that past Legislatures had not done. They did not know a path forward, but they knew something had to be done and they demanded action. We did pass a number of laws, whether they were the red-flag laws, our safe-storage laws, mandatory background checks. We also put resources into the budget for additional school safety and mental health programs, and we also prohibited those of domestic violence from buying, owning, and transporting firearms. All of those were part of a process wanting to move forward on some sensible gun-violence legislation and policies.

As we talked to the students and faculty as this anniversary was coming, people are still mourning. They are trying to figure out how to support one another. Our local schools were closed today, our university was closed today. There痴 a lot of opportunities for us to come together. ASMSU葉he student government擁n conjunction with Students Demand Action, Sit Down Michigan, and the Center for Community Engaged Learning have planned a day of service today, where they want to go out and provide volunteer support for community action to honor those three students who we had lost.

A number of counseling supports are available throughout the community at Brody Hall, at the main library and international center, at the Hannah Community Center, throughout this day for all our residents to take that needed help if they so choose. We have a number of faith leaders who will be at the alumni memorial chapel throughout the day, so regardless of your faith you will have an opportunity if you need and want to, to mourn in that fashion. There痴 actually therapy dogs at the Eppley Center for those who want to be with those animals during this time of need.

Tonight, at 7 p.m., there will be a vigil out in front of the Sparty Statue as the community and the region come together. On your desks, the student leaders have asked us to take a look at these luminaries葉hey are a green candle that痴 in these white bags. What they are doing throughout campus today is actually writing on those bags a note, a message either to the students they致e lost or feelings that they have, and lighting that green candle in those bags. We池e asking those of you who are comfortable doing that to participate with them, whether it痴 in your office, but across our campus and community at 7 p.m. we will be lighting those whether you are in-person for the vigil or not.

I just want to acknowledge the pain that a lot of us felt that day because so many of us, whether we were staff or legislators, we had children at MSU, nieces and nephews there. We have close friends and family who are part of that community. As that community mourns today, during that anniversary, I just want to remember those families, and especially the three people who we lost輸rielle Anderson, Brian Fraser, Alexandria Verner. Our hearts, our prayers, and our thoughts are with those families today as they continue their grieving process and as we move forward as a state, as a university, and as a community.

 

A moment of silence was observed in memory of the victims of the shooting at Michigan State University.

 

 

Announcements of Printing and Enrollment

 

 

The Secretary announced that the following House bills were received in the Senate and filed on Wednesday, February 7:

House Bill Nos. 4028 4613 4614

 

The Secretary announced that the following bills were printed and filed on Wednesday, February 7, and are available at the Michigan Legislature website:

Senate Bill Nos. 708 709 710 711 712 713 714 715 716

House Bill Nos. 5421 5422 5423 5424 5425 5426 5427 5428 5429 5430 5431

 

 

Committee Reports

 

 

The Committee on Oversight reported

Senate Bill No. 692, entitled

A bill to provide for the protection of certain individuals through the licensing and regulation of certain camps and camp programs; to provide for the establishment of standards of certain camps and camp programs; to require the promulgation of rules; to provide for the powers and duties of certain state and local governmental officers and entities; to create the camp licensing fund and to provide for contributions to and expenditures from the fund; to provide certain immunity from liability; and to prohibit certain conduct regarding reporting and provide penalties.

With the recommendation that the substitute (S-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.

Sam Singh

Chairperson

To Report Out:

Yeas: Senators Singh, McMorrow, Geiss and Polehanki

Nays: Senator Lindsey

The bill and the substitute recommended by the committee were referred to the Committee of the Whole.

The Committee on Oversight reported

Senate Bill No. 693, entitled

A bill to amend 1927 PA 175, entitled 典he code of criminal procedure, by amending section 15g of chapter XVII (MCL 777.15g), as amended by 2017 PA 259.

With the recommendation that the bill pass.

Sam Singh

Chairperson

To Report Out:

Yeas: Senators Singh, McMorrow, Geiss and Polehanki

Nays: Senator Lindsey

The bill was referred to the Committee of the Whole.

 

 

The Committee on Oversight reported

Senate Bill No. 694, entitled

A bill to amend 1973 PA 116, entitled 鄭n act to provide for the protection of children through the licensing and regulation of child care organizations; to provide for the establishment of standards of care for child care organizations; to prescribe powers and duties of certain departments of this state and adoption facilitators; to provide penalties; and to repeal acts and parts of acts, by amending sections 1 and 9 (MCL 722.111 and 722.119), section 1 as amended by 2023 PA 173 and section 9 as amended by 2022 PA 71; and to repeal acts and parts of acts.

With the recommendation that the substitute (S-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.

Sam Singh

Chairperson

To Report Out:

Yeas: Senators Singh, McMorrow, Geiss and Polehanki

Nays: None

The bill and the substitute recommended by the committee were referred to the Committee of the Whole.

 

 

The Committee on Oversight reported

Senate Bill No. 695, entitled

A bill to amend 1979 PA 218, entitled 鄭dult foster care facility licensing act, by amending sections 3, 5, 7, 13a, 16, 19, 22, and 26a (MCL 400.703, 400.705, 400.707, 400.713a, 400.716, 400.719, 400.722, and 400.726a), sections 3, 5, 7, 13a, and 22 as amended by 2018 PA 557, section 19 as amended by 1992 PA 176, and section 26a as amended by 2018 PA 388.

With the recommendation that the bill pass.

Sam Singh

Chairperson

To Report Out:

Yeas: Senators Singh, McMorrow, Geiss and Polehanki

Nays: None

The bill was referred to the Committee of the Whole.

 

 

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

 

The Committee on Oversight submitted the following:

Meeting held on Wednesday, February 7, 2024, at 8:30 a.m., Room 1200, Binsfeld Office Building

Present: Senators McMorrow, Geiss, Polehanki, McBroom and Lindsey

 

 

The Committee on Veterans and Emergency Services reported

House Bill No. 4845, entitled

A bill to amend 2001 PA 142, entitled 溺ichigan memorial highway act, (MCL 250.1001 to 250.2092) by adding section 103a.

With the recommendation that the bill pass.

Veronica Klinefelt

Chairperson

To Report Out:

Yeas: Senators Klinefelt, Hertel, Santana and Outman

Nays: None

The bill was referred to the Committee of the Whole.

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

 

The Committee on Veterans and Emergency Services submitted the following:

Meeting held on Wednesday, February 7, 2024, at 2:00 p.m., Room 1300, Binsfeld Office Building

Present: Senators Klinefelt (C), Hertel, Santana and Outman

 

 

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

 

The Committee on Appropriations submitted the following:

Joint meeting held on Wednesday, February 7, 2024, at 11:00 a.m., State Room, Heritage Hall, Capitol Building

Present: Senators Anthony (C), McCann, McDonald Rivet, Cherry, Bayer, Santana, Shink, Irwin, Hertel, Camilleri, Klinefelt, McMorrow, Cavanagh, Bumstead, Albert, Damoose, Huizenga, Outman and Theis

 

 

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

 

The Committee on Finance, Insurance, and Consumer Protection submitted the following:

Meeting held on Wednesday, February 7, 2024, at 1:00 p.m., Room 1200, Binsfeld Office Building

Present: Senators Cavanagh (C), Irwin, McCann, Bayer, Camilleri, Huizenga and Daley

Excused: Senator Theis

 

 

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

 

The Committee on Health Policy submitted the following:

Meeting held on Wednesday, February 7, 2024, at 1:00 p.m., Room 1100, Binsfeld Office Building

Present: Senators Hertel (C), Santana, Wojno, Cherry, Klinefelt, Geiss, Webber, Hauck and Huizenga

Excused: Senator Runestad

 

 

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

 

The Committee on Elections and Ethics submitted the following:

Meeting held on Wednesday, February 7, 2024, at 3:00 p.m., Room 1100, Binsfeld Office Building

Present: Senators Moss (C), Wojno, Santana, McMorrow, Chang and Johnson

Excused: Senator McBroom

 

 

Scheduled Meetings

 

 

Appropriations Wednesday, February 14, 2:00 p.m., Harry T. Gast Appropriations Room, 3rd Floor, Capitol Building (517) 373-5307

 

Subcommittees

 

Agriculture and Natural Resources Wednesday, February 28, 12:00 noon, Room 1300, Binsfeld Office Building (517) 373-2768

 

DHHS Wednesday, February 14, 3:30 p.m., Room 403, 4th Floor, Capitol Building (517) 373-2768

 

EGLE Thursday, February 15, 2:30 p.m., or immediately following session, Harry T. Gast Appropriations Room, 3rd Floor, Capitol Building (517) 373-2768

 

Military, Veterans, State Police and House Appropriations on Military and Veterans Affairs and State Police, Joint Tuesdays, February 20 and February 27, 9:00 a.m., Harry T. Gast Appropriations Room, 3rd Floor, Capitol Building (517) 373-2768

PreK-12 Tuesday, February 20, 12:00 noon, Harry T. Gast Appropriations Room, 3rd Floor, Capitol Building (517) 373-2768

 

Civil Rights, Judiciary, and Public Safety Thursday, February 15, 12:00 noon, Room 1200, Binsfeld Office Building (517) 373-5312

 

Economic and Community Development Thursday, February 15, 12:00 noon, Room 1100, Binsfeld Office Building (517) 373-1721

 

Energy and Environment Thursday, February 15, 1:30 p.m., Room 403, 4th Floor, Capitol Building (517) 373-5323

 

Finance, Insurance, and Consumer Protection Wednesday, February 14, 12:30 p.m., Room 1200, Binsfeld Office Building (517) 373-5314

 

Health Policy Wednesday, February 14, 12:30 p.m., Room 1100, Binsfeld Office Building (517) 373‑5323

 

 

Senator Singh moved that the Senate adjourn.

The motion prevailed, the time being 11:24 a.m.

 

The President pro tempore, Senator Moss, declared the Senate adjourned until Wednesday, February 14, 2024, at 10:00 a.m.

 

 

DANIEL OBERLIN

Secretary of the Senate