No. 72

STATE OF MICHIGAN

 

JOURNAL

OF THE

House of Representatives

 

101st Legislature

REGULAR SESSION OF 2021

 

 

 

 

House Chamber, Lansing, Tuesday, September 14, 2021.

 

1:30 p.m.

 

The House was called to order by Associate Speaker Pro Tempore Lightner.

 

The roll was called by the Clerk of the House of Representatives, who announced that a quorum was present.

 

Aiyash用resent Damoose用resent LaFave用resent Roth用resent

Albert用resent Eisen用resent LaGrand用resent Sabo用resent

Alexander用resent Ellison用resent Lasinski用resent Schroeder容xcused

Allor用resent Farrington用resent Liberati用resent Scott用resent

Anthony用resent Filler用resent Lightner用resent Shannon用resent

Beeler用resent Fink用resent Lilly用resent Slagh用resent

Bellino用resent Frederick用resent Maddock用resent Sneller用resent

Berman用resent Garza用resent Manoogian用resent Sowerby用resent

Beson用resent Glenn用resent Marino用resent Steckloff用resent

Bezotte用resent Green用resent Markkanen用resent Steenland用resent

Bolden用resent Griffin用resent Martin用resent Stone用resent

Bollin用resent Haadsma用resent Meerman用resent Tate用resent

Borton用resent Hall用resent Morse用resent Thanedar用resent

Brabec用resent Hammoud用resent Mueller用resent Tisdel用resent

Brann用resent Hauck用resent Neeley容xcused VanSingel用resent

Breen用resent Hertel用resent O樽alley用resent VanWoerkom用resent

Brixie用resent Hoitenga用resent O誰eal用resent Wakeman用resent

Calley用resent Hood用resent Outman用resent Weiss用resent

Cambensy用resent Hope用resent Paquette用resent Wendzel用resent

Camilleri用resent Hornberger用resent Peterson容xcused Wentworth用resent

Carra用resent Howell用resent Pohutsky用resent Whiteford用resent

Carter, B用resent Huizenga用resent Posthumus用resent Whitsett容xcused

Carter, T用resent Johnson, C用resent Puri用resent Witwer用resent

Cavanagh用resent Johnson, S用resent Rabhi用resent Wozniak用resent

Cherry用resent Jones容xcused Reilly用resent Yancey用resent

Clemente用resent Kahle用resent Rendon用resent Yaroch用resent

Clements用resent Koleszar用resent Rogers用resent Young用resent

Coleman用resent Kuppa用resent

 

e/d/s = entered during session

Rep. Julie M. Rogers, from the 60th District, offered the following invocation:

 

展hile I am here praying to God in the faith tradition I believe in, I encourage each of you to pray to your higher power along with me or take some time to lift up intentions of gratitude.

God, we are just a few days past the 20th anniversary of 9/11, a terrible act of terrorism on our nation that had a silver lining of uniting Americans in a way we hadn稚 been for some time. Please help us re-dedicate our efforts at setting aside our partisan differences to come together while working for the people of Michigan.

God, give us the courage and strength to rise to the challenges that face the residents of our districts. We have some pretty heavy problems weighing on us this term. Many of our areas are seeing unprecedented levels of gun violence, children being poisoned by environmental toxins, including lead, flooding that has devastated homes and businesses, terribly painful losses from COVID-19, including death of family members, increased levels of suicide, and families who are struggling and don稚 know where to turn.

God, I pray that You grant this body wisdom and help us meet the needs of our peoples, as they are significant needs. Help us remember there is no problem too big for You to help us solve and work together to find solutions to help everyone, especially our most marginalized and hurting communities. Amen.

 

 

______

 

 

The Speaker Pro Tempore assumed the Chair.

 

 

______

 

 

Rep. Rabhi moved that Reps. Jones, Neeley, Peterson and Whitsett be excused from today痴 session.

The motion prevailed.

 

Rep. Frederick moved that Rep. Schroeder be excused from today痴 session.

The motion prevailed.

 

 

Motions and Resolutions

 

 

Reps. Koleszar, Aiyash, Allor, Bezotte, Brabec, Breen, Calley, Tyrone Carter, Cavanagh, Cherry, Clemente, Garza, Haadsma, Hope, Kuppa, Lasinski, Liberati, Morse, Pohutsky, Rabhi, Sabo, Shannon, Sneller, Sowerby, Steenland, Stone, Thanedar, Weiss, Witwer and Young offered the following resolution:

House Resolution No. 151.

A resolution to declare September 2021 as Deaf Awareness Month in the state of Michigan.

Whereas, As the deaf population includes a wide range of individuals, from those who were born profoundly deaf and use American Sign Language (ASL) as a primary means of communication to those with a degree of hearing loss who use hearing aids or other forms of amplification and communication modes; and

Whereas, According to the Michigan Division on Deaf, DeafBlind and Hard of Hearing, at least 7.4 percent of the Michigan population identify as deaf, deafblind, or hard of hearing; and

Whereas, Our state benefits from the many contributions of deaf, deafblind, and hard of hearing residents throughout the state; and

Whereas, All of Michigan is enriched by the diverse and unique heritage, language, and culture of the deaf community; and

Whereas, People who identify themselves as deaf belong to a cultural and linguistic community with shared language, social norms, rules of behavior, and history; and

Whereas, It is important to ensure that Michigan痴 deaf, deafblind, or hard of hearing individuals have equal access to the many benefits and opportunities available to hearing individuals to live, work, play, and communicate in Michigan; and

Whereas, To commemorate the first congress of the World Federation of the Deaf, which was held in September of 1951, our state recognizes the entire month of September as Deaf Awareness Month; and

Whereas, The purpose of Deaf Awareness Month is to increase public awareness of the issues and the culture of people who are deaf, as well as to promote equal access to information and services for deaf individuals, to educate the public about the misconceptions of being deaf, and to learn about the types of educational programs, support services, and resources available to people who are deaf, deafblind, or hard of hearing; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That the members of this legislative body declare September 2021 as Deaf Awareness Month in the state of Michigan.

The question being on the adoption of the resolution,

The resolution was adopted.

 

 

Announcement by the Clerk of Printing and Enrollment

 

 

The Clerk announced that the following bills had been reproduced and made available electronically on Tuesday, September 14:

Senate Bill Nos. 634 635 636 637 638

 

The Clerk announced that the following Senate bill had been received on Tuesday, September 14:

Senate Bill No. 315

 

 

Reports of Standing Committees

 

 

The Committee on Tax Policy, by Rep. Hall, Chair, reported

House Bill No. 4270, entitled

A bill to amend 1937 PA 94, entitled 填se tax act, by amending sections 4 and 21 (MCL 205.94 and 205.111), section 4 as amended by 2018 PA 679 and section 21 as amended by 2020 PA 30.

With the recommendation that the substitute (H-2) be adopted and that the bill then pass.

The bill and substitute were referred to the order of Second Reading of Bills.

 

 

Favorable Roll Call

 

To Report Out:

Yeas: Reps. Hall, Tisdel, Calley, Farrington, O樽alley, Beeler, Outman, Yancey, Ellison, Brixie, Kuppa, Neeley and Cavanagh

Nays: Rep. Steven Johnson

 

 

The Committee on Tax Policy, by Rep. Hall, Chair, reported

House Bill No. 5080, entitled

A bill to amend 1933 PA 167, entitled 敵eneral sales tax act, by amending sections 1 and 25 (MCL 205.51 and 205.75), section 1 as amended by 2018 PA 2 and section 25 as amended by 2020 PA 29.

With the recommendation that the substitute (H-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.

The bill and substitute were referred to the order of Second Reading of Bills.

 

 

Favorable Roll Call

 

To Report Out:

Yeas: Reps. Hall, Tisdel, Calley, Farrington, Steven Johnson, O樽alley, Beeler and Outman

Nays: Reps. Ellison and Brixie

 

 

The Committee on Tax Policy, by Rep. Hall, Chair, reported

House Bill No. 5081, entitled

A bill to amend 1937 PA 94, entitled 填se tax act, by amending sections 2 and 21 (MCL 205.92 and 205.111), section 2 as amended by 2018 PA 1 and section 21 as amended by 2020 PA 30.

With the recommendation that the substitute (H-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.

The bill and substitute were referred to the order of Second Reading of Bills.

Favorable Roll Call

 

To Report Out:

Yeas: Reps. Hall, Tisdel, Calley, Farrington, Steven Johnson, O樽alley, Beeler and Outman

Nays: Reps. Ellison and Brixie

 

 

The Committee on Tax Policy, by Rep. Hall, Chair, reported

House Bill No. 5267, entitled

A bill to amend 1933 PA 167, entitled 敵eneral sales tax act, by amending sections 4a and 25 (MCL 205.54a and 205.75), section 4a as amended by 2018 PA 673 and section 25 as amended by 2021 PA 38.

With the recommendation that the substitute (H-2) be adopted and that the bill then pass.

The bill and substitute were referred to the order of Second Reading of Bills.

 

 

Favorable Roll Call

 

To Report Out:

Yeas: Reps. Hall, Tisdel, Calley, Farrington, O樽alley, Beeler, Outman, Yancey, Ellison, Brixie, Kuppa, Neeley and Cavanagh

Nays: Rep. Steven Johnson

 

 

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

 

The following report, submitted by Rep. Hall, Chair, of the Committee on Tax Policy, was received and read:

Meeting held on: Thursday, September 9, 2021

Present: Reps. Hall, Tisdel, Calley, Farrington, Steven Johnson, O樽alley, Beeler, Outman, Yancey, Ellison, Brixie, Kuppa, Neeley and Cavanagh

Absent: Rep. Meerman

Excused: Rep. Meerman

 

 

The Committee on Commerce and Tourism, by Rep. Marino, Chair, reported

House Resolution No. 142.

A resolution to call for international maritime containers to be treated equally in Michigan compared to other states.

(For text of resolution, see House Journal No. 68, p. 1372.)

With the recommendation that the resolution be adopted.

 

 

Favorable Roll Call

 

To Report Out:

Yeas: Reps. Marino, Roth, Farrington, Wakeman, Martin, Cambensy and Liberati

Nays: None

 

 

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

 

The following report, submitted by Rep. Marino, Chair, of the Committee on Commerce and Tourism, was received and read:

Meeting held on: Tuesday, September 14, 2021

Present: Reps. Marino, Roth, Farrington, Wakeman, Martin, Cambensy and Liberati

Absent: Reps. Wendzel, Cherry, Manoogian and Whitsett

Excused: Reps. Wendzel, Cherry, Manoogian and Whitsett

The Committee on Elections and Ethics, by Rep. Bollin, Chair, reported

House Bill No. 4876, entitled

A bill to amend 1954 PA 116, entitled 溺ichigan election law, by amending section 677 (MCL 168.677), as amended by 2018 PA 120.

With the recommendation that the substitute (H-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.

The bill and substitute were referred to the order of Second Reading of Bills.

 

 

Favorable Roll Call

 

To Report Out:

Yeas: Reps. Bollin, Wendzel, Calley, Steven Johnson and Filler

Nays: Rep. Koleszar

 

 

The Committee on Elections and Ethics, by Rep. Bollin, Chair, reported

House Bill No. 4897, entitled

A bill to amend 1954 PA 116, entitled 溺ichigan election law, by amending sections 730, 731, and 733 (MCL 168.730, 168.731, and 168.733), sections 730 and 731 as amended by 1995 PA 261 and section 733 as amended by 1996 PA 583.

With the recommendation that the substitute (H-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.

The bill and substitute were referred to the order of Second Reading of Bills.

 

 

Favorable Roll Call

 

To Report Out:

Yeas: Reps. Bollin, Wendzel, Calley, Steven Johnson and Filler

Nays: Rep. Koleszar

 

 

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

 

The following report, submitted by Rep. Bollin, Chair, of the Committee on Elections and Ethics, was received and read:

Meeting held on: Tuesday, September 14, 2021

Present: Reps. Bollin, Wendzel, Calley, Steven Johnson, Filler and Koleszar

Absent: Rep. Whitsett

Excused: Rep. Whitsett

 

 

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

 

The following report, submitted by Rep. Filler, Chair, of the Committee on Judiciary, was received and read:

Meeting held on: Tuesday, September 14, 2021

Present: Reps. Filler, Mueller, Steven Johnson, Kahle, Rendon, Berman, Wozniak, Clements, LaGrand, Yancey, Bolden, Hope and Breen

 

 

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

 

The following report, submitted by Rep. O樽alley, Chair, of the Committee on Transportation, was received and read:

Meeting held on: Tuesday, September 14, 2021

Present: Reps. O樽alley, Eisen, Howell, Griffin, Berman, Carra, Roth, Sneller, Clemente, Liberati and Puri

Absent: Reps. LaFave and Shannon

Excused: Reps. LaFave and Shannon

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

 

The following report, submitted by Rep. Hauck, Chair, of the Committee on Regulatory Reform, was received and read:

Meeting held on: Tuesday, September 14, 2021

Present: Reps. Hauck, Hoitenga, Bellino, Hall, Mueller, Clements, Damoose, Outman, Hertel, Jones, Yancey, Garza, Witwer and Steenland

Absent: Rep. Wendzel

Excused: Rep. Wendzel

 

 

Introduction of Bills

 

 

Rep. Martin introduced

House Bill No. 5287, entitled

A bill to amend 1954 PA 116, entitled 溺ichigan election law, by amending sections 370 and 719 (MCL 168.370 and 168.719), section 370 as amended by 2014 PA 94 and section 719 as amended by 2018 PA 120.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Local Government and Municipal Finance.

 

 

Reps. Beeler, Carra, Fink, Borton, Outman, Paquette, Bollin, Steven Johnson, Bezotte, Posthumus, Maddock and Allor introduced

House Bill No. 5288, entitled

A bill to amend 1954 PA 116, entitled 溺ichigan election law, by amending section 759 (MCL 168.759), as amended by 2020 PA 302.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Elections and Ethics.

 

 

Reps. Bolden, Pohutsky and Lasinski introduced

House Bill No. 5289, entitled

A bill to amend 1931 PA 328, entitled 典he Michigan penal code, by repealing section 14 (MCL 750.14).

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Health Policy.

 

 

Rep. O樽alley introduced

House Bill No. 5290, entitled

A bill to amend 1949 PA 300, entitled 溺ichigan vehicle code, by amending section 722 (MCL 257.722), as amended by 2018 PA 274.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Transportation.

 

 

Rep. O樽alley introduced

House Bill No. 5291, entitled

A bill to amend 1951 PA 51, entitled 鄭n act to provide for the classification of all public roads, streets, and highways in this state, and for the revision of that classification and for additions to and deletions from each classification; to set up and establish the Michigan transportation fund; to provide for the deposits in the Michigan transportation fund of specific taxes on motor vehicles and motor vehicle fuels; to provide for the allocation of funds from the Michigan transportation fund and the use and administration of the fund for transportation purposes; to promote safe and efficient travel for motor vehicle drivers, bicyclists, pedestrians, and other legal users of roads, streets, and highways; to set up and establish the truck safety fund; to provide for the allocation of funds from the truck safety fund and administration of the fund for truck safety purposes; to set up and establish the Michigan truck safety commission; to establish certain standards for road contracts for certain businesses; to provide for the continuing review of transportation needs within the state; to authorize the state transportation commission, counties, cities, and villages to borrow money, issue bonds, and make pledges of funds for transportation purposes; to authorize counties to advance funds for the payment of deficiencies necessary for the payment of bonds issued under this act; to provide for the limitations, payment, retirement, and security of the bonds and pledges; to provide for appropriations and tax levies by counties and townships for county roads; to authorize contributions by townships for county roads; to provide for the establishment and administration of the state trunk line fund, local bridge fund, comprehensive transportation fund, and certain other funds; to provide for the deposits in the state trunk line fund, critical bridge fund, comprehensive transportation fund, and certain other funds of money raised by specific taxes and fees; to provide for definitions of public transportation functions and criteria; to define the purposes for which Michigan transportation funds may be allocated; to provide for Michigan transportation fund grants; to provide for review and approval of transportation programs; to provide for submission of annual legislative requests and reports; to provide for the establishment and functions of certain advisory entities; to provide for conditions for grants; to provide for the issuance of bonds and notes for transportation purposes; to provide for the powers and duties of certain state and local agencies and officials; to provide for the making of loans for transportation purposes by the state transportation department and for the receipt and repayment by local units and agencies of those loans from certain specified sources; to investigate and study the tolling of roads, streets, highways, or bridges; and to repeal acts and parts of acts, (MCL 247.651 to 247.675) by adding sections 9d and 10s.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Transportation.

 

 

Rep. Slagh introduced

House Bill No. 5292, entitled

A bill to amend 1976 PA 267, entitled 徹pen meetings act, by amending section 3a (MCL 15.263a), as amended by 2021 PA 54.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Energy.

 

 

Reps. Reilly, Cambensy, Rendon, Frederick, O誰eal, Young, Wozniak, Marino, LaGrand, Outman, Paquette, Damoose, Martin, Brann, Tate, Hertel, Green, Filler, Maddock, Aiyash, LaFave, O樽alley, Whitsett, Meerman, Liberati, Roth, Markkanen, Thanedar, Calley, Posthumus and Tisdel introduced

House Bill No. 5293, entitled

A bill to amend 2006 PA 110, entitled 溺ichigan zoning enabling act, by amending section 102 (MCL 125.3102), as amended by 2008 PA 12.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Families, Children, and Seniors.

 

 

Rep. Lightner introduced

House Bill No. 5294, entitled

A bill to amend 1976 PA 331, entitled 溺ichigan consumer protection act, by amending section 3m (MCL 445.903m), as added by 2021 PA 46.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Regulatory Reform.

 

 

Reps. Hauck and Hertel introduced

House Bill No. 5295, entitled

A bill to amend 1993 PA 23, entitled 溺ichigan limited liability company act, by amending section 904 (MCL 450.4904), as amended by 2013 PA 131.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Regulatory Reform.

 

 

Reps. Hertel and Hauck introduced

House Bill No. 5296, entitled

A bill to amend 1972 PA 284, entitled 釘usiness corporation act, by amending section 284 (MCL 450.1284), as amended by 2013 PA 132.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Regulatory Reform.

 

 

Reps. Brabec, Camilleri, Aiyash and Cavanagh introduced

House Bill No. 5297, entitled

A bill to amend 1976 PA 451, entitled 典he revised school code, (MCL 380.1 to 380.1852) by adding section 1310e.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Education.

Reps. Brabec, Camilleri, Aiyash and Cavanagh introduced

House Bill No. 5298, entitled

A bill to amend 1976 PA 451, entitled 典he revised school code, by amending sections 1310, 1310a, 1311, and 1311a (MCL 380.1310, 380.1310a, 380.1311, and 380.1311a), section 1310 as amended by 2016 PA 365, section 1310a as amended by 2016 PA 532, section 1311 as amended by 2018 PA 145, and section 1311a as amended by 2016 PA 366, and by adding section 1310f.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Education.

 

 

Reps. Brabec, Camilleri, Aiyash and Cavanagh introduced

House Bill No. 5299, entitled

A bill to amend 1976 PA 451, entitled 典he revised school code, by amending section 1310d (MCL 380.1310d), as added by 2016 PA 360.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Education.

 

 

Reps. Clements, Lilly and Steenland introduced

House Bill No. 5300, entitled

A bill to amend 2016 PA 281, entitled 溺edical marihuana facilities licensing act, by amending sections 102, 201, 501, 502, 503, and 505 (MCL 333.27102, 333.27201, 333.27501, 333.27502, 333.27503, and 333.27505), section 102 as amended by 2021 PA 57, sections 201, 501, and 503 as amended by 2018 PA 10, and sections 502 and 505 as amended by 2018 PA 648.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Regulatory Reform.

 

 

Reps. Lilly and Steenland introduced

House Bill No. 5301, entitled

A bill to amend 2008 IL 1, entitled 溺ichigan Medical Marihuana Act, by amending the title and sections 3, 4, 4b, 5, 6, 7, and 8 (MCL 333.26423, 333.26424, 333.26424b, 333.26425, 333.26426, 333.26427, and 333.26428), the title and section 4 as amended and section 4b as added by 2016 PA 283, section 3 as amended by 2021 PA 62, section 6 as amended by 2020 PA 400, section 7 as amended by 2016 PA 546, and section 8 as amended by 2012 PA 512, and by adding section 4c.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Regulatory Reform.

 

 

Reps. Steenland and Lilly introduced

House Bill No. 5302, entitled

A bill to amend 2016 PA 282, entitled 溺arihuana tracking act, by amending sections 2 and 3 (MCL 333.27902 and 333.27903), section 2 as amended by 2021 PA 59.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Regulatory Reform.

 

 

______

 

 

The Speaker Pro Tempore called Associate Speaker Pro Tempore Lightner to the Chair.

 

By unanimous consent the House returned to the order of

Motions and Resolutions

 

 

Reps. Green, Aiyash, Allor, Bezotte, Brabec, Breen, Calley, Tyrone Carter, Cavanagh, Cherry, Clemente, Garza, Haadsma, Hope, Lasinski, Liberati, Morse, Pohutsky, Rabhi, Rogers, Sabo, Sneller, Steenland, Stone, Thanedar, Weiss, Witwer and Young offered the following resolution:

House Resolution No. 152.

A resolution to declare September 2021 as Childhood Cancer Awareness Month in the state of Michigan.

Whereas, In the United States it is estimated that 15,590 children and adolescents ages 0 to 19 will be diagnosed with cancer and 1,780 will die of the disease during 2021; and

Whereas, Children痴 cancer affects all ethnic, gender, and socio-economic groups; and

Whereas, Cancer is the leading cause of death by disease past infancy for U.S. children; and

Whereas, Great strides have been made since the mid-1970s in the fight against pediatric cancer. Because of major treatment advances in recent decades, more than 80 percent of children with cancer now survive 5 years or more; and

Whereas, Increased awareness, support, and study may help to further improve these statistics and further protect our children from these serious diseases; and

Whereas, We should renew our commitment to curing childhood cancer and offer our support to the brave young people who are fighting this disease; and

Whereas, To honor the memory of every young person lost to cancer, we must unite behind improved treatment, advanced research, and brighter futures for young people everywhere; and

Whereas, We also recognize the amazing strength of the families of children who suffer from this illness; and

Whereas, The ability of many families to turn their grief into positive action for other children who have been diagnosed with cancer is truly inspirational; and

Whereas, All children deserve the chance to dream, discover, and realize their full potential; now, therefore be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That the members of this legislative body declare September 2021 as Childhood Cancer Awareness Month in the state of Michigan, and be it further

Resolved, That this month, and every month, we extend our support to young people fighting for their future opportunities and recognize all who commit themselves to advancing toward the goal of a cancer-free world.

The question being on the adoption of the resolution,

The resolution was adopted.

 

 

Reps. Shannon, Hood, Sowerby, Haadsma, Coleman, Sabo, Aiyash, Tyrone Carter, Brabec, Breen, Cherry, Garza, Hope, Koleszar, Lasinski, Morse, Pohutsky, Sneller, Stone, Thanedar and Young offered the following resolution:

House Resolution No. 153.

A resolution to urge the Congress of the United States to extend the expanded federal Child Tax Credit enacted under the American Rescue Plan Act.

Whereas, The federal Child Tax Credit (CTC) provides significant support to American families. The credit provides resources for working families that lift children out of poverty and expand the opportunities available to them; and

Whereas, The American Rescue Plan Act significantly raised the credit amount, made the credit fully refundable, and expanded eligibility to families earning less than $2,500 per year; and

Whereas, These changes have been estimated to reduce child poverty by more than 40 percent. The cascading and transformative impact that this will have on these children, their families, and our country is incalculable; and

Whereas, The American Rescue Plan Act痴 Child Tax Credit provisions are set to expire after 2021. Allowing the expiration of this historic expansion would be a historic failure, plunging millions of children back into poverty. President Joe Biden and members of Congress have already proposed extending the provisions; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That we urge the Congress of the United States to extend the expanded federal Child Tax Credit enacted under the American Rescue Plan Act; and be it further

Resolved, That copies of this resolution be transmitted to the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, the President of the United States Senate, and the members of the Michigan congressional delegation.

The resolution was referred to the Committee on Tax Policy.

 

 

Reps. Anthony, Aiyash, Brabec, Breen, Tyrone Carter, Cherry, Clemente, Haadsma, Hope, Lasinski, Morse, Shannon, Sneller, Sowerby, Thanedar and Young offered the following resolution:

House Resolution No. 154.

A resolution to memorialize the Congress of the United States to enact legislation that requires any person or business selling plants online to alert customers if a plant is considered invasive and illegal to possess in a state.

Whereas, Invasive plants, whether aquatic or terrestrial, cause environmental and economic harm in Michigan and throughout the country. Once introduced, aquatic invasive plants proliferate in our waters, impacting boating, swimming, fishing, and all the businesses that support these activities. Other invasive plants spread across the land, replacing more valuable native plants, often creating impenetrable thickets, and degrading wildlife habitat, with impacts on hunting, tourism, agriculture, and birding. Hundreds of millions of dollars are spent each year to control invasive plants nationwide, and there are potentially billions of dollars in overall impacts; and

Whereas, Invasive plants often arrive in Michigan and other states by shipment from online sales. Many invasive plants are marketed and sold as ornamental or aquarium species. Consumers purchasing plants online are generally unaware if a plant is considered invasive by their state and assume that if it is being sold online it is permissible to possess; and

Whereas, Increased consumer awareness would help prevent the purchase of invasive plants. Most people would not knowingly purchase a plant or release a plant into the environment if they were aware that the plant is invasive and the damage that it could cause. Proper awareness at the point of sale would make a tremendous difference in the fight against invasive plants; and

Whereas, States are limited in their ability to enforce requirements on people and businesses selling plants online but operating out of state. Online invasive plant sales are a national problem related to interstate commerce but with significant local impacts. It is imperative that Congress address this issue; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That we memorialize the Congress of the United States to enact legislation that requires any person or business selling plants online to alert customers if a plant is considered invasive and illegal to possess in a state; and be it further

Resolved, That copies of this resolution be transmitted to the President of the United States Senate, the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, and the members of the Michigan congressional delegation.

The resolution was referred to the Committee on Commerce and Tourism.

 

 

Reps. Koleszar, Brabec, Breen, Cavanagh, Clemente, Garza, Haadsma, Hope, Kuppa, Lasinski, Sneller, Sowerby, Thanedar, Weiss and Young offered the following resolution:

House Resolution No. 155.

A resolution to encourage Michigan痴 public universities to eliminate painful experiments on dogs.

Whereas, Several Michigan universities use dogs in research and testing; and

Whereas, The federal Animal Welfare Act does not prohibit any experiment, including those that inflict pain; and

Whereas, Dogs feel pain and can suffer physically and psychologically from use in common laboratory procedures such as surgeries and the implanting of medical devices; and

Whereas, The U.S. Food and Drug Administration stated in 2021 that the agency 電oes not mandate that human drugs be studied in dogs; and

Whereas, According to a 2019 opinion poll, 70 percent of Michigan voters oppose 鍍he use of dogs in experiments that could cause them pain and 66 percent oppose 鍍he use of taxpayer money to fund experiments on dogs here in Michigan; and

Whereas, There are many non-canine methods available and human-relevant methods such as trials involving human patients, population studies, and cell-based and computer-based research methods that render painful experiments on dogs unnecessary for human health research; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That we encourage Michigan痴 public universities to eliminate painful experiments on dogs; and be it further

Resolved, That copies of this resolution be transmitted to the presidents of Michigan State University, University of Michigan, and Wayne State University.

The resolution was referred to the Committee on Regulatory Reform.

 

 

Reps. Cavanagh, Aiyash, Allor, Anthony, Bellino, Beson, Bezotte, Bolden, Brabec, Brann, Breen, Brixie, Cambensy, Camilleri, Brenda Carter, Tyrone Carter, Cherry, Clemente, Coleman, Damoose, Eisen, Ellison, Garza, Haadsma, Hammoud, Hertel, Hope, Howell, Cynthia Johnson, Koleszar, Kuppa, LaGrand, Lasinski, Liberati, Lightner, Lilly, Manoogian, Martin, Meerman, Morse, Mueller, O誰eal, Pohutsky, Puri, Rabhi, Rogers, Sabo, Scott, Shannon, Sneller, Sowerby, Steckloff, Steenland, Stone, Tate, Thanedar, Wakeman, Weiss, Whiteford, Witwer, Yancey and Young offered the following resolution:

House Resolution No. 156.

A resolution to declare September 15-October 15, 2021, as Hispanic Heritage Month in the state of Michigan.

Whereas, There has been a long and important presence of Hispanic and Latino Americans in North America and the United States of America; and

Whereas, The month of September 15 to October 15 represents the anniversary of independence for Chile, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, and Nicaragua; and

Whereas, Each year, Americans observe National Hispanic Heritage Month from September 15 to October 15 by celebrating the histories, cultures, and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America; and

Whereas, Each year, the United States recognizes the economic, cultural, and social contributions that Spanish-speaking peoples have brought to our nation, including the gifts of law, religion, agriculture, art, music, education, technology, architecture, cuisine, theater, and exploration; and

Whereas, Time and again throughout our nation痴 history, Hispanic-Americans have faithfully defended the principles of freedom and a representative government; and

Whereas, Hispanic Heritage Week was approved by President Lyndon Johnson and was expanded by President Ronald Reagan in 1988 to cover a 30-day period from September 15 to October 15, and enacted into law on August 17, 1988, as Public Law 100-402; and

Whereas, This state is fortunate to count among its population a large concentration of citizens of Spanish and Latin American descent, including those who have lived in this state for generations and those who are new to this state, who contribute to our economy and society through their commitment to professions, commerce, family, and the arts; and

Whereas, During the month from September 15 to October 15, this state痴 Hispanic-American community celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month through a series of special programs featuring Hispanic history, food, dance, and art; and

Whereas, National Hispanic Heritage Month is the period of time in the United States when people recognize the contributions of Hispanic and Latino Americans to the United States and celebrate these people痴 varied heritage, background, and culture; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That the members of this legislative body declare September 15-October 15, 2021, as Hispanic Heritage Month in the state of Michigan. We recognize and celebrate the contributions, service, and cultures of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America.

The question being on the adoption of the resolution,

The resolution was adopted.

 

 

Reps. Tisdel, Bezotte, Liberati and Steenland offered the following resolution:

House Resolution No. 157.

A resolution to urge the members of Congress to take action to mitigate the depletion of the Social Security and Medicare Trust Funds.

Whereas, Social Security benefits are paid to more than 65 million Americans, including some who use the financial resource to stay out of poverty. Approximately 21.7 million Americans would have been in poverty in 2020 without Social Security benefits. Vulnerable individuals, including the aging population and people with disabilities, depend on Social Security to supplement other forms of income. The Social Security Administration reports that Social Security benefits account for at least one-third of the income of the elderly; and

Whereas, Medicare helps pay medical costs for over 57 million individuals per year on average. Medicare allows for individuals to receive medical care and prescription drugs that they otherwise may not be able to afford. Many people enrolled in Medicare live with health problems and almost half of enrollees have incomes below 200 percent of the federal poverty level. Estimates showed that 19 percent of Medicare beneficiaries had no other form of supplemental insurance in 2016; and

Whereas, Projections in Social Security and Medicare trustees reports estimate that Social Security will only be able to pay 78 percent of scheduled benefits by 2034, and Medicare will only be able to pay 91 percent of full costs by 2026. Americans will suffer without essential benefits paid by these programs, despite paying tax dollars towards Social Security and Medicare. Lacking full Medicare benefits, many Americans will not be able to afford crucial medical services. The depletion of these social safety nets poses a great threat to not only current beneficiaries, but all those who may benefit in the future; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That we urge the United States Congress to take action to mitigate the depletion of the Social Security and Medicare Trust Funds; and be it further

Resolved, That copies of this resolution be transmitted to the President of the United States Senate, the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, and the members of the Michigan congressional delegation.

The resolution was referred to the Committee on Families, Children, and Seniors.

Reps. Yaroch, Allor, Cavanagh, Sneller and Steenland offered the following resolution:

House Resolution No. 158.

A resolution to urge the Congress of the United States to clarify its position on the legality of marijuana under the Controlled Substances Act of 1970.

Whereas, Despite federal law criminalizing marijuana, many states have exercised their authority to enact marijuana laws that reflect the needs and interests of their citizens. Currently, the state of Michigan is among a majority of states that have chosen to regulate marijuana under state law; and

Whereas, The federal government痴 lack of clarity and inconsistency in its interpretation of the legality of marijuana under the Controlled Substances Act of 1970 has created confusion and uncertainty for states legislating marijuana operations. This, in turn, affects law enforcement, banking, taxation, and zoning; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That we urge the Congress of the United States to clarify its position on the legality of marijuana under the Controlled Substances Act of 1970; and be it further

Resolved, That copies of this resolution be transmitted to the President of the United States Senate, the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, and the members of the Michigan congressional delegation.

The resolution was referred to the Committee on Regulatory Reform.

 

 

Reps. Berman, Allor, Bezotte and Cavanagh offered the following resolution:

House Resolution No. 159.

A resolution to declare September 11-17, 2021, as Patriot Week in the state of Michigan.

Whereas, We recognize that understanding American history and America痴 first principles are indispensable to the survival of our republic as a free people. In great reverence to the victims of the attacks on September 11, 2001, we acknowledge that American citizens must take time to honor the first principles, founders, documents, and symbols of their history; and

Whereas, The events that led to the signing of the Constitution of the United States of America by the delegates of the Constitutional Convention on September 17, 1787, have significance for every American. This historical occasion is honored in public schools across the nation on September 17 of each year as Constitution Day; and

Whereas, Revolution, the rule of law, social compact, equality, unalienable rights, and limited government are the first principles upon which America was founded and flourishes; and

Whereas, Exceptional, visionary, and indispensable Americans such as Thomas Paine, Patrick Henry, John Adams, John Marshall, George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, Martin Luther King, Jr., Cesar Chavez, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison founded and advanced the United States; and

Whereas, The Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the congressional resolution forwarding the Constitution to the states, Marbury v. Madison, Seneca Falls Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions, the Gettysburg Address, the Emancipation Proclamation, Brown v. Board of Education, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the 的 Have a Dream speech are key documents that embody America痴 first principles and have advanced American liberty; and

Whereas, The Bennington Flag, the original Betsy Ross American flag, the current American Flag, the Suffragist Flag, the Fort Sumter Flag, the Gadsden Flag, and the flag of the state of Michigan are fundamental physical symbols of American history and freedom that should be studied and remembered by each American citizen; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That the members of this legislative body declare September 11-17, 2021, as Patriot Week in the state of Michigan. We recognize that each generation needs to renew the spirit of America based on America痴 first principles, historical figures, founding documents, and symbols of America. The citizens, schools and other educational institutions, government agencies, municipalities, and nonprofit, religious, labor, community, and business organizations are urged to recognize and participate in Patriot Week by honoring and celebrating so that all may offer the reverence that is due to our free republic.

The question being on the adoption of the resolution,

The resolution was adopted.

 

 

Reps. Manoogian, Aiyash, Allor, Bezotte, Brabec, Breen, Tyrone Carter, Cavanagh, Cherry, Garza, Hope, Lasinski, Morse, Rogers, Sabo, Sowerby, Stone, Thanedar, Weiss and Young offered the following resolution:

House Resolution No. 160.

A resolution to welcome Afghan refugees to the state of Michigan.

Whereas, The unfolding tragedy in Afghanistan has created a humanitarian crisis. Tens of thousands of Afghans have already been evacuated from the country, and many more continue to flee the violence and repression of Taliban control; and

Whereas, Michigan痴 elected leaders have a moral obligation to support the authorized admittance of Afghan refugees to our state. Thousands of Afghans put their lives on the line to support American servicemembers, including 70,000 Michiganders, in their fight against the Taliban. We must now honor our commitment to them; and

Whereas, Michigan痴 elected leaders and various human services organizations have committed to providing the necessary support for Afghans who come to our state. This support will be critical in ensuring these refugees and our state are put in the best position to succeed; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That we welcome Afghan refugees to the state of Michigan.

The question being on the adoption of the resolution,

 

Rep. Frederick moved that consideration of the resolution be postponed for the day.

The motion prevailed.

 

 

Reps. Cynthia Johnson, Brabec, Ellison, Aiyash, Young, Hammoud, Sowerby, Camilleri, Lasinski, Brenda Carter, Weiss, Cavanagh, Scott, Kuppa, Hood, Yancey, Breen, Garza, Morse, Shannon and Sneller offered the following concurrent resolution:

House Concurrent Resolution No. 12.

A concurrent resolution to support admitting Washington, D.C. into the Union as a state of the United States of America and to urge the United States Congress to enact legislation granting statehood to the people of Washington, D.C.

Whereas, The people living on the land that would eventually be designated as the District of Columbia were provided the right to vote for representation in Congress when the U.S. Constitution was ratified in 1788; and

Whereas, The passage of the Organic Act of 1801 placed the District of Columbia under the exclusive authority of Congress and abolished residents right to vote for members of Congress and the President and Vice President; and

Whereas, Residents of the District of Columbia were granted the right to vote for electors of the President and Vice President through passage of the Twenty-third Amendment to the U.S. Constitution in 1961, but they still lack full representation in Congress; and

Whereas, As of 2020, the U.S. Census Bureau estimates that the District of Columbia痴 resident population is almost 690,000, comparable to the populations of Wyoming (576,851), Vermont (643,077), Alaska (733,391), and North Dakota (779,094); and

Whereas, Residents of the District of Columbia share all of the responsibilities of citizenship, including paying federal taxes, serving on federal juries, and defending the country as members of the U.S. Armed Forces, yet they are denied full representation in Congress; and

Whereas, Congress has repeatedly interfered with the District of Columbia痴 limited self-government by enacting laws that affect its expenditure of locally-raised tax revenue. This interference has included barring the use of local revenue, violating a fundamental principle of democracy that states and local governments are best suited to enact legislation that represents the will of their citizens; and

Whereas, Although the District of Columbia has passed consecutive balanced budgets since 1997, it still faces the possibility of being shut down yearly because of congressional deliberations over the federal budget; and

Whereas, The residents of the District of Columbia lack full democracy, equality, and citizenship enjoyed by the residents of the 50 states; and

Whereas, No other democratic nation denies the right of self-government, including participation in its national legislature, to the residents of its capital. The United Nations Human Rights Committee has called on Congress to address the District of Columbia痴 lack of political equality, and the Organization of American States has declared the disenfranchisement of District of Columbia residents a violation of its charter agreement to which the United States is a signatory; and

Whereas, The residents of the District of Columbia have endorsed statehood and passed a referendum on November 8, 2016, which favored statehood with nearly 86 percent of voters approving; and

Whereas, It is time for Congress to act on this matter and grant residents of Washington, D.C. the same rights enjoyed by residents of the 50 states. District of Columbia U.S. Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton and Delaware U.S. Senator Tom Carper have introduced H.R. 51 and S. 51, respectively, the Washington, D.C. Admission Act, to admit the state of Washington, Douglass Commonwealth into the Union; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), That we support admitting Washington, D.C. into the Union as a state of the United States of America and urge the United States Congress to enact legislation granting statehood to the people of Washington, D.C.; and be it further

Resolved, That copies of this resolution be transmitted to the President of the United States Senate, the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, and the members of the Michigan congressional delegation.

The concurrent resolution was referred to the Committee on Government Operations.

 

 

Rep. Frederick moved that Rule 42 be suspended.

The motion prevailed, 3/5 of the members present voting therefor.

 

Rep. Frederick moved that the Committee on Appropriations be discharged from further consideration of House Bill No. 5094.

The motion prevailed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

The bill was placed on the order of Second Reading of Bills.

 

 

Messages from the Senate

 

 

Senate Bill No. 616, entitled

A bill to amend 1927 PA 175, entitled 典he code of criminal procedure, by amending sections 33 and 48 of chapter XVII (MCL 777.33 and 777.48), as amended by 2021 PA 81.

The Senate passed the bill and ordered that it be given immediate effect.

The bill was read a first time by its title.

Pending the reference of the bill to a committee,

Rep. Frederick moved that Rules 41 and 42 be suspended.

The motion prevailed, 3/5 of the members present voting therefor.

Rep. Frederick moved that the bill be placed on the order of Second Reading of Bills.

The motion prevailed.

 

 

Senate Bill No. 617, entitled

A bill to amend 1949 PA 300, entitled 溺ichigan vehicle code, by amending sections 625, 625a, 625g, and 625m (MCL 257.625, 257.625a, 257.625g, and 257.625m), as amended by 2021 PA 80.

The Senate passed the bill and ordered that it be given immediate effect.

The bill was read a first time by its title.

Pending the reference of the bill to a committee,

Rep. Frederick moved that Rules 41 and 42 be suspended.

The motion prevailed, 3/5 of the members present voting therefor.

Rep. Frederick moved that the bill be placed on the order of Second Reading of Bills.

The motion prevailed.

 

 

Second Reading of Bills

 

 

Senate Bill No. 48, entitled

A bill to amend 2001 PA 142, entitled 溺ichigan memorial highway act, (MCL 250.1001 to 250.2091) by adding section 110.

The bill was read a second time.

Rep. Frederick moved that the bill be placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

The motion prevailed.

 

 

House Bill No. 5094, entitled

A bill to amend 1989 PA 196, entitled 鄭n act to abolish the criminal assessments commission; to prescribe certain duties of the crime victim services commission; to create the crime victim痴 rights fund; to provide for expenditures from the fund; to provide for assessments against criminal defendants and certain juvenile offenders; to provide for payment of crime victim痴 rights services; and to prescribe the powers and duties of certain state and local agencies and departments, by amending section 4 (MCL 780.904), as amended by 2018 PA 221.

The bill was read a second time.

Rep. Whiteford moved that the bill be placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

The motion prevailed.

 

 

Senate Bill No. 616, entitled

A bill to amend 1927 PA 175, entitled 典he code of criminal procedure, by amending sections 33 and 48 of chapter XVII (MCL 777.33 and 777.48), as amended by 2021 PA 81.

The bill was read a second time.

Rep. Frederick moved that the bill be placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

The motion prevailed.

 

 

Senate Bill No. 617, entitled

A bill to amend 1949 PA 300, entitled 溺ichigan vehicle code, by amending sections 625, 625a, 625g, and 625m (MCL 257.625, 257.625a, 257.625g, and 257.625m), as amended by 2021 PA 80.

The bill was read a second time.

Rep. Frederick moved that the bill be placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

The motion prevailed.

 

By unanimous consent the House returned to the order of

Third Reading of Bills

 

 

Rep. Frederick moved that Senate Bill No. 48 be placed on its immediate passage.

The motion prevailed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

 

Senate Bill No. 48, entitled

A bill to amend 2001 PA 142, entitled 溺ichigan memorial highway act, (MCL 250.1001 to 250.2091) by adding section 110.

Was read a third time and passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

 

 

Roll Call No. 437 Yeas101

 

 

Aiyash Clements Kahle Rogers

Albert Coleman Koleszar Roth

Alexander Damoose Kuppa Sabo

Allor Eisen LaFave Scott

Anthony Ellison LaGrand Shannon

Beeler Farrington Lasinski Slagh

Bellino Filler Liberati Sneller

Berman Fink Lightner Sowerby

Beson Frederick Lilly Steckloff

Bezotte Garza Manoogian Steenland

Bolden Glenn Markkanen Stone

Bollin Green Martin Tate

Borton Griffin Meerman Thanedar

Brabec Haadsma Morse Tisdel

Brann Hall Mueller VanSingel

Breen Hammoud O樽alley VanWoerkom

Brixie Hauck O誰eal Wakeman

Calley Hertel Outman Weiss

Cambensy Hoitenga Paquette Wendzel

Camilleri Hood Pohutsky Wentworth

Carra Hope Posthumus Whiteford

Carter, B Hornberger Puri Witwer

Carter, T Howell Rabhi Wozniak

Cavanagh Huizenga Reilly Yaroch

Cherry Johnson, C Rendon Young

Clemente

 

 

Nays3

 

 

Johnson, S Maddock Yancey

 

 

In The Chair: Lightner

 

 

Pursuant to Joint Rule 20, the full title of the act shall be inserted to read as follows:

鄭n act to consolidate prior acts naming certain Michigan highways; to provide for the naming of certain highways; to prescribe certain duties of the state transportation department; and to repeal acts and parts of acts and certain resolutions,

The House agreed to the full title.

Rep. Frederick moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

 

 

______

 

 

Rep. Yancey, having reserved the right to explain her protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

溺r. Speaker and members of the House:

In a day and time where Black Americans and/or African Americans are requesting buildings, roads, etc to be renamed due to them being named after known racists, I cannot in good conscious continue to name highways after people whom I do not know enough about.

 

 

Rep. Frederick moved that House Bill No. 5094 be placed on its immediate passage.

The motion prevailed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

 

House Bill No. 5094, entitled

A bill to amend 1989 PA 196, entitled 鄭n act to abolish the criminal assessments commission; to prescribe certain duties of the crime victim services commission; to create the crime victim痴 rights fund; to provide for expenditures from the fund; to provide for assessments against criminal defendants and certain juvenile offenders; to provide for payment of crime victim痴 rights services; and to prescribe the powers and duties of certain state and local agencies and departments, by amending section 4 (MCL 780.904), as amended by 2018 PA 221.

The bill was read a third time.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

 

Rep. Frederick moved that consideration of the bill be postponed for the day.

The motion prevailed.

 

 

Rep. Frederick moved that Senate Bill No. 616 be placed on its immediate passage.

The motion prevailed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

 

Senate Bill No. 616, entitled

A bill to amend 1927 PA 175, entitled 典he code of criminal procedure, by amending sections 33 and 48 of chapter XVII (MCL 777.33 and 777.48), as amended by 2021 PA 81.

Was read a third time and passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

 

 

Roll Call No. 438 Yeas101

 

 

Aiyash Coleman Kahle Roth

Albert Damoose Koleszar Sabo

Alexander Eisen Kuppa Scott

Allor Ellison LaGrand Shannon

Anthony Farrington Lasinski Slagh

Beeler Filler Liberati Sneller

Bellino Fink Lightner Sowerby

Berman Frederick Lilly Steckloff

Beson Garza Maddock Steenland

Bezotte Glenn Manoogian Stone

Bolden Green Markkanen Tate

Bollin Griffin Martin Thanedar

Borton Haadsma Meerman Tisdel

Brabec Hall Morse VanSingel

Brann Hammoud Mueller VanWoerkom

Breen Hauck O樽alley Wakeman

Brixie Hertel O誰eal Weiss

Calley Hoitenga Outman Wendzel

Cambensy Hood Paquette Wentworth

Camilleri Hope Pohutsky Whiteford

Carter, B Hornberger Posthumus Witwer

Carter, T Howell Puri Wozniak

Cavanagh Huizenga Rabhi Yancey

Cherry Johnson, C Rendon Yaroch

Clemente Johnson, S Rogers Young

Clements

 

 

Nays3

 

 

Carra LaFave Reilly

 

 

In The Chair: Lightner

 

 

Pursuant to Joint Rule 20, the full title of the act shall be inserted to read as follows:

鄭n act to revise, consolidate, and codify the laws relating to criminal procedure and to define the jurisdiction, powers, and duties of courts, judges, and other officers of the court under the provisions of this act; to provide laws relative to the rights of persons accused of criminal offenses and ordinance violations; to provide for the arrest of persons charged with or suspected of criminal offenses and ordinance violations; to provide for bail of persons arrested for or accused of criminal offenses and ordinance violations; to provide for the examination of persons accused of criminal offenses; to regulate the procedure relative to grand juries, indictments, informations, and proceedings before trial; to provide for trials of persons complained of or indicted for criminal offenses and ordinance violations and to provide for the procedure in those trials; to provide for judgments and sentences of persons convicted of criminal offenses and ordinance violations; to establish a sentencing commission and to prescribe its powers and duties; to provide for procedure relating to new trials and appeals in criminal and ordinance violation cases; to provide a uniform system of probation throughout this state and the appointment of probation officers; to prescribe the powers, duties, and compensation of probation officers; to provide penalties for the violation of the duties of probation officers; to provide for procedure governing proceedings to prevent crime and proceedings for the discovery of crime; to provide for fees of officers, witnesses, and others in criminal and ordinance violation cases; to set forth miscellaneous provisions as to criminal procedure in certain cases; to provide penalties for the violation of certain provisions of this act; and to repeal all acts and parts of acts inconsistent with or contravening any of the provisions of this act,

The House agreed to the full title.

Rep. Frederick moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

 

 

Rep. Frederick moved that Senate Bill No. 617 be placed on its immediate passage.

The motion prevailed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

 

Senate Bill No. 617, entitled

A bill to amend 1949 PA 300, entitled 溺ichigan vehicle code, by amending sections 625, 625a, 625g, and 625m (MCL 257.625, 257.625a, 257.625g, and 257.625m), as amended by 2021 PA 80.

Was read a third time and passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

 

 

Roll Call No. 439 Yeas101

 

 

Aiyash Coleman Kahle Roth

Albert Damoose Koleszar Sabo

Alexander Eisen Kuppa Scott

Allor Ellison LaGrand Shannon

Anthony Farrington Lasinski Slagh

Beeler Filler Liberati Sneller

Bellino Fink Lightner Sowerby

Berman Frederick Lilly Steckloff

Beson Garza Maddock Steenland

Bezotte Glenn Manoogian Stone

Bolden Green Markkanen Tate

Bollin Griffin Martin Thanedar

Borton Haadsma Meerman Tisdel

Brabec Hall Morse VanSingel

Brann Hammoud Mueller VanWoerkom

Breen Hauck O樽alley Wakeman

Brixie Hertel O誰eal Weiss

Calley Hoitenga Outman Wendzel

Cambensy Hood Paquette Wentworth

Camilleri Hope Pohutsky Whiteford

Carter, B Hornberger Posthumus Witwer

Carter, T Howell Puri Wozniak

Cavanagh Huizenga Rabhi Yancey

Cherry Johnson, C Rendon Yaroch

Clemente Johnson, S Rogers Young

Clements

 

 

Nays3

 

 

Carra LaFave Reilly

 

 

In The Chair: Lightner

Pursuant to Joint Rule 20, the full title of the act shall be inserted to read as follows:

鄭n act to provide for the registration, titling, sale, transfer, and regulation of certain vehicles operated upon the public highways of this state or any other place open to the general public or generally accessible to motor vehicles and distressed vehicles; to provide for the licensing of dealers; to provide for the examination, licensing, and control of operators and chauffeurs; to provide for the giving of proof of financial responsibility and security by owners and operators of vehicles; to provide for the imposition, levy, and collection of specific taxes on vehicles, and the levy and collection of sales and use taxes, license fees, and permit fees; to provide for the regulation and use of streets and highways; to create certain funds; to provide penalties and sanctions for a violation of this act; to provide for civil liability of manufacturers, the manufacturers of certain devices, the manufacturers of automated technology, upfitters, owners, and operators of vehicles and service of process on residents and nonresidents; to regulate the introduction and use of certain evidence; to regulate and certify the manufacturers of certain devices; to provide for approval and certification of installers and servicers of certain devices; to provide for the levy of certain assessments; to provide for the enforcement of this act; to provide for the creation of and to prescribe the powers and duties of certain state and local agencies; to impose liability upon the state or local agencies; to provide appropriations for certain purposes; to repeal all other acts or parts of acts inconsistent with this act or contrary to this act; and to repeal certain parts of this act on a specific date,

The House agreed to the full title.

Rep. Frederick moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

 

 

Messages from the Governor

 

 

The following veto message from the Governor was received and read:

 

Executive Office, Lansing, September 10, 2021

Michigan House of Representatives

State Capitol Building

Lansing, MI 48909-7514

 

Representatives,

I am returning Enrolled House Bill 4061 to you without my signature.

This bill would add complexity to the administration of the state痴 public threat alert system, making it harder for law enforcement officers to do their jobs and making Michiganders less safe. Since it was launched in 2016, the public threat alert system has been used only once to alert the public to active shooter situation. There is no need to further limit or complicate its use.

For the foregoing reasons, I am vetoing HB 4061 of 2021.

Sincerely,

Gretchen Whitmer

Governor

The question being on the passage of the bill, the objections of the Governor to the contrary notwithstanding,

Rep. Frederick moved that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Government Operations.

The motion prevailed.

 

 

The following veto message from the Governor was received and read:

 

Executive Office, Lansing, September 10, 2021

Michigan House of Representatives

State Capitol Building

Lansing, MI 48909-7514

 

Representatives,

I am returning Enrolled House Bill 4272 to you without my signature.

This legislation ignores clear federal law in an attempt to exempt certain gas cans from environmental laws designed to limit the release of volatile organic compounds. If this bill were to become law, it would no doubt be swiftly struck down because it violates both the Commerce and Supremacy clauses of the U.S. Constitution. That would be a waste of valuable time and taxpayer money.

For the foregoing reasons, I am vetoing HB 4272 of 2021.

Sincerely,

Gretchen Whitmer

Governor

The question being on the passage of the bill, the objections of the Governor to the contrary notwithstanding,

Rep. Frederick moved that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Commerce and Tourism.

The motion prevailed.

 

 

______

 

 

Rep. Frederick moved that House Committees be given leave to meet during the balance of today痴 session.

The motion prevailed.

 

By unanimous consent the House returned to the order of

Motions and Resolutions

 

 

Rep. Frederick moved that when the House adjourns today it stand adjourned until Tuesday, September 21, at 1:30 p.m.

The motion prevailed.

 

 

Messages from the Senate

 

 

Senate Bill No. 315, entitled

A bill to amend 2008 PA 551, entitled 填niform securities act (2002), (MCL 451.2101 to 451.2703) by amending the title, as amended by 2014 PA 355, and by adding article 5A.

The Senate has passed the bill.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Financial Services.

 

 

Senate Bill No. 425, entitled

A bill to amend 1951 PA 51, entitled 鄭n act to provide for the classification of all public roads, streets, and highways in this state, and for the revision of that classification and for additions to and deletions from each classification; to set up and establish the Michigan transportation fund; to provide for the deposits in the Michigan transportation fund of specific taxes on motor vehicles and motor vehicle fuels; to provide for the allocation of funds from the Michigan transportation fund and the use and administration of the fund for transportation purposes; to promote safe and efficient travel for motor vehicle drivers, bicyclists, pedestrians, and other legal users of roads, streets, and highways; to set up and establish the truck safety fund; to provide for the allocation of funds from the truck safety fund and administration of the fund for truck safety purposes; to set up and establish the Michigan truck safety commission; to establish certain standards for road contracts for certain businesses; to provide for the continuing review of transportation needs within the state; to authorize the state transportation commission, counties, cities, and villages to borrow money, issue bonds, and make pledges of funds for transportation purposes; to authorize counties to advance funds for the payment of deficiencies necessary for the payment of bonds issued under this act; to provide for the limitations, payment, retirement, and security of the bonds and pledges; to provide for appropriations and tax levies by counties and townships for county roads; to authorize contributions by townships for county roads; to provide for the establishment and administration of the state trunk line fund, local bridge fund, comprehensive transportation fund, and certain other funds; to provide for the deposits in the state trunk line fund, critical bridge fund, comprehensive transportation fund, and certain other funds of money raised by specific taxes and fees; to provide for definitions of public transportation functions and criteria; to define the purposes for which Michigan transportation funds may be allocated; to provide for Michigan transportation fund grants; to provide for review and approval of transportation programs; to provide for submission of annual legislative requests and reports; to provide for the establishment and functions of certain advisory entities; to provide for conditions for grants; to provide for the issuance of bonds and notes for transportation purposes; to provide for the powers and duties of certain state and local agencies and officials; to provide for the making of loans for transportation purposes by the state transportation department and for the receipt and repayment by local units and agencies of those loans from certain specified sources; to investigate and study the tolling of roads, streets, highways, or bridges; and to repeal acts and parts of acts, (MCL 247.651 to 247.675) by adding section 11i.

The Senate has passed the bill.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Transportation.

 

 

Senate Bill No. 427, entitled

A bill to amend 1951 PA 51, entitled 鄭n act to provide for the classification of all public roads, streets, and highways in this state, and for the revision of that classification and for additions to and deletions from each classification; to set up and establish the Michigan transportation fund; to provide for the deposits in the Michigan transportation fund of specific taxes on motor vehicles and motor vehicle fuels; to provide for the allocation of funds from the Michigan transportation fund and the use and administration of the fund for transportation purposes; to promote safe and efficient travel for motor vehicle drivers, bicyclists, pedestrians, and other legal users of roads, streets, and highways; to set up and establish the truck safety fund; to provide for the allocation of funds from the truck safety fund and administration of the fund for truck safety purposes; to set up and establish the Michigan truck safety commission; to establish certain standards for road contracts for certain businesses; to provide for the continuing review of transportation needs within the state; to authorize the state transportation commission, counties, cities, and villages to borrow money, issue bonds, and make pledges of funds for transportation purposes; to authorize counties to advance funds for the payment of deficiencies necessary for the payment of bonds issued under this act; to provide for the limitations, payment, retirement, and security of the bonds and pledges; to provide for appropriations and tax levies by counties and townships for county roads; to authorize contributions by townships for county roads; to provide for the establishment and administration of the state trunk line fund, local bridge fund, comprehensive transportation fund, and certain other funds; to provide for the deposits in the state trunk line fund, critical bridge fund, comprehensive transportation fund, and certain other funds of money raised by specific taxes and fees; to provide for definitions of public transportation functions and criteria; to define the purposes for which Michigan transportation funds may be allocated; to provide for Michigan transportation fund grants; to provide for review and approval of transportation programs; to provide for submission of annual legislative requests and reports; to provide for the establishment and functions of certain advisory entities; to provide for conditions for grants; to provide for the issuance of bonds and notes for transportation purposes; to provide for the powers and duties of certain state and local agencies and officials; to provide for the making of loans for transportation purposes by the state transportation department and for the receipt and repayment by local units and agencies of those loans from certain specified sources; to investigate and study the tolling of roads, streets, highways, or bridges; and to repeal acts and parts of acts, (MCL 247.651 to 247.675) by adding section 11k.

The Senate has passed the bill.

The bill was read a first time by its title and referred to the Committee on Transportation.

 

 

Notices

 

 

September 14, 2021

Mr. Gary Randall, Clerk

Michigan House of Representatives

State Capitol Building

Lansing, MI 48913

 

Dear Clerk Randall,

This letter is to notify you that I am removing Representative Steve Marino from the following committees:

腹 Commerce and Tourism

腹 Local Government and Municipal Finance

I am also making the following appointments:

腹 Representative Pauline Wendzel as Chair to the committee on Commerce and Tourism

Sincerely,

Jason Wentworth, Speaker

Michigan House of Representatives

Rep. Hoitenga moved that the House adjourn.

The motion prevailed, the time being 4:25 p.m.

 

Associate Speaker Pro Tempore Lightner declared the House adjourned until Tuesday, September 21, at 1:30 p.m.

 

 

GARY L. RANDALL

Clerk of the House of Representatives