SR-100, As Adopted by Senate, December 13, 2007

 

 

            Senators Allen, Richardville, Birkholz, Garcia, Pappageorge, Kahn, Hardiman, Jelinek, Gilbert, Van Woerkom, Patterson, Cropsey, McManus, Cassis, Kuipers, Jansen, Olshove, Jacobs, Stamas, Brown, Cherry, Barcia, Switalski, Gleason, Whitmer, Sanborn and Bishop offered the following resolution:

            Senate Resolution No. 100.

            A resolution to urge the United States Department of Defense to accept records of state screening for post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injuries in the absence of a federal screening record.

            Whereas, Combat veterans of Iraq, Afghanistan, and other locations face two long-term health problems stemming from the length of duty and the weapons our enemies use. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental health form of a combat wound recognized since our Civil War. Prolonged exposure to combat is the cause of this disorder, which can plague veterans long after they return from war if not treated. Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) result from blast effects inflicted by improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and mines encountered during combat operations. TBI is being called the signature injury of the campaign in Iraq and is sometimes confused with PTSD; and

            Whereas, Early treatment of both PTSD and TBI is necessary to prevent these injuries from growing worse. Early treatment may be difficult to provide when symptoms may not appear for years after the event. The military has recognized the importance of screening for these injuries and educating military personnel and their families about the symptoms of PTSD and TBI and the need to quickly seek treatment when the injuries are recognized. The military has implemented post-deployment screening and rescreening questionnaires that are part of the medical records of all military personnel. If a veteran later develops symptoms of either PTSD or TBI after completing military service, these records will be key to ensuring prompt and appropriate treatment at Veterans Affairs medical facilities; and

            Whereas, These records will be of great value moving forward, but past veterans of Iraq, Afghanistan, and other places may not have adequate screening documents as part of their records. If a state seeks to fill gaps in medical records for current National Guard members released from federal service prior to obtaining a full screening or for residents released from military service without a proper screening, these state-administered screening records should be accepted by the Department of Defense. With appropriate standards regarding the screening questions and processing that the department may wish to establish, these state-based screenings should be considered a valid part of the medical records of that veteran or member of the National Guard; now, therefore, be it

            Resolved by the Senate, That we urge the United States Department of Defense to accept records of state screening for post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injuries in the absence of a federal screening record; and be it further

            Resolved, That copies of this resolution be transmitted to the Secretary of the Department of Defense and the members of the Michigan congressional delegation.