No. 56

STATE OF MICHIGAN

Journal of the Senate

98th Legislature

REGULAR SESSION OF 2015

Senate Chamber, Lansing, Thursday, June 11, 2015.

10:00 a.m.

The Senate was called to order by the President, Lieutenant Governor Brian N. Calley.

The roll was called by the Secretary of the Senate, who announced that a quorum was present.

Ananich—present Hopgood—present Pavlov—present

Bieda—present Horn—present Proos—present

Booher—present Hune—present Robertson—present

Brandenburg—present Johnson—present Rocca—present

Casperson—present Jones—present Schmidt—present

Colbeck—present Knezek—present Schuitmaker—present

Emmons—present Knollenberg—present Shirkey—present

Green—present Kowall—present Smith—present

Gregory—present MacGregor—present Stamas—present

Hansen—present Marleau—present Warren—present

Hertel—present Meekhof—present Young—present

Hildenbrand—present Nofs—present Zorn—present

Hood—present O’Brien—present

Reverend Mark Pietscher of Bella Vista Church of Rockford offered the following invocation:

Father God Almighty, we thank You for Your grace, love, and mercy. We thank You that in the book of Proverbs You instruct us that the beginning of true wisdom is the fear of the Lord. Father, give us divine eyes to see that perspective; that You are God and we are not; that You call us from a divine perspective to bend our knees, hearts, and wills to Your way, guidance, wisdom, and love. Father, bless our Senators with that wisdom for the tremendous task of leading people and at the same time following You.

Father, we thank You that in the book of Colossians You teach us that You are the Lord of the universe. You are the Lord of creation and the church and government. You are also the Lord of our lives. So we bend our hearts, wills, and ways to Your guidance. Bless us with real wisdom. We are grateful for Your love and grace.

In Your unmatchable name, Amen.

The President, Lieutenant Governor Calley, led the members of the Senate in recital of the Pledge of Allegiance.

Motions and Communications

Senator Green entered the Senate Chamber.

Senator Hood moved that Senator Young be temporarily excused from today’s session.

The motion prevailed.

Senator Knollenberg asked and was granted unanimous consent to make a statement and moved that the statement be printed in the Journal.

The motion prevailed.

Senator Knollenberg’s statement is as follows:

I’d like to take a moment to recognize my legislative assistant, Christopher Pascoe, for his service to the people of the 13th District. Chris is moving on to new opportunities after graduating from MSU with a degree in Interdisciplinary Studies, with a concentration in Human Capital and Society and a specialization in Economics. That degree is difficult to say. I can only imagine how difficult it was to obtain.

Chris has been with me since January working on constituent issues. As we know, the work we do on behalf of our constituents—the differences we are able to make in their daily lives—is the most important aspect of public service. Chris has done a great job. He’s been diligent, conscientious, and compassionate.

Chris, you’ve served the people of the 13th District well, and I’m proud to have had you as part of my team. As a small token of my gratitude, I’d like to present you with a framed state Coat of Arms, signed by the members of the Michigan Senate.

Colleagues, please join me in acknowledging Christopher Pascoe for his service to the people of the 13th District.

The Secretary announced that pursuant to Rule 2.109 of the Standing Rules of the Senate, the following expense reports have been filed with the Senate Business Office for the quarter from January 1, 2015 through March 31, 2015, and are available in the Senate Business Office during business hours for public inspection:

Committee Chairperson

Agriculture Senator Joe Hune

Appropriations Senator Dave Hildenbrand

Banking and Financial Institutions Senator Darwin Booher

Commerce Senator Wayne Schmidt

Economic Development Senator Ken Horn

Education Senator Phil Pavlov

Elections and Government Reform Senator David Robertson

Energy and Technology Senator Mike Nofs

Families, Seniors and Human Services Senator Judy Emmons

Finance Senator Jack Brandenburg

Government Operations Senator Arlan Meekhof

Health Policy Senator Mike Shirkey

Insurance Senator Joe Hune

Judiciary Senator Rick Jones

Local Government Senator Dale Zorn

Michigan Competitiveness Senator Mike Shirkey

Natural Resources Senator Tom Casperson

Outdoor Recreation and Tourism Senator Goeff Hansen

Regulatory Reform Senator Tory Rocca

Transportation Senator Tom Casperson

Veterans, Military Affairs and Homeland Security Senator Margaret O’Brien

The Secretary announced that the following House bills were received in the Senate and filed on Wednesday, June 10:

House Bill Nos. 4605 4606 4607 4608 4609 4610 4611 4612 4613 4614 4615 4616

The Secretary announced that the following bills were printed and filed on Wednesday, June 10, and are available at the Michigan Legislature website:

Senate Bill Nos. 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390

House Bill Nos. 4688 4689 4690 4691 4692 4693 4694 4695 4696 4697 4698 4699 4700 4701

4702 4703 4704 4705

Recess

Senator Kowall moved that the Senate recess subject to the call of the Chair.

The motion prevailed, the time being 10:08 a.m.

11:00 a.m.

The Senate was called to order by the President, Lieutenant Governor Calley.

During the recess, Senator Young entered the Senate Chamber.

Senator Kowall moved that the rules be suspended and that the following bill, now on Committee Reports, be placed on the General Orders calendar for consideration today:

House Bill No. 4101

The motion prevailed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

Messages from the Governor

The following messages from the Governor were received:

Date: June 8, 2015

Time: 12:10 p.m.

To the President of the Senate:

Sir—I have this day approved and signed

Enrolled Senate Bill No. 86 (Public Act No. 46), being

An act to amend 2001 PA 34, entitled “An act relative to the borrowing of money and the issuance of certain debt and securities; to provide for tax levies and sinking funds; to prescribe powers and duties of certain departments, state agencies, officials, and employees; to impose certain duties, requirements, and filing fees upon political subdivisions of this state; to authorize the issuance of certain debt and securities; to prescribe penalties; and to repeal acts and parts of acts,” by amending section 518 (MCL 141.2518), as amended by 2014 PA 297.

(Filed with the Secretary of State on June 9, 2015, at 4:10 p.m.)

Date: June 8, 2015

Time: 12:12 p.m.

To the President of the Senate:

Sir—I have this day approved and signed

Enrolled Senate Bill No. 221 (Public Act No. 45), being

An act to provide for the reciprocal exchange of distance education between this state and other states or a higher education compact; to prescribe the powers and duties of certain state agencies and officials; to provide for collection of fees; to designate the state agency for negotiating distance education agreements; to establish a complaint process for students enrolled in distance education programs at participating colleges and universities; to establish an authorization and approval process for out-of-state distance education providers and participating colleges and universities in this state; to provide penalties; and to repeal acts and parts of acts.

(Filed with the Secretary of State on June 9, 2015, at 4:08 p.m.)

Date: June 8, 2015

Time: 12:14 p.m.

To the President of the Senate:

Sir—I have this day approved and signed

Enrolled Senate Bill No. 271 (Public Act No. 47), being

An act to amend 1998 PA 58, entitled “An act to create a commission for the control of the alcoholic beverage traffic within this state, and to prescribe its powers, duties, and limitations; to provide for powers and duties for certain state departments and agencies; to impose certain taxes for certain purposes; to provide for the control of the alcoholic liquor traffic within this state and to provide for the power to establish state liquor stores; to prohibit the use of certain devices for the dispensing of alcoholic vapor; to provide for the care and treatment of alcoholics; to provide for the incorporation of farmer cooperative wineries and the granting of certain rights and privileges to those cooperatives; to provide for the licensing and taxation of activities regulated under this act and the disposition of the money received under this act; to prescribe liability for retail licensees under certain circumstances and to require security for that liability; to provide procedures, defenses, and remedies regarding violations of this act; to provide for the enforcement and to prescribe penalties for violations of this act; to provide for allocation of certain funds for certain purposes; to provide for the confiscation and disposition of property seized under this act; to provide referenda under certain circumstances; and to repeal acts and parts of acts,” (MCL 436.1101 to 436.2303) by adding section 1014.

(Filed with the Secretary of State on June 9, 2015, at 4:12 p.m.)

Date: June 8, 2015

Time: 12:18 p.m.

To the President of the Senate:

Sir—I have this day approved and signed

Enrolled Senate Bill No. 196 (Public Act No. 48), being

An act to amend 1949 PA 300, entitled “An act to provide for the registration, titling, sale, transfer, and regulation of certain vehicles operated upon the public highways of this state or any other place open to the general public or generally accessible to motor vehicles and distressed vehicles; to provide for the licensing of dealers; to provide for the examination, licensing, and control of operators and chauffeurs; to provide for the giving of proof of financial responsibility and security by owners and operators of vehicles; to provide for the imposition, levy, and collection of specific taxes on vehicles, and the levy and collection of sales and use taxes, license fees, and permit fees; to provide for the regulation and use of streets and highways; to create certain funds; to provide penalties and sanctions for a violation of this act; to provide for civil liability of manufacturers, the manufacturers of automated technology, upfitters, owners, and operators of vehicles and service of process on residents and nonresidents; to regulate the introduction and use of certain evidence; to provide for the levy of certain assessments; to provide for the enforcement of this act; to provide for the creation of and to prescribe the powers and duties of certain state and local agencies; to impose liability upon the state or local agencies; to provide appropriations for certain purposes; to repeal all other acts or parts of acts inconsistent with this act or contrary to this act; and to repeal certain parts of this act on a specific date,” by amending sections 217c, 217f, 248c, and 252a (MCL 257.217c, 257.217f, 257.248c, and 257.252a), section 217c as amended by 2002 PA 642, sections 217f and 248c as amended by 1993 PA 300, and section 252a as amended by 2008 PA 539.

(Filed with the Secretary of State on June 9, 2015, at 4:14 p.m.)

Date: June 8, 2015

Time: 12:24 p.m.

To the President of the Senate:

Sir—I have this day approved and signed

Enrolled Senate Bill No. 9 (Public Act No. 52), being

An act to amend 1970 PA 91, entitled “An act to declare the inherent rights of minor children; to establish rights and duties to their custody, support, and parenting time in disputed actions; to establish rights and duties to provide support for a child after the child reaches the age of majority under certain circumstances; to provide for certain procedure and appeals; and to repeal certain acts and parts of acts,” by amending section 7 (MCL 722.27), as amended by 2005 PA 328.

(Filed with the Secretary of State on June 9, 2015, at 4:22 p.m.)

Respectfully,

Rick Snyder

Governor

By unanimous consent the Senate proceeded to the order of

Introduction and Referral of Bills

Senator Jones introduced

Senate Bill No. 392, entitled

A bill to amend 1982 PA 432, entitled “Motor bus transportation act,” by amending the title and sections 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 15, 16, 17, 23, 27, 29, 32, 33, 34, 35, and 39 (MCL 474.101, 474.103, 474.104, 474.105, 474.107, 474.109, 474.115, 474.116, 474.117, 474.123, 474.127, 474.129, 474.132, 474.133, 474.134, 474.135, and 474.139), sections 3, 4, 5, 7, 17, 23, 27, 29, 33, 34, 35, and 39 as amended and section 32 as added by 1989 PA 233, section 9 as amended by 2012 PA 570, and section 16 as amended by 1996 PA 421, and by adding sections 10 and 38; and to repeal acts and parts of acts.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Transportation.

Senator Hood introduced

Senate Bill No. 393, entitled

A bill to amend 1949 PA 300, entitled “Michigan vehicle code,” by amending section 803 (MCL 257.803), as amended by 2002 PA 490.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Transportation.

Senator Robertson introduced

Senate Bill No. 394, entitled

A bill to amend 1917 PA 167, entitled “Housing law of Michigan,” by amending sections 1, 125, and 126 (MCL 125.401, 125.525, and 125.526), sections 1 and 126 as amended by 2008 PA 408.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Local Government.

Senators Gregory, Nofs, Johnson, Knezek, Ananich, Hopgood, Hertel, Hood, Warren, Young and Smith introduced

Senate Bill No. 395, entitled

A bill to amend 1967 PA 281, entitled “Income tax act of 1967,” (MCL 206.1 to 206.713) by adding section 277.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Finance.

Senators Hopgood, Warren, Smith, Bieda, Gregory, Knezek, Young, Johnson and Ananich introduced

Senate Bill No. 396, entitled

A bill to amend 1949 PA 300, entitled “Michigan vehicle code,” by amending sections 719 and 724 (MCL 257.719 and 257.724), section 719 as amended by 2012 PA 282 and section 724 as amended by 2012 PA 498.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Transportation.

Senators Ananich, Hertel, Bieda, Hopgood, Knezek, Warren and Young introduced

Senate Bill No. 397, entitled

A bill to prohibit an employer from making certain personal inquiries of employees or applicants for employment; to prohibit discrimination and retaliation for actions to enforce the prohibition on personal inquiries; and to provide remedies.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Government Operations.

House Bill No. 4605, entitled

A bill to amend 1967 PA 281, entitled “Income tax act of 1967,” by amending section 51 (MCL 206.51), as amended by 2012 PA 223.

The House of Representatives has passed the bill and ordered that it be given immediate effect.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Government Operations.

House Bill No. 4606, entitled

A bill to amend 1933 PA 167, entitled “General sales tax act,” by amending section 25 (MCL 205.75), as amended by 2012 PA 226.

The House of Representatives has passed the bill and ordered that it be given immediate effect.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Government Operations.

House Bill No. 4607, entitled

A bill to amend 2000 PA 489, entitled “Michigan trust fund act,” by amending sections 7 and 8 (MCL 12.257 and 12.258), as amended by 2014 PA 504.

The House of Representatives has passed the bill.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Government Operations.

House Bill No. 4608, entitled

A bill to amend 1984 PA 270, entitled “Michigan strategic fund act,” (MCL 125.2001 to 125.2094) by adding section 15.

The House of Representatives has passed the bill.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Government Operations.

House Bill No. 4609, entitled

A bill to amend 1967 PA 281, entitled “Income tax act of 1967,” by amending section 272 (MCL 206.272), as amended by 2011 PA 38.

The House of Representatives has passed the bill and ordered that it be given immediate effect.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Government Operations.

House Bill No. 4610, entitled

A bill to amend 1909 PA 283, entitled “An act to revise, consolidate, and add to the laws relating to the establishment, opening, discontinuing, vacating, closing, altering, improvement, maintenance, and use of the public highways and private roads; the condemnation of property and gravel therefor; the building, repairing and preservation of bridges; maintaining public access to waterways under certain conditions; setting and protecting shade trees, drainage, and cutting weeds and brush within this state; providing for the election or appointment and defining the powers, duties, and compensation of state, county, township, and district highway officials; and to prescribe penalties and provide remedies,” (MCL 220.1 to 239.6) by adding section 19c to chapter IV.

The House of Representatives has passed the bill and ordered that it be given immediate effect.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Government Operations.

House Bill No. 4611, entitled

A bill to amend 1951 PA 51, entitled “An act to provide for the classification of all public roads, streets, and highways in this state, and for the revision of that classification and for additions to and deletions from each classification; to set up and establish the Michigan transportation fund; to provide for the deposits in the Michigan transportation fund of specific taxes on motor vehicles and motor vehicle fuels; to provide for the allocation of funds from the Michigan transportation fund and the use and administration of the fund for transportation purposes; to promote safe and efficient travel for motor vehicle drivers, bicyclists, pedestrians, and other legal users of roads, streets, and highways; to set up and establish the truck safety fund; to provide for the allocation of funds from the truck safety fund and administration of the fund for truck safety purposes; to set up and establish the Michigan truck safety commission; to establish certain standards for road contracts for certain businesses; to provide for the continuing review of transportation needs within the state; to authorize the state transportation commission, counties, cities, and villages to borrow money, issue bonds, and make pledges of funds for transportation purposes; to authorize counties to advance funds for the payment of deficiencies necessary for the payment of bonds issued under this act; to provide for the limitations, payment, retirement, and security of the bonds and pledges; to provide for appropriations and tax levies by counties and townships for county roads; to authorize contributions by townships for county roads; to provide for the establishment and administration of the state trunk line fund, local bridge fund, comprehensive transportation fund, and certain other funds; to provide for the deposits in the state trunk line fund, critical bridge fund, comprehensive transportation fund, and certain other funds of money raised by specific taxes and fees; to provide for definitions of public transportation functions and criteria; to define the purposes for which Michigan transportation funds may be allocated; to provide for Michigan transportation fund grants; to provide for review and approval of transportation programs; to provide for submission of annual legislative requests and reports; to provide for the establishment and functions of certain advisory entities; to provide for conditions for grants; to provide for the issuance of bonds and notes for transportation purposes; to provide for the powers and duties of certain state and local agencies and officials; to provide for the making of loans for transportation purposes by the state transportation department and for the receipt and repayment by local units and agencies of those loans from certain specified sources; and to repeal acts and parts of acts,” by amending section 11c (MCL 247.661c), as amended by 2002 PA 498.

The House of Representatives has passed the bill and ordered that it be given immediate effect.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Government Operations.

House Bill No. 4612, entitled

A bill to amend 1949 PA 300, entitled “Michigan vehicle code,” by amending section 801 (MCL 257.801), as amended by 2012 PA 498.

The House of Representatives has passed the bill and ordered that it be given immediate effect.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Government Operations.

House Bill No. 4613, entitled

A bill to amend 1951 PA 51, entitled “An act to provide for the classification of all public roads, streets, and highways in this state, and for the revision of that classification and for additions to and deletions from each classification; to set up and establish the Michigan transportation fund; to provide for the deposits in the Michigan transportation fund of specific taxes on motor vehicles and motor vehicle fuels; to provide for the allocation of funds from the Michigan transportation fund and the use and administration of the fund for transportation purposes; to promote safe and efficient travel for motor vehicle drivers, bicyclists, pedestrians, and other legal users of roads, streets, and highways; to set up and establish the truck safety fund; to provide for the allocation of funds from the truck safety fund and administration of the fund for truck safety purposes; to set up and establish the Michigan truck safety commission; to establish certain standards for road contracts for certain businesses; to provide for the continuing review of transportation needs within the state; to authorize the state transportation commission, counties, cities, and villages to borrow money, issue bonds, and make pledges of funds for transportation purposes; to authorize counties to advance funds for the payment of deficiencies necessary for the payment of bonds issued under this act; to provide for the limitations, payment, retirement, and security of the bonds and pledges; to provide for appropriations and tax levies by counties and townships for county roads; to authorize contributions by townships for county roads; to provide for the establishment and administration of the state trunk line fund, local bridge fund, comprehensive transportation fund, and certain other funds; to provide for the deposits in the state trunk line fund, critical bridge fund, comprehensive transportation fund, and certain other funds of money raised by specific taxes and fees; to provide for definitions of public transportation functions and criteria; to define the purposes for which Michigan transportation funds may be allocated; to provide for Michigan transportation fund grants; to provide for review and approval of transportation programs; to provide for submission of annual legislative requests and reports; to provide for the establishment and functions of certain advisory entities; to provide for conditions for grants; to provide for the issuance of bonds and notes for transportation purposes; to provide for the powers and duties of certain state and local agencies and officials; to provide for the making of loans for transportation purposes by the state transportation department and for the receipt and repayment by local units and agencies of those loans from certain specified sources; and to repeal acts and parts of acts,” by amending sections 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14 (MCL 247.660, 247.661, 247.662, 247.663, and 247.664), section 10 as amended by 2007 PA 210, section 11 as amended by 2002 PA 639, sections 12 and 13 as amended by 2012 PA 298, and section 14 as amended by 1987 PA 234.

The House of Representatives has passed the bill and ordered that it be given immediate effect.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Government Operations.

House Bill No. 4614, entitled

A bill to amend 2004 PA 175, entitled “Streamlined sales and use tax revenue equalization act,” by amending sections 3 and 5 (MCL 205.173 and 205.175).

The House of Representatives has passed the bill and ordered that it be given immediate effect.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Government Operations.

House Bill No. 4615, entitled

A bill to amend 2000 PA 403, entitled “Motor fuel tax act,” by amending sections 2, 3, 8, 22, 40, 45, 53, 63, 122, 151, 152, 153, 154, and 155 (MCL 207.1002, 207.1003, 207.1008, 207.1022, 207.1040, 207.1045, 207.1053, 207.1063, 207.1122, 207.1151, 207.1152, 207.1153, 207.1154, and 207.1155), sections 2 and 122 as amended by 2002 PA 668, section 3 as amended by 2006 PA 277, and section 8 as amended by 2006 PA 268.

The House of Representatives has passed the bill and ordered that it be given immediate effect.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Government Operations.

House Bill No. 4616, entitled

A bill to amend 1980 PA 119, entitled “Motor carrier fuel tax act,” by amending sections 1, 2, 2a, 4, 5, 6a, 8, 9, and 10 (MCL 207.211, 207.212, 207.212a, 207.214, 207.215, 207.216a, 207.218, 207.219, and 207.220), section 1 as amended by 2002 PA 667, sections 2 and 4 as amended by 2006 PA 346, section 2a as added by 1994 PA 353, section 5 as amended and section 6a as added by 1996 PA 584, and section 8 as amended by 2006 PA 449.

The House of Representatives has passed the bill and ordered that it be given immediate effect.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Government Operations.

By unanimous consent the Senate returned to the order of

General Orders

Senator Kowall moved that the Senate resolve itself into the Committee of the Whole for consideration of the General Orders calendar.

The motion prevailed, and the President, Lieutenant Governor Calley, designated Senator Young as Chairperson.

After some time spent therein, the Committee arose; and the President, Lieutenant Governor Calley, having resumed the Chair, the Committee reported back to the Senate, favorably and with a substitute therefor, the following bill:

Senate Bill No. 358, entitled

A bill to amend 1976 PA 451, entitled “The revised school code,” by amending sections 1531 and 1531i (MCL 380.1531 and 380.1531i), section 1531 as amended by 2007 PA 32 and section 1531i as added by 2009 PA 202.

Substitute (S-2).

The following are the amendments to the substitute recommended by the Committee of the Whole:

1. Amend page 6, line 2, after “examination.” by inserting “IF THE DEPARTMENT DEVELOPS FOR USE UNDER THIS SUBSECTION AN EXAMINATION THAT HAD PREVIOUSLY BEEN CONTRACTED FOR USING A COMPETITIVE BID PROCESS, THEN THE DEPARTMENT SHALL NOT EXPEND ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF THAT EXAMINATION AN AMOUNT THAT EXCEEDS THE AMOUNT THAT THE DEPARTMENT EXPENDED ON PROCUREMENT OF THE MOST RECENT COMPETITIVELY-BID VERSION OF THAT EXAMINATION.”.

2. Amend page 8, line 8, after “section.” by inserting “IF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION INCREASES A FEE CHARGED FOR AN EXAMINATION UNDER THIS SUBSECTION, AT LEAST 1 YEAR BEFORE IMPLEMENTING THE FEE INCREASE, THE DEPARTMENT SHALL NOTIFY EACH APPROVED TEACHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION OF THE AMOUNT OF THE FEE INCREASE. AN APPROVED TEACHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION SHALL NOTIFY EACH OF ITS AFFECTED STUDENTS OF THE TIMING AND AMOUNT OF SUCH A FEE INCREASE.”.

The Senate agreed to the substitute as amended recommended by the Committee of the Whole, and the bill as substituted was placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

The Committee of the Whole reported back to the Senate, favorably and with a substitute therefor, the following bill:

House Bill No. 4101, entitled

A bill to make, supplement, and adjust appropriations for various state departments and agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2015; and to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations.

Substitute (S-1).

The Senate agreed to the substitute recommended by the Committee of the Whole, and the bill as substituted was placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

Recess

Senator Kowall moved that the Senate recess subject to the call of the Chair.

The motion prevailed, the time being 11:13 a.m.

11:34 a.m.

The Senate was called to order by the President, Lieutenant Governor Calley.

By unanimous consent the Senate returned to the order of

Motions and Communications

Senator Kowall moved that the rules be suspended and that the following bill, now on Committee Reports, be placed on the General Orders calendar for consideration today:

House Bill No. 4052

The motion prevailed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

By unanimous consent the Senate returned to the order of

General Orders

Senator Kowall moved that the Senate resolve itself into the Committee of the Whole for consideration of the General Orders calendar.

The motion prevailed, and the President, Lieutenant Governor Calley, designated Senator Young as Chairperson.

After some time spent therein, the Committee arose; and the President, Lieutenant Governor Calley, having resumed the Chair, the Committee reported back to the Senate, favorably and with a substitute therefor, the following bill:

House Bill No. 4052, entitled

A bill to limit the powers of local governmental bodies regarding the regulation of terms and conditions of employment within local government boundaries for employees of nonpublic employers.

Substitute (S-1).

The Senate agreed to the substitute recommended by the Committee of the Whole, and the bill as substituted was placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

By unanimous consent the Senate returned to the order of

Third Reading of Bills

Senator Kowall moved that the rules be suspended and that the following bills, now on the order of Third Reading of Bills, be placed on their immediate passage:

House Bill No. 4101

House Bill No. 4052

The motion prevailed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

Senator Kowall moved that the following bills be placed at the head of the Third Reading of Bills calendar:

Senate Bill No. 209

Senate Bill No. 211

House Bill No. 4101

House Bill No. 4052

The motion prevailed.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 209, entitled

A bill to amend 1976 PA 451, entitled “The revised school code,” by amending section 1278 (MCL 380.1278), as amended by 2004 PA 596, and by adding sections 1167 and 1279h.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

Senator Knezek offered the following amendments:

1. Amend page 1, line 6, by striking out “THE CORE PRINCIPLES OF”.

2. Amend page 1, line 6, after “INDEPENDENCE” by striking out the comma and the balance of the subdivision and inserting a period.

3. Amend page 2, line 10, by striking out “CORE PRINCIPLES OF OUR”.

4. Amend page 2, line 10, after “CONSTITUTION” by striking out the comma and the balance of the subdivision and inserting a period.

5. Amend page 3, line 25, by striking out “THE CORE PRINCIPLES OF”.

6. Amend page 3, line 25, after “CONSTITUTION” by striking out the comma and the balance of the subdivision and inserting a period.

The amendments were not adopted, a majority of the members serving not voting therefor.

Senator Hood requested the yeas and nays.

The yeas and nays were ordered, 1/5 of the members present voting therefor.

The amendments were not adopted, a majority of the members serving not voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 284 Yeas—18

Ananich Hood Nofs Shirkey

Bieda Hopgood O’Brien Smith

Gregory Johnson Rocca Warren

Hansen Knezek Schuitmaker Young

Hertel Knollenberg

Nays—20

Booher Green Kowall Proos

Brandenburg Hildenbrand MacGregor Robertson

Casperson Horn Marleau Schmidt

Colbeck Hune Meekhof Stamas

Emmons Jones Pavlov Zorn

Excused—0

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: President

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 285 Yeas—27

Booher Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Brandenburg Horn Meekhof Schmidt

Casperson Hune Nofs Schuitmaker

Colbeck Jones O’Brien Shirkey

Emmons Knollenberg Pavlov Stamas

Green Kowall Proos Zorn

Hansen MacGregor Robertson

Nays—11

Ananich Hertel Johnson Warren

Bieda Hood Knezek Young

Gregory Hopgood Smith

Excused—0

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: President

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

Protests

Senators Knezek, Young, Johnson, Bieda, Gregory, Hopgood, Ananich, Hood, Smith and Hertel, under their constitutional right of protest (Art. 4, Sec. 18), protested against the passage of Senate Bill No. 209.

Senator Knezek’s statement, in which Senators Young, Johnson, Bieda, Gregory, Hopgood, Ananich, Hood, Smith and Hertel concurred, is as follows:

Again, I am deeply concerned, as are my colleagues, about the fact that we are picking and choosing in this chamber what it is about the United States Constitution, the Michigan Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence that is or is not important as it relates to the education of our children. I put forward a very simple, straightforward, and commonsense amendment that sought to ensure that the entirely of those documents is taught to our children. For whatever reason, that amendment was very narrowly defeated today.

I think it is important and incumbent for every one of us to think about when we talk about being prescriptive from Lansing and we talk about educating from the top down and enabling local control, and then do the exact opposite with legislation. What type of message does that send to our residents? What type of message does that send to the students who are the recipients and bear the burden of the legislation we pass here today?

I thank you for this opportunity to explain my “no” vote, and I thank my colleagues for their consideration.

Senator Knezek asked and was granted unanimous consent to make a statement and moved that the statement be printed in the Journal.

The motion prevailed.

Senator Knezek’s statement is as follows:

I had a number of remarks that I had prepared to share as it relates to my amendment, but I would like to thank the previous speaker for making all of my points for me. What is so dangerous about the bill as it is written is that it only asks and only delineates that we teach our students specific elements of the Declaration of Independence, specific elements of the Constitution, and specific elements of the Michigan Constitution.

I believe, and I know a number of us do, that in order to understand these very vital and important documents, it is important to understand them in their entirety. It should not be left up to the Michigan Senate as a body or to any one Senator to determine what aspects of the Constitution are more important than the others. If that is the approach that we want to take, let me point out the aspects of the Constitution that were left out of this bill that, apparently, are not important enough to be taught to our children.

This bill makes no mention to the Fourth Amendment that talks about illegal searches and seizures here in Michigan and the country. Again, in a time where we have seen the Fourth Amendment whittled away to almost nothing in this country, I cannot understand why we wouldn’t want to drive home the importance of that amendment to our children. This bill makes no mention to the Thirteenth Amendment which talks about the abolition of slavery. This bill makes no mention to the Fourteenth Amendment. It takes a five-section amendment and barrels it down to one section. The Fifteenth Amendment that talks about the right of U.S. citizens to vote is not made mention of either. Nor is the Nineteenth Amendment mentioned, which I imagine would be very important to a number of women in this room as well as the women across the state of Michigan.

So my amendment, quite simply, asks my colleagues on this side of the aisle and the other side to support a bill that doesn’t pick and choose which parts of the Constitution we want to teach our children. I am asking with this amendment that we teach our children the entire Declaration of Independence, the entire United States Constitution, and the entire Michigan Constitution.

The following bill was read a third time:

Senate Bill No. 211, entitled

A bill to amend 1976 PA 451, entitled “The revised school code,” (MCL 380.1 to 380.1852) by adding section 1168.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 286 Yeas—30

Ananich Hertel MacGregor Robertson

Booher Hildenbrand Marleau Rocca

Brandenburg Horn Meekhof Schmidt

Casperson Hune Nofs Schuitmaker

Colbeck Jones O’Brien Shirkey

Emmons Knezek Pavlov Stamas

Green Knollenberg Proos Zorn

Hansen Kowall

Nays—8

Bieda Hood Johnson Warren

Gregory Hopgood Smith Young

Excused—0

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: President

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

House Bill No. 4101, entitled

A bill to make, supplement, and adjust appropriations for various state departments and agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2015; and to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 287 Yeas—38

Ananich Hertel Kowall Rocca

Bieda Hildenbrand MacGregor Schmidt

Booher Hood Marleau Schuitmaker

Brandenburg Hopgood Meekhof Shirkey

Casperson Horn Nofs Smith

Colbeck Hune O’Brien Stamas

Emmons Johnson Pavlov Warren

Green Jones Proos Young

Gregory Knezek Robertson Zorn

Hansen Knollenberg

Nays—0

Excused—0

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: President

The question being on concurring in the committee recommendation to give the bill immediate effect,

The recommendation was concurred in, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

The following bill was read a third time:

House Bill No. 4052, entitled

A bill to limit the powers of local governmental bodies regarding the regulation of terms and conditions of employment within local government boundaries for employees of nonpublic employers.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

Senator Warren offered the following amendment:

1. Amend page 5, following line 22, by inserting:

“Sec. 18. This act does not prohibit the adoption, enforcement, or administration of a local ordinance approved by a majority of the electors voting on the ordinance.”.

The question being on the adoption of the amendment,

Recess

Senator Kowall moved that the Senate recess subject to the call of the Chair.

The motion prevailed, the time being 12:05 p.m.

12:18 p.m.

The Senate was called to order by the President, Lieutenant Governor Calley.

The amendment was not adopted, a majority of the members serving not voting therefor.

Senator Hood requested the yeas and nays.

The yeas and nays were ordered, 1/5 of the members present voting therefor.

The amendment was not adopted, a majority of the members serving not voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 288 Yeas—15

Ananich Hertel Knezek Smith

Bieda Hood Nofs Warren

Casperson Hopgood Rocca Young

Gregory Johnson Schuitmaker

Nays—23

Booher Hildenbrand MacGregor Robertson

Brandenburg Horn Marleau Schmidt

Colbeck Hune Meekhof Shirkey

Emmons Jones O’Brien Stamas

Green Knollenberg Pavlov Zorn

Hansen Kowall Proos

Excused—0

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: President

The President pro tempore, Senator Schuitmaker, assumed the Chair.

Senator Young offered the following amendment:

1. Amend page 3, line 1, by striking out all of section 4 and renumbering the remaining sections.

The amendment was not adopted, a majority of the members serving not voting therefor.

Senator Hood requested the yeas and nays.

The yeas and nays were ordered, 1/5 of the members present voting therefor.

The amendment was not adopted, a majority of the members serving not voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 289 Yeas—13

Ananich Hertel Johnson Smith

Bieda Hood Knezek Warren

Casperson Hopgood Rocca Young

Gregory

Nays—25

Booher Horn Marleau Robertson

Brandenburg Hune Meekhof Schmidt

Colbeck Jones Nofs Schuitmaker

Emmons Knollenberg O’Brien Shirkey

Green Kowall Pavlov Stamas

Hansen MacGregor Proos Zorn

Hildenbrand

Excused—0

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Schuitmaker

Senator Bieda offered the following amendment:

1. Amend page 1, line 3, by striking out all of section 2 and renumbering the remaining sections.

The amendment was not adopted, a majority of the members serving not voting therefor.

Senator Hood requested the yeas and nays.

The yeas and nays were ordered, 1/5 of the members present voting therefor.

The amendment was not adopted, a majority of the members serving not voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 290 Yeas—14

Ananich Hertel Knezek Smith

Bieda Hood Nofs Warren

Casperson Hopgood Rocca Young

Gregory Johnson

Nays—24

Booher Hildenbrand MacGregor Robertson

Brandenburg Horn Marleau Schmidt

Colbeck Hune Meekhof Schuitmaker

Emmons Jones O’Brien Shirkey

Green Knollenberg Pavlov Stamas

Hansen Kowall Proos Zorn

Excused—0

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Schuitmaker

Senator Casperson offered the following amendment:

1. Amend page 5, line 12, after “16.” by striking out “Subject to sections 6 to 12, this” and inserting “This”.

The amendment was not adopted, a majority of the members serving not voting therefor.

Senator Hood requested the yeas and nays.

The yeas and nays were ordered, 1/5 of the members present voting therefor.

The amendment was not adopted, a majority of the members serving not voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 291 Yeas—18

Ananich Hertel Knezek Smith

Bieda Hood Nofs Warren

Casperson Hopgood O’Brien Young

Emmons Johnson Rocca Zorn

Gregory Jones

Nays—20

Booher Hildenbrand MacGregor Robertson

Brandenburg Horn Marleau Schmidt

Colbeck Hune Meekhof Schuitmaker

Green Knollenberg Pavlov Shirkey

Hansen Kowall Proos Stamas

Excused—0

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Schuitmaker

Senator Hertel offered the following amendment:

1. Amend page 3, line 20, by striking out all of section 7 and renumbering the remaining sections.

The amendment was not adopted, a majority of the members serving not voting therefor.

Senator Hood requested the yeas and nays.

The yeas and nays were ordered, 1/5 of the members present voting therefor.

The amendment was not adopted, a majority of the members serving not voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 292 Yeas—15

Ananich Hertel Knezek Smith

Bieda Hood Nofs Warren

Casperson Hopgood O’Brien Young

Gregory Johnson Rocca

Nays—23

Booher Hildenbrand MacGregor Schmidt

Brandenburg Horn Marleau Schuitmaker

Colbeck Hune Meekhof Shirkey

Emmons Jones Pavlov Stamas

Green Knollenberg Proos Zorn

Hansen Kowall Robertson

Excused—0

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: Schuitmaker

Senator Stamas offered the following amendment:

1. Amend page 3, line 5, after “law.” by inserting “This section does not prohibit an ordinance, local policy, or local resolution requiring a criminal background check for an employee or potential employee in connection with the receipt of a license or permit from a local governmental body.”.

The amendment was adopted, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

Senator Casperson offered the following amendments:

1. Amend page 5, line 10, after “from” by striking out “adopting” and inserting “doing any of the following:

(a) Entering into or complying with an agreement with an owner, developer, contractor, or subcontractor receiving a grant, tax abatement, tax credit, or other remuneration from or through the local governmental body in connection with the provision of services to the local governmental body, which specifies the rights and responsibilities of the local governmental body and the owner, developer, contractor, or subcontractor, and the terms and conditions for the provision of services to the local governmental body.

(b) Adopting”.

2. Amend page 5, line 12, by striking out all of section 16 and renumbering the remaining section.

The amendments were not adopted, a majority of the members serving not voting therefor.

The Assistant President pro tempore, Senator O’Brien, assumed the Chair.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, as follows:

Roll Call No. 293 Yeas—22

Booher Hildenbrand MacGregor Robertson

Brandenburg Horn Marleau Schmidt

Colbeck Hune Meekhof Schuitmaker

Emmons Jones Pavlov Shirkey

Green Knollenberg Proos Stamas

Hansen Kowall

Nays—16

Ananich Hertel Knezek Smith

Bieda Hood Nofs Warren

Casperson Hopgood O’Brien Young

Gregory Johnson Rocca Zorn

Excused—0

Not Voting—0

In The Chair: O’Brien

The question being on concurring in the committee recommendation to give the bill immediate effect,

The recommendation was concurred in, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

The Senate agreed to the title of the bill.

Protests

Senators Young, Warren, Hood, Ananich, Casperson, Gregory and Bieda, under their constitutional right of protest (Art. 4, Sec. 18), protested against the passage of House Bill No. 4052.

Senators Young, Warren, Gregory and Bieda moved that the statements they made during the discussion of the bill be printed as their reasons for voting “no.”

The motion prevailed.

Senator Young’s statement is as follows:

I would like to begin with a quote: “I want the federal government to create a pilot project that would turn control of federal forestland over to local authorities. Those local officials are better equipped to make management decisions. We believe local control in this case and local management could do a better job because they know the local area, and they know the land better.” That is my colleague from the 11th District extolling the virtues of local control.

Another thing he said was that he wants legislation to allow localities and local governments to choose to become right-to-work zones as alternatives to the debate over whether Michigan should be a right-to-work state. “This could be used as sort of a test model”—have to watch out for those test models; it’s code for garbage—“to see what interest there is at the local level.” That was my colleague from the 13th District.

I would like to give you another quote: “The EAA solidifies our plans for rescuing these children while including local control options, oversight, and parameters to ensure students are getting the best education possible.” That was my colleague in the House, a member of the majority caucus.

Here is my colleague from the 7th District: “I am opposed to any state mandate that local school districts must open their district to students from other districts. My preference is for local control. We elect local school boards to make these decisions based on what is best for a given community.”

Colleagues, I have one simple question: Why? If local control is so important to you—and it must be because you use it as the reason for passing so much of your legislation—why then do you now want to gut local control with this bill? It seems to me you were either dishonest then, or you’re being dishonest now. Either way, it’s shameful; it’s cynical. It’s not what we were sent here to do. I oppose this blatant power grab, and I encourage you to do the same.

I am sick and tired of these folks who haven’t lived in Detroit since Reagan was President, since clear Pepsi was a thing, and since Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch were tearing up the music charts. He wants to come in and tell me how to run my district and tell me how my city should operate. These guys don’t know what they are talking about. I look at some of these guys and think of Betamax—they still make you? These guys are like Morse Code in a Samsung Galaxy universe. I don’t even know why we pay these people attention, let alone take up their bills. They don’t know what they are talking about.

I would rather have someone strip my clothes until I am wearing nothing but a Speedo, douse me in honey, and throw me in a pit of bears than to vote for this trash. That is all this is. It is garbage that will not do anything for anyone in any community. It is taking rights from my constituents. My constituents have negotiated for 10 years for a community business agreement just for clean air, just a pot to pee in, and a window to throw it out. Now you are going to come and take that away from them. Have you no shame? I have bills that we can pass if you just want to do some things to pass the time, if you aren’t serious about dumping this.

I oppose this blatant power grab and encourage you all to do the same.

Senator Warren’s statement, in which Senators Hood, Ananich and Casperson concurred, is as follows:

I rise to provide my “no” vote explanation for House Bill No. 4052. As you have probably gathered by the comments I have already made today, I do serve on the Michigan Competitiveness Committee which had an 8:30 hearing this morning on this legislation. In doing my preparation this morning for committee, I have been thinking a lot about the resolutions that are introduced and passed here in the Legislature, seemingly daily/weekly, telling Washington that we as states are not a cookie cutter and urging the federal branch to let us decide what is right for our citizens and our state. This thought led me to Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 12, sponsored by the good Senator from the 16th District and chair of the Michigan Competitiveness Committee and co‑sponsored by all of his colleagues in committee and by many in this chamber.

The thrust of the resolution is to urge the United States Supreme Court to recognize its limited historic role in a federal system and to urge the states to become proactive in defending their sovereignty against federal overreach. More specifically, though, the fifth Whereas clause is what really drew my attention, and it reads as follows: “This arrangement of federalism best meets the needs of the states which often vary in customs and values and which are in a position to best understand the needs and desires of their own citizens. Altering wrongs on the part of government is much more easily accomplished at the state level than at the federal level.”

What really struck me about this clause was that you could very easily substitute local in place of state, and it would still hold true. Just as we are arguably closer to our constituents and our state needs than our federal counterparts, our local electeds and certainly the people themselves are uniquely positioned to understand the varying needs and fundamental values of their communities.

We have offered some amendments today to try to make this legislation a little more palatable for our local communities, but the truth is this is flawed legislation. It interferes with our local governments’ most basic functions and, in many cases, overturns local ordinances approved by the voters, circumventing the will of the people. It has been so broadly and poorly written that it stands to create myriad unintended consequences for local governments and citizens across our state. It essentially guts the processes and policies many local communities have had in place for decades.

Perhaps the most insulting thing about this legislation is that it deigns to suggest that those of us in this room know what is best for diverse communities across the state, from Ann Arbor to Baraga to Muskegon to Kalamazoo. We know from our collective experience that a one-size-fits-all approach cannot work, and the travesty of this legislation is that it forces on all of our communities while insinuating that Lansing knows best. Well, I think you can knock on just about anyone’s door in our state nowadays, and they will tell you Lansing does not know best.

I urge you to join me in rejecting this dangerous legislation. Let’s stop interfering in local business, and allow our local governments to do their jobs while we take care of the many issues we have at hand. I think we all know there are more than enough to keep us busy all summer.

Senator Gregory’s statement is as follows:

I stand for a “no” vote explanation on this House Bill No. 4052. Colleagues, I rise to oppose this sweeping and problematic legislation before us that would eliminate our local government’s ability to set ordinances for businesses in their area. A wide array of organizations oppose this legislation and for the very same reasons that I do.

First and foremost, this bill eliminates local control. At its base, this bill is a big-government takeover that trumps local elected officials and any decisions that they make. As a former county commissioner, I find this very offensive. It is telling our local businesses that they don’t know what is best for their communities and you do, and that Big Brother state government knows best. So often I hear my colleagues on the other side of the aisle talk about local control and how the Legislature should trust local governments with local issues. So where are they today?

The impact of this bill is as bad as the intent. Around the state and throughout our districts, there are currently important and effective local ordinances that could be wiped out in one fell swoop with this bill. What about all of the open and accepting local communities that have passed ordinances against workplace discrimination due to a person’s sexual orientation or gender identity? Those, too, could be wiped out or at least rendered useless as this bill strategically includes enough language to say this is addressed but still dilutes any actually enforcement to do it. So will local laws that ensure community residents receive benefits for public works projects that affect their homes and interfere with their lives, like we have been discussing for years as part of the NITC bridge between Detroit and Windsor. Local ordinances to promote paid sick leave and prevailing wage could also be gone. Local efforts to promote the hiring of veterans could also be gone. This bill would undermine all local issues whether you support them or not. It will hurt your local governments, businesses, employees, and constituents, as well as mine.

This is just scratching the surface of the damage this bill could do, but it is already enough justification to oppose this bill. I urge all of my colleagues to join me today in standing up for local governments and local control, ending this government overreach before it starts, and oppose this bill.

Senator Bieda’s statement is as follows:

I rise to oppose this bill. I am reminded, when I think of local control, of a phrase popularized by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis in the case New State Ice Company v. Liebmann. For those of you who suffered along with me in law school, you may remember this case. The term “laboratories of democracy” was quoted. That term kind of defines how states may, if its citizens choose, serve as a laboratory and try novel, social, and economic experiments without risk to the rest of the country. This concept explains how within the federal framework, there exists a system of state autonomy where state and local governments act as social laboratories; where laws and policies are treated and tested at the state level in the democratic system in a manner similar to a scientific method. The Tenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution provides that all powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited, are reserved to the states, respectively to the people. This is the basis for the laboratories of democracy concept because the Tenth Amendment assigns most day-to-day government responsibilities, including general police powers, to the state and local governments. Because there are fifty states, different policies can be enacted and tested at the state level without directly impacting the entire country. As a result, a diverse patchwork of state level government practices has been created.

This is similar to what we have in the state of Michigan. When we talk about local control, we take a look at each of those communities. Those people are closest to that level of government, and they are the closest to the citizens. They are in a better position to put together a system of laws that impact values for the local economy and values of the communities.

Therefore, as I rise to oppose House Bill No. 4052, I recognize that is an assault on our state’s local governments and their ability to establish local laws. Let’s review. This wide-reaching bill was rushed out of the Senate committee today with very little debate and little acknowledgment of its flaws and opposition. As the Michigan Competitiveness Committee chair from the 16th District witnessed this morning, there were myriad organizations that oppose this bill, but the bill passed out of committee anyway.

Amendments by my colleagues that were intended to improve this bill were defeated, and opposition from the committee was quickly dismissed. But as an olive branch offered up at the end of committee, the chair told the room that we were going to continue the discussion on this bill and that he would be willing to work together to improve it. Now, just a few hours later, this bill is being rammed through the full Senate and fast-tracked into law. Apparently, by “discussion,” the chair meant allowing us to give a few “no” vote explanations before the bill passed.

Passing this bad legislation that hurts our local governments, businesses, workers, and constituents is one thing, but doing so with such limited debate adds insult to injury. This bill is moving so fast that I don’t think you have even begun to comprehend the consequences that are going to arise, but I assure you they are there.

If this bill becomes law, I think every day you will realize the error of your ways and see more problems caused by this legislation. Just as we saw with the fireworks law and other bills, hasty legislation leads to constant revisions. You have to reopen the same acts over and over again to make corrections to bills because its supporters didn’t fully understand their impact; also because their local governments and their constituents, the people we most directly represent, raise their concerns. If we truly want to embrace compromise and debate this bill, then let’s hold off on passing it for, say, more than three hours.

I oppose this bill and I oppose the way it’s being rushed through. I hope you will join me in supporting the continued debate these important issues demand by opposing these bills.

Senators Zorn and O’Brien moved that they be permitted to submit in writing their reasons for voting “no” for inclusion in a subsequent Journal.

The motion prevailed.

Senators Bieda and Schuitmaker asked and were granted unanimous consent to make statements and moved that the statements be printed in the Journal.

The motion prevailed.

Senator Bieda’s statement is as follows:

This simple amendment would strike out a section of the bill that sets forth legislative findings regarding the employment relationship between nonpublic employers and employees. A little bit of history on this bill: Not only was it rammed through committee this morning without giving the minority vice chair a real opportunity to speak on it, but it also contains language that sets forth legislative findings without any real testimony, discussion, study, or debate. I think that is something that should give us all great pause.

At the federal level, there is a congressional finding, or legislative finding, that oftentimes takes weeks of analysis, extensive testimony, and oftentimes in-depth discussion on an issue. I think that this is something that we really need to look at very carefully if we’re going to be honest about what we have in this bill. It really doesn’t add anything to it, but it is dishonest having it in there.

Many legal scholars caution against the general use of these findings, including Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia who points out that so-called legislative intent is often used by proponents of legislation to persuade a court to interpret a statute in a manner that was not agreed to by the legislative body. That is not the way we should be approaching the work we do in this chamber. Since courts may use legislative intent to interpret statutes that are ambiguous or questionable, it is important that we take the time to get it right.

As Senators, we have a constitutional duty that we all have been entrusted with, a tremendous responsibility to carefully craft policies that affect millions of Michigan residents. Personally, as an attorney, it is especially important to me that we take the time and care to ensure that this process is thoughtful and honest and that the language we include in our legislation is meaningful. To me, it undermines the integrity of this process when we rush bills through the process and simply insert legislative findings without actually making those findings. This language is simply not honest.

If there is a real consensus on a topic we feel strongly about, we should have no problem taking the time and care to vet the issue through the committee process and through discussion and debate on the floor. Let’s take a minute to be really thoughtful about the way we use legislative findings, rather than simply adding them to bills as an afterthought. To do anything less strikes me as dishonest and disrespects the service we were elected to perform. I ask my colleagues for your support for this amendment.

Senator Schuitmaker’s statement is as follows:

I rise in support of House Bill No. 4052. Over the last several years, hundreds of thousands of jobs have been created as businesses located or expanded here in Michigan. If there was one thing I heard on the campaign trail, it was create jobs. As local governments attempt to pass more and more burdensome regulations and a patchwork of rules for private businesses, we are in danger of driving those very jobs out as employers are forced to decide whether it is worth it to stay.

Let’s get government out of the way. This is especially true for some of our largest employers who may have multiple locations throughout the state. It is bad for business and bad for Michigan, and it will only hinder growth to have a patchwork of regulations and burdensome rules for these businesses.

Job creators need certainty and predictability when deciding where to invest capital that creates good-paying jobs for our Michigan families. This bill ensures that businesses will continue to locate and expand here in Michigan, and jobs will continue to be created.

By unanimous consent the Senate returned to the order of

Messages from the House

Senator Kowall moved that rule 3.202 be suspended to permit immediate consideration of the following bill:

Senate Bill No. 217

The motion prevailed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

Senate Bill No. 217, entitled

A bill to amend 1893 PA 206, entitled “The general property tax act,” by amending sections 7dd and 7jj (MCL 211.7dd and 211.7jj[1]), section 7dd as amended by 2013 PA 44 and section 7jj as amended by 2013 PA 42.

The House of Representatives has substituted (H-1) the bill.

The House of Representatives has passed the bill as substituted (H-1), ordered that it be given immediate effect and pursuant to Joint Rule 20, inserted the full title.

The question being on concurring in the substitute made to the bill by the House,

Senator Kowall moved that further consideration of the bill be postponed for today.

The motion prevailed.

By unanimous consent the Senate proceeded to the order of

Resolutions

Senator Kowall moved that consideration of the following concurrent resolution be postponed for today:

House Concurrent Resolution No. 3

The motion prevailed.

Senator Emmons offered the following resolution:

Senate Resolution No. 69.

A resolution to commemorate June 10, 2015, as Dairy Foods Awareness Day.

Whereas, There are approximately 1,700 Grade A dairy farms in Michigan and 390,000 dairy cows, representing approximately 2,000 dairy herds. Dairy cows in Michigan produced approximately 9.6 billion pounds of milk. Michigan ranked 7th in milk production in the U.S., producing 4.4 percent of the nation’s milk. The dairy industry in Michigan contributes $14.7 billion to the state’s economy. The average Michigan cow produces approximately 24,638 pounds of milk each year, which is 2,865 gallons of milk a year, or more than 8 gallons of milk every day of each cow’s milking period. According to the USDA, 98 percent of U.S. dairy farms are family owned and operated, sometimes by multiple generations of a family; and

Whereas, The mission of the Michigan Dairy Foods Association is to support and promote activities designed to improve and maintain the general well-being of the dairy processing industry; and

Whereas, The Michigan Dairy Foods Association is a trade and membership service organization representing all aspects of the dairy processing industry in Michigan. The association’s primary purposes are to assure that a strong environment exists for the creation and maintenance of sound public policy as it relates to all aspects of the dairy processing industry in Michigan; to enhance the position, prestige, and competitive ability of the association’s members; and to provide educational programs to enhance the members’ abilities to process and market fine dairy products, packaged waters, and juices in Michigan and throughout the world; and

Whereas, Dairy Foods Awareness Day was established by the Michigan Dairy Foods Association to demonstrate the importance of the dairy processing industry in Michigan and to promote the 3-A-Day concept of three servings of calcium-rich dairy products per day, which helps ensure a healthy diet. We salute the people of the Michigan Dairy Foods Association for their efforts to expand our awareness and knowledge of the dairy processing industry; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the Senate, That the members of this legislative body commemorate June 10, 2015, as Dairy Foods Awareness Day in the state of Michigan; and be it further

Resolved, That a copy of this resolution be transmitted to the organizers of Dairy Foods Awareness Day as evidence of our esteem.

Pending the order that, under rule 3.204, the resolution be referred to the Committee on Government Operations,

Senator Kowall moved that the rule be suspended.

The motion prevailed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

The resolution was adopted.

Senators Bieda, Booher, Brandenburg, Green, Gregory, Hansen, Hopgood, Knollenberg, Kowall, MacGregor, Marleau, O’Brien, Pavlov, Proos, Robertson, Stamas and Zorn were named co‑sponsors of the resolution.

Senator Proos offered the following resolution:

Senate Resolution No. 70.

A resolution to recognize June 15-21, 2015, as Men’s Health Week and June 15, 2015, as Blue Monday.

Whereas, The top causes of death in American men are heart disease at 25.4 percent and cancer at 24.1 percent, and 1 in 6 American men will develop prostate cancer in their lifetime; and

Whereas, More than half of all premature deaths among American men are preventable, and only 30 percent of men’s health factors are genetic, while 70 percent are environmental; and

Whereas, Almost twice as many men as women die as a result of injuries and violence each year, and the three leading causes of death from injuries for men are road traffic injuries, suicide, and homicide; and

Whereas, The purpose of Men’s Health Week is to heighten the awareness of preventable health problems and encourage early detection and treatment of disease among men and boys; and

Whereas, This week gives health care providers, public policy makers, the media, and all individuals an opportunity to encourage men and boys to seek regular medical advice and early treatment for disease and injury; and

Whereas, Blue Monday is a day to promote and kick off Men’s Health Week, endorse men’s health engagement, education, and advocacy, and demonstrate a dedicated interest in the men’s health movement; and

Whereas, As part of Blue Monday, men, women, and children who wish to support the men in their lives are asked to dress in blue, and men are encouraged to plan exercise or a healthful activity to be a part of that day; and

Whereas, Businesses, corporations, and community organizations are asked to embrace Blue Monday as part of their culture, joining employees together to support the cause; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the Senate, That the members of this legislative body recognize June 15-21, 2015, as Men’s Health Week and June 15, 2015, as Blue Monday in the state of Michigan. We strongly urge all citizens to increase their knowledge of men’s health issues as well as disease and injury prevention.

Pending the order that, under rule 3.204, the resolution be referred to the Committee on Government Operations,

Senator Kowall moved that the rule be suspended.

The motion prevailed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

The resolution was adopted.

Senators Bieda, Booher, Brandenburg, Emmons, Gregory, Hansen, Knollenberg, Marleau, O’Brien, Stamas and Zorn were named co‑sponsors of the resolution.

Senators Johnson, Hood, Jones, Gregory, Knezek, Hopgood, Smith, Ananich, Hertel and Warren offered the following resolution:

Senate Resolution No. 71.

A resolution to memorialize the Congress of the United States to pass H.R. 1807 of 2015, the Sickle Cell Disease Research, Surveillance, Prevention, and Treatment Act of 2015.

Whereas, Sickle cell disease in an inherited lifelong condition in which the body makes an altered form of hemoglobin resulting in abnormal, crescent-shaped red blood cells. The side effects of sickle cell disease include shortened life expectancy, chronic pain episodes, strokes, acute chest syndrome, organ damage, vision loss, and infections; and

Whereas, Sickle cell disease disproportionately impacts African Americans. There are significant ethnic and racial disparities within the United States health care system that has impacted the manner in which research funding has been directed toward effective treatment methods and the pursuit of a potential cure for this disease; and

Whereas, Coverage for treatment of sickle cell disease drops after the age of 19. Comprehensive medical services for adults with sickle cell disease is inadequate and fragmented. Many adults with sickle cell disease rely excessively on emergency room care to treat chronic pain; and

Whereas, H.R. 1807 strives to increase funding for research and surveillance on sickle cell disease, improve awareness, and increase access to treatment of sickle cell disease. The legislation also seeks to identify strategies for the prevention and treatment of sickle cell disease; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the Senate, That we memorialize the Congress of the United States to pass H.R. 1807 of 2015, the Sickle Cell Disease, Research, Surveillance, Prevention, and Treatment Act of 2015; and be it further

Resolved, That copies of this resolution be transmitted to the President of the United States Senate, the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, and the members of the Michigan congressional delegation

Pending the order that, under rule 3.204, the resolution be referred to the Committee on Government Operations,

Senator Kowall moved that the rule be suspended.

The motion prevailed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

The question being on the adoption of the resolution,

Senator Kowall moved that the resolution be referred to the Committee on Health Policy.

The motion prevailed.

By unanimous consent the Senate returned to the order of

Introduction and Referral of Bills

Senator Ananich introduced

Senate Bill No. 398, entitled

A bill to amend 1978 PA 368, entitled “Public health code,” (MCL 333.1101 to 333.25211) by adding section 5427.

The bill was read a first and second time by title and referred to the Committee on Health Policy.

Statements

Senator Bieda asked and was granted unanimous consent to make a statement and moved that the statement be printed in the Journal.

The motion prevailed.

Senator Bieda’s statement is as follows:

I would like to speak to two important anniversaries. One of them is for a constituent of mine who will be turning 101 years old this Saturday, June 13. She lives in Fraser, and she has been very active in the Fraser Library Club. Her name is Eleanor Skubick. If that name sounds familiar, she is the mother of our capitol correspondent, Tim Skubick. I hope you will join me in wishing her a great 101st birthday celebration.

The other anniversary I would like to address comes this Monday, June 15, and it marks the 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta. We had a little bit of a history debate going on earlier today, but I think we will all agree that the Magna Carta, which is Latin for “The Great Charter” and is also referred to as the “The Great Charter of the Liberties,” is a very important document in the creation of some of the liberties that we have in our Constitution and in our country.

The Magna Carta was a charter agreed to by King John of England at Runnymede near Windsor on June 15, 1215. First drafted by the Archbishop of Canterbury to make peace between the unpopular king and a group of rebel barons, it promised the protection of church rights, protection for the barons from illegal imprisonment, access to swift justice, and limitations on feudal payments to the Crown, to be implemented through a council of 25 barons.

The charter became part of English political life and was typically renewed by each monarch in turn, although as time went by and the fledgling English Parliament passed new laws, it lost some of its practical significance. At the end of the 16th century, there was an upsurge in interest in the Magna Carta. Lawyers and historians at the time believed that there was an ancient English constitution, going back to the days of the Anglo-Saxons, that protected individual English freedoms. They argued that the Norman invasion of 1066 had overthrown these rights, and the Magna Carta had been a popular attempt to restore them, making the charter an essential foundation for the contemporary powers of Parliament and legal principles such as habeas corpus. Although this historical account was badly flawed, jurists such as Sir Edward Coke used the Magna Carta extensively in the early 17th century, arguing against the divine right of kings propounded by the Stuart monarchs. Both James I and his son Charles I attempted to suppress the discussion of the Magna Carta until the issue was curtailed by the English Civil War of the 1640s and the execution of Charles.

The political myth of the Magna Carta and its protection of ancient personal liberties persisted after the Glorious Revolution of 1688 until well into the 19th century. It influenced the early American colonists in the thirteen colonies and the formation of the American Constitution in 1789, which became the supreme law of the land in the new republic of the United States. Research by Victorian historians showed that the original 1215 charter had concerned the medieval relationship between the monarch and the barons, rather than the rights of ordinary people. But the charter remained a powerful, iconic document even after almost all of its content was repealed from the statute books in the 19th and 20th centuries.

The Magna Carta still forms an important symbol of liberty today, often cited by politicians and campaigners and is held in great respect by the British and American legal communities. Lord Denning described it as “the greatest constitutional document of all times—the foundation of the freedom of the individual against the arbitrary authority of the despot.”

It is an important anniversary. I thought it would be appropriate that we mark this. It will be this Monday, June 15, and it’s the 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta.

Committee Reports

The Committee on Judiciary reported

Senate Bill No. 332, entitled

A bill to amend 1998 PA 58, entitled “Michigan liquor control code of 1998,” by amending section 703 (MCL 436.1703), as amended by 2012 PA 125.

With the recommendation that the substitute (S-2) be adopted and that the bill then pass.

The committee further recommends that the bill be given immediate effect.

Rick Jones

Chairperson

To Report Out:

Yeas: Senators Jones, Rocca, Colbeck and Bieda

Nays: None

The bill and the substitute recommended by the committee were referred to the Committee of the Whole.

The Committee on Judiciary reported

Senate Bill No. 333, entitled

A bill to amend 1949 PA 300, entitled “Michigan vehicle code,” by amending section 319 (MCL 257.319), as amended by 2015 PA 11.

With the recommendation that the substitute (S-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.

The committee further recommends that the bill be given immediate effect.

Rick Jones

Chairperson

To Report Out:

Yeas: Senators Jones, Rocca, Colbeck and Bieda

Nays: None

The bill and the substitute recommended by the committee were referred to the Committee of the Whole.

The Committee on Judiciary reported

House Bill No. 4463, entitled

A bill to amend 1927 PA 175, entitled “The code of criminal procedure,” by amending section 37 of chapter XVII (MCL 777.37), as amended by 2002 PA 137.

With the recommendation that the bill pass.

The committee further recommends that the bill be given immediate effect.

Rick Jones

Chairperson

To Report Out:

Yeas: Senators Jones, Rocca, Colbeck and Bieda

Nays: None

The bill was referred to the Committee of the Whole.

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

The Committee on Judiciary submitted the following:

Meeting held on Tuesday, June 9, 2015, at 3:30 p.m., Room 110, Farnum Building

Present: Senators Jones (C), Schuitmaker, Rocca, Colbeck and Bieda

The Committee on Government Operations reported

House Bill No. 4122, entitled

A bill to amend 1984 PA 270, entitled “Michigan strategic fund act,” by amending section 29h (MCL 125.2029h), as amended by 2014 PA 396.

With the recommendation that the substitute (S-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.

The committee further recommends that the bill be given immediate effect.

Arlan B. Meekhof

Chairperson

To Report Out:

Yeas: Senators Meekhof, Hansen and Kowall

Nays: Senators Ananich and Hood

The bill and the substitute recommended by the committee were referred to the Committee of the Whole.

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

The Committee on Government Operations submitted the following:

Meeting held on Tuesday, June 9, 2015, at 4:00 p.m., Senate Appropriations Room, 3rd Floor, Capitol Building

Present: Senators Meekhof (C), Hansen, Kowall, Ananich and Hood

The Committee on Regulatory Reform reported

Senate Bill No. 184, entitled

A bill to amend 1990 PA 271, entitled “Limousine transportation act,” by amending the title and sections 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 14, 15, 17, 19, 21, 23, 25, 27, 29, 31, and 37 (MCL 257.1903, 257.1905, 257.1907, 257.1911, 257.1913, 257.1914, 257.1915, 257.1917, 257.1919, 257.1921, 257.1923, 257.1925, 257.1927, 257.1929, 257.1931, and 257.1937), section 7 as amended by 2000 PA 487, and by adding section 8.

With the recommendation that the substitute (S-5) be adopted and that the bill then pass.

The committee further recommends that the bill be given immediate effect.

Tory Rocca

Chairperson

To Report Out:

Yeas: Senators Rocca, Jones, Hune, Warren, Hertel and Johnson

Nays: Senator Kowall

The bill and the substitute recommended by the committee were referred to the Committee of the Whole.

The Committee on Regulatory Reform reported

Senate Bill No. 188, entitled

A bill to amend 1990 PA 271, entitled “Limousine transportation act,” by amending the title and sections 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 19, 21, 23, 25, 27, 29, 31, 33, 35, and 37 (MCL 257.1903, 257.1905, 257.1907, 257.1909, 257.1911, 257.1913, 257.1919, 257.1921, 257.1923, 257.1925, 257.1927, 257.1929, 257.1931, 257.1933, 257.1935, and 257.1937), section 7 as amended by 2000 PA 487, by designating sections 3 to 39 as article 1, and by adding article 2.

With the recommendation that the substitute (S-5) be adopted and that the bill then pass.

The committee further recommends that the bill be given immediate effect.

Tory Rocca

Chairperson

To Report Out:

Yeas: Senators Rocca, Jones, Hune, Warren, Hertel and Johnson

Nays: Senator Kowall

The bill and the substitute recommended by the committee were referred to the Committee of the Whole.

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

The Committee on Regulatory Reform submitted the following:

Meeting held on Wednesday, June 10, 2015, at 1:00 p.m., Senate Hearing Room, Ground Floor, Boji Tower

Present: Senators Rocca (C), Jones, Knollenberg, Kowall, Marleau, Hune, Warren, Hertel and Johnson

The Committee on Appropriations reported

Senate Bill No. 21, entitled

A bill to amend 1986 PA 182, entitled “State police retirement act of 1986,” by amending section 40a (MCL 38.1640a), as amended by 1996 PA 201.

With the recommendation that the bill pass.

The committee further recommends that the bill be given immediate effect.

David S. Hildenbrand

Chairperson

To Report Out:

Yeas: Senators Hildenbrand, MacGregor, Hansen, Stamas, Schuitmaker, Knollenberg, Booher, Proos, Nofs, Green, Marleau, Gregory, Hopgood, Hertel, Knezek and Young

Nays: None

The bill was referred to the Committee of the Whole.

The Committee on Appropriations reported

Senate Bill No. 22, entitled

A bill to amend 1986 PA 182, entitled “State police retirement act of 1986,” (MCL 38.1601 to 38.1648) by adding section 40c.

With the recommendation that the substitute (S-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.

The committee further recommends that the bill be given immediate effect.

David S. Hildenbrand

Chairperson

To Report Out:

Yeas: Senators Hildenbrand, MacGregor, Hansen, Stamas, Schuitmaker, Knollenberg, Booher, Proos, Nofs, Green, Marleau, Gregory, Hopgood, Hertel, Knezek and Young

Nays: None

The bill and the substitute recommended by the committee were referred to the Committee of the Whole.

The Committee on Appropriations reported

House Bill No. 4101, entitled

A bill to make, supplement, and adjust appropriations for various state departments and agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2015; and to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations.

With the recommendation that the substitute (S-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.

The committee further recommends that the bill be given immediate effect.

David S. Hildenbrand

Chairperson

To Report Out:

Yeas: Senators Hildenbrand, MacGregor, Hansen, Stamas, Schuitmaker, Knollenberg, Booher, Shirkey, Proos, Nofs, Green, Marleau, Gregory, Hopgood, Hertel, Knezek and Young

Nays: None

The bill and the substitute recommended by the committee were referred to the Committee of the Whole.

The Committee on Appropriations reported

House Bill No. 4496, entitled

A bill to amend 2005 PA 92, entitled “School bond qualification, approval, and loan act,” by amending section 3 (MCL 388.1923), as amended by 2012 PA 437.

With the recommendation that the bill pass.

The committee further recommends that the bill be given immediate effect.

David S. Hildenbrand

Chairperson

To Report Out:

Yeas: Senators Hildenbrand, MacGregor, Hansen, Stamas, Schuitmaker, Knollenberg, Booher, Shirkey, Proos, Nofs, Green, Marleau, Gregory, Hopgood, Hertel, Knezek and Young

Nays: None

The bill was referred to the Committee of the Whole.

The Committee on Appropriations reported

House Bill No. 4497, entitled

A bill to amend 2005 PA 92, entitled “School bond qualification, approval, and loan act,” by amending section 7 (MCL 388.1927), as amended by 2012 PA 437.

With the recommendation that the bill pass.

The committee further recommends that the bill be given immediate effect.

David S. Hildenbrand

Chairperson

To Report Out:

Yeas: Senators Hildenbrand, MacGregor, Hansen, Stamas, Schuitmaker, Knollenberg, Booher, Shirkey, Proos, Nofs, Green, Marleau, Gregory, Hopgood, Hertel, Knezek and Young

Nays: None

The bill was referred to the Committee of the Whole.

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

The Committee on Appropriations submitted the following:

Meeting held on Wednesday, June 10, 2015, at 2:00 p.m., Senate Appropriations Room, 3rd Floor, Capitol Building

Present: Senators Hildenbrand (C), MacGregor, Hansen, Stamas, Schuitmaker, Knollenberg, Booher, Shirkey, Proos, Nofs, Green, Marleau, Gregory, Hopgood, Hertel, Knezek and Young

The Committee on Michigan Competitiveness reported

House Bill No. 4052, entitled

A bill to limit the powers of local governmental bodies regarding the regulation of terms and conditions of employment within local government boundaries for employees of nonpublic employers.

With the recommendation that the substitute (S-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.

The committee further recommends that the bill be given immediate effect.

Mike Shirkey

Chairperson

To Report Out:

Yeas: Senators Shirkey, Stamas, Robertson and Proos

Nays: Senator Warren

The bill and the substitute recommended by the committee were referred to the Committee of the Whole.

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

The Committee on Michigan Competitiveness submitted the following:

Meeting held on Thursday, June 11, 2015, at 8:30 a.m., Senate Hearing Room, Ground Floor, Boji Tower

Present: Senators Shirkey (C), Stamas, Robertson, Proos and Warren

Scheduled Meetings

Administrative Rules - Wednesday, June 17, 9:00 a.m., Room 426, Capitol Building (373-5773)

Commerce - Wednesday, June 17, 8:00 a.m., Room 110, Farnum Building (373-5312)

Education - Tuesday, June 16, 8:30 a.m. and Thursday, June 18, 12:00 noon, Room 110, Farnum Building (373-5314)

Finance - Tuesdays, June 16 and June 23 (CANCELED), 8:30 a.m., Room 210, Farnum Building (373-5312)

Senator Kowall moved that the Senate adjourn.

The motion prevailed, the time being 1:37 p.m.

The Assistant President pro tempore, Senator O’Brien, declared the Senate adjourned until Tuesday, June 16, 2015, at 10:00 a.m.

JEFFREY F. COBB

Secretary of the Senate

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