No. 59

STATE OF MICHIGAN

JOURNAL

OF THE

House of Representatives

99th Legislature

REGULAR SESSION OF 2018

House Chamber, Lansing, Tuesday, June 12, 2018.

10:00 a.m.

The House was called to order by the Speaker Pro Tempore.

The roll was called by the Clerk of the House of Representatives, who announced that a quorum was present.

Afendoulis—present Frederick—present Kelly—present Reilly—present

Albert—present Garcia—present Kesto—present Rendon—present

Alexander—present Garrett—present Kosowski—present Roberts—present

Allor—present Gay-Dagnogo—present LaFave—present Robinson—present

Barrett—present Geiss—present LaGrand—present Runestad—present

Bellino—present Glenn—present LaSata—present Sabo—present

Bizon—present Graves—present Lasinski—present Santana—present

Brann—present Green—present Lauwers—present Scott—present

Brinks—present Greig—present Leonard—present Sheppard—present

Byrd—present Greimel—present Leutheuser—present Singh—present

Calley—present Griffin—present Liberati—present Sneller—present

Cambensy—present Guerra—present Lilly—present Sowerby—present

Camilleri—present Hammoud—present Love—present Tedder—present

Canfield—present Hauck—present Lower—present Theis—present

Chang—present Hernandez—present Lucido—present VanderWall—present

Chatfield—present Hertel—present Marino—present VanSingel—present

Chirkun—present Hoadley—present Maturen—present Vaupel—present

Clemente—present Hoitenga—present McCready—present VerHeulen—present

Cochran—present Hornberger—present Miller—present Victory—present

Cole—present Howell—present Moss—present Webber—present

Cox—present Howrylak—present Neeley—present Wentworth—present

Crawford—present Hughes—present Noble—present Whiteford—present

Dianda—present Iden—present Pagan—present Wittenberg—present

Durhal—present Inman—present Pagel—present Yancey—present

Elder—present Johnson—present Peterson—present Yanez—present

Ellison—present Jones—present Phelps—e/d/s Yaroch—present

Faris—present Kahle—present Rabhi—present Zemke—present

Farrington—present

e/d/s = entered during session

Rev. Frank Snyder, Chaplain of the Michigan State Police Post in Marshall, offered the following invocation:

“Dear Heavenly Father,

What a privilege to stand before these who have the divinely ordained responsibility of governance. I thank You for their willingness to serve in a task that subjects them to criticism from the outside and relational friction on the inside. Differences in political philosophies and viewpoints make complete agreement difficult. But we know that it is sometimes in the heat of disagreement that new and better solutions are forged. Give each the humility of mind that acknowledges the possibility of error on their part and help them to listen to one another.

We thank You for these that make our laws. We also thank You for those who enforce our laws. They are sworn to serve and protect and they secure the very place we are gathered in today. We pray Your protective hand over and upon them. Help us to realize that we are all here to serve and protect. So, as these folks here today get down to business, help them to realize that they are an assemblage of guardians who are entrusted with the task to govern wisely.

I thank You that we live in a country where government exists by the consent of the governed. I am grateful that this is collegial and not paternal and a system where individual liberties are precious. This is especially true in regard to our perception of and our interaction with You. We thank You that we do not have a government that mandates how we are to pray or even that we pray.

We thank You for the liberty to love and adore You and the freedom to approach You as we perceive and understand You. Help every resident of our great state to treasure that right for themselves and respect it for others. And it is in that precious liberty before this august and respected body that I come to You and ask these things in the name of my Lord and my Savior, Jesus Christ.

Amen.”

Motions and Resolutions

Reps. Lilly, Garcia, Allor, Chirkun, Cochran, Green, Greig, Hoadley, Howrylak, Kelly, Marino, Phelps, Sabo and Sneller offered the following resolution:

House Resolution No. 368.

A resolution to declare June 13, 2018, as USCGC Escanaba Day in the state of Michigan.

Whereas, The USCGC Escanaba, a 165’ “A” class cutter, built in Bay City, Michigan in 1932, was named after a city and river in the state of Michigan; and

Whereas, The ship was stationed at Station Grand Haven for duty and service on the Great Lakes from 1932 to 1941. It provided lifesaving, light ice breaking, and law enforcement services to the residents and visitors to the area. The cutter saved the crew of the lake freighter SS Henry Cort after the freighter ran aground at Muskegon Michigan, as well as the lives of many others; and

Whereas, A future USCG Commandant, Admiral Edwin J. Roland (Ret.) served as gunnery officer and navigation officer from 1932-1934; and

Whereas, The people of Grand Haven and the surrounding area grew to admire and respect the crew and ship, as they became a part of the Grand Haven community; and

Whereas, The ship was deployed to the North Atlantic to provide escort protection as part of the Greenland Patrol at the outbreak of WWII in 1941. She provided search and rescue and weather station patrols and deployed the first known use of the “Rescue Swimmer” saving many lives; and

Whereas, On June 13, 1943, at 0517 hours while on patrol in the North Atlantic, a major explosion occurred on board the ship resulting in the loss of the ship and 103 officers and men and only 2 survived; and

Whereas, The loss of the ship deeply affected the people of the Grand Haven community. One million dollars in bonds was raised for a new ship. They placed the mast and lifeboat in the park named in honor of the ship and the officers and men who served aboard her and hold a memorial service in Escanaba Park every year during the Coast Guard Festival; and

Whereas, The USCGC Escanaba (WMEC-907) faithfully carries on the traditions and duties of its namesake; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That the members of this legislative body declare June 13, 2018, as USCGC Escanaba Day in the state of Michigan; and be it further

Resolved, That copies of this resolution be transmitted to the City of Ferrysburg, the City of Grand Haven, and the Village of Spring Lake with our highest esteem.

The question being on the adoption of the resolution,

The resolution was adopted.

Reps. Singh, Chang, Chirkun, Clemente, Cochran, Faris, Gay-Dagnogo, Geiss, Green, Greig, Hoadley, Jones, Love, Pagan, Phelps, Sabo, Sneller, Sowerby and Wittenberg offered the following resolution:

House Resolution No. 369.

A resolution to declare June 21, 2018, as International Day of Yoga in the state of Michigan.

Whereas, In 2014, the United Nations General Assembly declared June 21 as the International Day of Yoga. During his address to the General Assembly in support of declaring the global celebration, the Prime Minister of India, Narendra Modi, observed, “Yoga is an invaluable gift of India’s ancient tradition. It embodies unity of mind and body; thought and action; restraint and fulfillment; harmony between man and nature; a holistic approach to health and well-being. It is not about exercise, but to discover the sense of oneness with yourself, the world and the nature”; and

Whereas, The word “yoga” is derived from the Sanskrit word “yuj,” which means “to unite or integrate,” and one objective of a yoga practice is to harmonize the body, spirit, and mind through various breathing exercises, yoga poses (also called asanas), and meditation. Yoga may be used to discover a sense of oneness and connection within oneself, other people, the world, nature, and the universe; and

Whereas, Michigan is home to many yoga teachers, students, studios, and classes that have collectively contributed to the significant growth of yoga throughout the United States. A 2016 study conducted by yoga trade leaders estimated there are 36.7 million people currently practicing yoga in the United States, an increase from 20.4 million in 2012; and

Whereas, Founded in 1981 by Sri Sri Ravishankar, The Art of Living Foundation (AOLF) is an international, non-profit, educational and humanitarian organization and one of the largest volunteer-based organizations. It is active in over 150 countries and focuses on human development, stress management, and uplifting human values through a diverse offering of programs and community service, including participating in major disaster and trauma relief efforts globally; and

Whereas, The Art of Living Foundation aims to unite with community members and organizations across the globe to celebrate the International Day of Yoga; and

Whereas, The Art of Living-Michigan Chapter, with the goal of making the greater Michigan community a more healthy, peaceful and harmonious state that will set an example for the entire nation, is organizing International Day of Yoga celebrations in the month of June in various cities across Michigan; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That the members of this legislative body declare June 21, 2018, as International Day of Yoga in the state of Michigan.

The question being on the adoption of the resolution,

Rep. Singh moved to substitute (H-1) the resolution as follows:

Substitute for House Resolution No. 369.

A resolution to declare June 21, 2018, as International Day of Yoga in the state of Michigan.

Whereas, In 2014, the United Nations General Assembly declared June 21 as the International Day of Yoga. During his address to the General Assembly in support of declaring the global celebration, the Prime Minister of India, Narendra Modi, observed, “Yoga is an invaluable gift of India’s ancient tradition. It embodies unity of mind and body; thought and action; restraint and fulfillment; harmony between man and nature; a holistic approach to health and well-being. It is not about exercise, but to discover the sense of oneness with yourself, the world and the nature”; and

Whereas, The word “yoga” is derived from the Sanskrit word “yuj,” which means “to unite or integrate,” and one objective of a yoga practice is to harmonize the body, spirit, and mind through various breathing exercises, yoga poses (also called asanas), and meditation. Yoga may be used to discover a sense of oneness and connection within oneself, other people, the world, nature, and the universe; and

Whereas, Michigan is home to many yoga teachers, students, studios, and classes that have collectively contributed to the significant growth of yoga throughout the United States. A 2016 study conducted by yoga trade leaders estimated there are 36.7 million people currently practicing yoga in the United States, an increase from 20.4 million in 2012; and

Whereas, The Art of Living Foundation aims to unite with community members and organizations across the globe to celebrate the International Day of Yoga, and its Michigan Chapter seeks to make the greater Michigan community a more healthy, peaceful and harmonious state that will set an example for the entire nation by organizing International Day of Yoga celebrations in the month of June in various cities across the state of Michigan; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That the members of this legislative body declare June 21, 2018, as International Day of Yoga in the state of Michigan.

The motion prevailed and the substitute (H-1) was adopted, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

The question being on the adoption of the resolution,

The resolution was adopted.

Reps. Farrington, Allor, Brinks, Chang, Clemente, Cochran, Faris, Geiss, Green, Greig, Hoadley, Jones, Kelly, Liberati, Love, Marino, Phelps, Sabo and Wittenberg offered the following resolution:

House Resolution No. 370.

A resolution to declare July 2018 as Craft Beer Month in the state of Michigan.

Whereas, Michigan craft brewers are a vibrant affirmation and expression of Michigan’s entrepreneurial traditions, operate as community-based small businesses, and provide employment for more than 14,000 workers; and

Whereas, Michigan has craft brewers in every region of the state and more than 300 craft brewers statewide; and

Whereas, Michigan ranks fifth in the nation for overall number of breweries, microbreweries, and brewpubs; and

Whereas, The Michigan Brewers Guild celebrates Michigan Craft Beer Month each year by hosting a Summer Festival in July; and

Whereas, Craft brewers in Michigan support state agriculture by purchasing hops, malted barley, wheat, beet sugar, cherries, apples, and numerous other fruits, herbs, spices, and vegetables grown in Michigan; and

Whereas, Michigan craft brewers promote Michigan’s spirit of independence through a renaissance in handcrafted beers like those first brought to Michigan by European settlers and produced here by our forefathers, including Bernhard Stroh, for the enjoyment of the citizenry; and

Whereas, Striving to educate legal drinking-age residents, Michigan craft brewers convey awareness about the differences in beer flavor, aroma, color, alcohol content, body, and other complex variables, beer history, and gastronomic qualities of beer; and

Whereas, Michigan craft brewers champion the message of responsible enjoyment to their customers and work within their communities to prevent alcohol abuse and underage drinking; and

Whereas, Craft brewers in Michigan produce more than 100 distinct styles of flavorful beers, the quality and diversity of which have made Michigan the envy of many states, contributing to balanced trade with increased Michigan exports and promoting Michigan tourism; and

Whereas, Michigan craft brewers have been a successful business model during our state’s economic struggles by contributing more than $600 million in labor income with a total economic contribution of more than $2 billion, thriving and expanding in furthering their economic importance to the state; and

Whereas, Michigan craft brewers are vested in the future, health, and welfare of their communities as employers providing a diverse array of quality local jobs. They are contributors to the local tax base and are committed sponsors of a broad range of vital community institutions and philanthropic causes, including not-for-profit housing development associations, chambers of commerce, humane societies, athletic teams, and medical research; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That the members of this legislative body declare July 2018 as Craft Beer Month in the state of Michigan. We recognize the contributions that Michigan craft brewers have made to the state’s communities, economy, and history; and be it further

Resolved, That we commend Michigan craft brewers for providing jobs, improving the balance of trade, supporting Michigan agriculture, and educating residents about the history and culture of beer while promoting the responsible consumption of beer as a beverage of moderation.

The question being on the adoption of the resolution,

The resolution was adopted.

Reps. Chatfield, Chirkun, Cochran, Green, Jones, Kelly, Marino and Phelps offered the following resolution:

House Resolution No. 371.

A resolution to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Great Union of Romania.

Whereas, In 2018 Romanians all across the United States celebrate 100 years since the Great Union of Romanians, which led to the consolidation of a modern state inspired by the principles of freedom, democracy, economic liberty and social progress; and

Whereas, The United States and Romania share a deep and longstanding friendship built around democratic values, historical ties, and a joint commitment to advancing the strength of transatlantic security and the promise of their mutual prosperity; and

Whereas, The talent, energy and creativity of successive generations of Romanian-Americans, their rich cultural heritage and their contributions to American progress represent a most precious feature of the American society; and

Whereas, Ties between Michigan and Romania are increasingly more diverse due to an expansion in bilateral trade, educational programs, and the advent of an open community of American and Romanian youth who engage freely in innovation and entrepreneurship; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, The members of this legislative body commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Great Union of Romania. We congratulate Romania, the Romanian people, and all Romanian-Americans in the state of Michigan and commend Romania for her achievements as a vibrant nation and for being a close and trusted friend of the United States.

The question being on the adoption of the resolution,

The resolution was adopted.

Reports of Standing Committees

The Speaker laid before the House

House Concurrent Resolution No. 23.

A concurrent resolution to urge the Congress and President of the United States to take certain actions to counter manipulation of the oil market by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries.

(For text of concurrent resolution, see House Journal No. 38, p. 678.)

(The concurrent resolution was reported by the Committee on Energy Policy on June 5.)

The question being on the adoption of the concurrent resolution,

The concurrent resolution was adopted.

Third Reading of Bills

Senate Bill No. 988, entitled

A bill to amend 1939 PA 280, entitled “The social welfare act,” by amending section 117a (MCL 400.117a), as amended by 2018 PA 22.

Was read a third time and passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

Roll Call No. 459 Yeas—108

Afendoulis Farrington Kahle Reilly

Albert Frederick Kelly Rendon

Alexander Garcia Kesto Roberts

Allor Garrett Kosowski Robinson

Barrett Gay-Dagnogo LaFave Runestad

Bellino Geiss LaGrand Sabo

Bizon Glenn LaSata Santana

Brann Graves Lasinski Scott

Brinks Green Lauwers Sheppard

Byrd Greig Leonard Singh

Calley Greimel Leutheuser Sneller

Cambensy Griffin Liberati Sowerby

Camilleri Guerra Lilly Tedder

Canfield Hammoud Love Theis

Chang Hauck Lower VanderWall

Chatfield Hernandez Lucido VanSingel

Chirkun Hertel Marino Vaupel

Clemente Hoadley Maturen VerHeulen

Cochran Hoitenga McCready Victory

Cole Hornberger Miller Webber

Cox Howell Moss Wentworth

Crawford Howrylak Neeley Whiteford

Dianda Hughes Noble Wittenberg

Durhal Iden Pagan Yancey

Elder Inman Pagel Yanez

Ellison Johnson Peterson Yaroch

Faris Jones Rabhi Zemke

Nays—0

In The Chair: Chatfield

Pursuant to Joint Rule 20, the full title of the act shall be inserted to read as follows:

“An act to protect the welfare of the people of this state; to provide general assistance, hospitalization, infirmary and medical care to poor or unfortunate persons; to provide for compliance by this state with the social security act; to provide protection, welfare and services to aged persons, dependent children, the blind, and the permanently and totally disabled; to administer programs and services for the prevention and treatment of delinquency, dependency and neglect of children; to create a state department of social services; to prescribe the powers and duties of the department; to provide for the interstate and intercounty transfer of dependents; to create county and district departments of social services; to create within certain county departments, bureaus of social aid and certain divisions and offices thereunder; to prescribe the powers and duties of the departments, bureaus and officers; to provide for appeals in certain cases; to prescribe the powers and duties of the state department with respect to county and district departments; to prescribe certain duties of certain other state departments, officers, and agencies; to make an appropriation; to prescribe penalties for the violation of the provisions of this act; and to repeal certain parts of this act on specific dates,”

The House agreed to the full title.

Rep. Lauwers moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

Senate Bill No. 1015, entitled

A bill to amend 1978 PA 368, entitled “Public health code,” by amending section 20161 (MCL 333.20161), as amended by 2016 PA 189.

Was read a third time and passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

Roll Call No. 460 Yeas—108

Afendoulis Farrington Kahle Reilly

Albert Frederick Kelly Rendon

Alexander Garcia Kesto Roberts

Allor Garrett Kosowski Robinson

Barrett Gay-Dagnogo LaFave Runestad

Bellino Geiss LaGrand Sabo

Bizon Glenn LaSata Santana

Brann Graves Lasinski Scott

Brinks Green Lauwers Sheppard

Byrd Greig Leonard Singh

Calley Greimel Leutheuser Sneller

Cambensy Griffin Liberati Sowerby

Camilleri Guerra Lilly Tedder

Canfield Hammoud Love Theis

Chang Hauck Lower VanderWall

Chatfield Hernandez Lucido VanSingel

Chirkun Hertel Marino Vaupel

Clemente Hoadley Maturen VerHeulen

Cochran Hoitenga McCready Victory

Cole Hornberger Miller Webber

Cox Howell Moss Wentworth

Crawford Howrylak Neeley Whiteford

Dianda Hughes Noble Wittenberg

Durhal Iden Pagan Yancey

Elder Inman Pagel Yanez

Ellison Johnson Peterson Yaroch

Faris Jones Rabhi Zemke

Nays—0

In The Chair: Chatfield

Pursuant to Joint Rule 20, the full title of the act shall be inserted to read as follows:

“An act to protect and promote the public health; to codify, revise, consolidate, classify, and add to the laws relating to public health; to provide for the prevention and control of diseases and disabilities; to provide for the classification, administration, regulation, financing, and maintenance of personal, environmental, and other health services and activities; to create or continue, and prescribe the powers and duties of, departments, boards, commissions, councils, committees, task forces, and other agencies; to prescribe the powers and duties of governmental entities and officials; to regulate occupations, facilities, and agencies affecting the public health; to regulate health maintenance organizations and certain third party administrators and insurers; to provide for the imposition of a regulatory fee; to provide for the levy of taxes against certain health facilities or agencies; to promote the efficient and economical delivery of health care services, to provide for the appropriate utilization of health care facilities and services, and to provide for the closure of hospitals or consolidation of hospitals or services; to provide for the collection and use of data and information; to provide for the transfer of property; to provide certain immunity from liability; to regulate and prohibit the sale and offering for sale of drug paraphernalia under certain circumstances; to provide for the implementation of federal law; to provide for penalties and remedies; to provide for sanctions for violations of this act and local ordinances; to provide for an appropriation and supplements; to repeal certain acts and parts of acts; to repeal certain parts of this act; and to repeal certain parts of this act on specific dates,”

The House agreed to the full title.

Rep. Lauwers moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

______

The Speaker Pro Tempore called Associate Speaker Pro Tempore Glenn to the Chair.

House Bill No. 5955, entitled

A bill to limit the authority of political subdivisions to impose licensing regulation.

Was read a third time and passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

Roll Call No. 461 Yeas—58

Afendoulis Garcia LaFave Rendon

Albert Glenn LaSata Roberts

Alexander Graves Lauwers Runestad

Allor Griffin Leonard Sheppard

Barrett Hauck Leutheuser Tedder

Bellino Hernandez Lilly Theis

Bizon Hoitenga Lower VanderWall

Brann Hornberger Lucido VanSingel

Calley Hughes Marino Vaupel

Canfield Iden Maturen VerHeulen

Chatfield Inman Miller Victory

Cole Johnson Noble Webber

Cox Kahle Pagel Wentworth

Crawford Kelly Reilly Whiteford

Farrington Kesto

Nays—50

Brinks Frederick Jones Robinson

Byrd Garrett Kosowski Sabo

Cambensy Gay-Dagnogo LaGrand Santana

Camilleri Geiss Lasinski Scott

Chang Green Liberati Singh

Chirkun Greig Love Sneller

Clemente Greimel McCready Sowerby

Cochran Guerra Moss Wittenberg

Dianda Hammoud Neeley Yancey

Durhal Hertel Pagan Yanez

Elder Hoadley Peterson Yaroch

Ellison Howell Rabhi Zemke

Faris Howrylak

In The Chair: Glenn

The House agreed to the title of the bill.

Rep. Lauwers moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

______

Rep. Howrylak, having reserved the right to explain his protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

This bill is a solution in search of a problem. It is blunt and not specific. If anything, it should be pruned and refined, with an intent to protect local control. Decisions made at the local level are those that best reflect the will of the community.”

Rep. Geiss, having reserved the right to explain her protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

Prior to today, 54 bills have been introduced since 2013 that erode local control. This set of 11 bills to prohibit local units of government from imposing licensing requirements on specific occupations if they do not already do so brings the number of local government pre-emption bills to 65. Prohibiting local government from doing its job is not the role of state government. According to Thomas Jefferson, ‘The government closest to the people, serves the people best.’ The government that is closest to the people is local government and pre-emption bills like this prevent locally elected leaders from serving their people best. Lansing has no business creating pre-emptive language for local government and prohibiting the elected leaders of local units of government from enacting its own ordinances, regulations, resolutions and polices. This legislature’s continual infringement upon the power of local elected leaders to make the decisions they believe serve their communities best is disrespectful and short-sighted.”

House Bill No. 5956, entitled

A bill to amend 1846 RS 16, entitled “Of the powers and duties of townships, the election and duties of township officers, and the division of townships,” (MCL 41.1a to 41.110c) by adding section 3b.

Was read a third time and passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

Roll Call No. 462 Yeas—58

Afendoulis Garcia LaFave Rendon

Albert Glenn LaSata Roberts

Alexander Graves Lauwers Runestad

Allor Griffin Leonard Sheppard

Barrett Hauck Leutheuser Tedder

Bellino Hernandez Lilly Theis

Bizon Hoitenga Lower VanderWall

Brann Hornberger Lucido VanSingel

Calley Hughes Marino Vaupel

Canfield Iden Maturen VerHeulen

Chatfield Inman Miller Victory

Cole Johnson Noble Webber

Cox Kahle Pagel Wentworth

Crawford Kelly Reilly Whiteford

Farrington Kesto

Nays—50

Brinks Frederick Jones Robinson

Byrd Garrett Kosowski Sabo

Cambensy Gay-Dagnogo LaGrand Santana

Camilleri Geiss Lasinski Scott

Chang Green Liberati Singh

Chirkun Greig Love Sneller

Clemente Greimel McCready Sowerby

Cochran Guerra Moss Wittenberg

Dianda Hammoud Neeley Yancey

Durhal Hertel Pagan Yanez

Elder Hoadley Peterson Yaroch

Ellison Howell Rabhi Zemke

Faris Howrylak

In The Chair: Glenn

The House agreed to the title of the bill.

Rep. Lauwers moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

______

Rep. Howrylak, having reserved the right to explain his protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

This bill is a solution in search of a problem. It is blunt and not specific. If anything, it should be pruned and refined, with an intent to protect local control. Decisions made at the local level are those that best reflect the will of the community.”

Rep. Geiss, having reserved the right to explain her protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

Prior to today, 54 bills have been introduced since 2013 that erode local control. This set of 11 bills to prohibit local units of government from imposing licensing requirements on specific occupations if they do not already do so brings the number of local government pre-emption bills to 65. Prohibiting local government from doing its job is not the role of state government. According to Thomas Jefferson, ‘The government closest to the people, serves the people best.’ The government that is closest to the people is local government and pre-emption bills like this prevent locally elected leaders from serving their people best. Lansing has no business creating pre-emptive language for local government and prohibiting the elected leaders of local units of government from enacting its own ordinances, regulations, resolutions and polices. This legislature’s continual infringement upon the power of local elected leaders to make the decisions they believe serve their communities best is disrespectful and short-sighted.”

Rep. Yaroch, having reserved the right to explain his protest against passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

I voted ‘no’ on this bill package in order to protect local government’s ability to regulate occupations which the State of Michigan have not addressed.”

House Bill No. 5957, entitled

A bill to amend 1909 PA 278, entitled “The home rule village act,” by amending section 24 (MCL 78.24), as amended by 2012 PA 11.

Was read a third time and passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

Roll Call No. 463 Yeas—58

Afendoulis Garcia LaFave Rendon

Albert Glenn LaSata Roberts

Alexander Graves Lauwers Runestad

Allor Griffin Leonard Sheppard

Barrett Hauck Leutheuser Tedder

Bellino Hernandez Lilly Theis

Bizon Hoitenga Lower VanderWall

Brann Hornberger Lucido VanSingel

Calley Hughes Marino Vaupel

Canfield Iden Maturen VerHeulen

Chatfield Inman Miller Victory

Cole Johnson Noble Webber

Cox Kahle Pagel Wentworth

Crawford Kelly Reilly Whiteford

Farrington Kesto

Nays—50

Brinks Frederick Jones Robinson

Byrd Garrett Kosowski Sabo

Cambensy Gay-Dagnogo LaGrand Santana

Camilleri Geiss Lasinski Scott

Chang Green Liberati Singh

Chirkun Greig Love Sneller

Clemente Greimel McCready Sowerby

Cochran Guerra Moss Wittenberg

Dianda Hammoud Neeley Yancey

Durhal Hertel Pagan Yanez

Elder Hoadley Peterson Yaroch

Ellison Howell Rabhi Zemke

Faris Howrylak

In The Chair: Glenn

The House agreed to the title of the bill.

Rep. Lauwers moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

______

Rep. Howrylak, having reserved the right to explain his protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

House Bills 5955-5965 represent a solution in search of a problem. The proposed legislative action is blunt and not specific. If anything, it should be pruned and refined, with an intent to protect local control. Decisions made at the local level are those that best reflect the will of the community.”

Rep. Geiss, having reserved the right to explain her protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

Prior to today, 54 bills have been introduced since 2013 that erode local control. This set of 11 bills to prohibit local units of government from imposing licensing requirements on specific occupations if they do not already do so brings the number of local government pre-emption bills to 65. Prohibiting local government from doing its job is not the role of state government. According to Thomas Jefferson, ‘The government closest to the people, serves the people best.’ The government that is closest to the people is local government and pre-emption bills like this prevent locally elected leaders from serving their people best. Lansing has no business creating pre-emptive language for local government and prohibiting the elected leaders of local units of government from enacting its own ordinances, regulations, resolutions and polices. This legislature’s continual infringement upon the power of local elected leaders to make the decisions they believe serve their communities best is disrespectful and short-sighted.”

Rep. Yaroch, having reserved the right to explain his protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

I voted ‘no’ on this bill package in order to protect local government’s ability to regulate occupations which the State of Michigan have not addressed.”

House Bill No. 5958, entitled

A bill to amend 1945 PA 246, entitled “An act to authorize township boards to adopt ordinances and regulations to secure the public health, safety and general welfare; to provide for the establishment of a township police department; to provide for policing of townships by certain law enforcement officers and agencies; to provide for the publication of ordinances; to prescribe powers and duties of township boards and certain local and state officers and agencies; to provide sanctions; and to repeal all acts and parts of acts in conflict with the act,” by amending section 1 (MCL 41.181), as amended by 2012 PA 9.

Was read a third time and passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

Roll Call No. 464 Yeas—58

Afendoulis Garcia LaFave Rendon

Albert Glenn LaSata Roberts

Alexander Graves Lauwers Runestad

Allor Griffin Leonard Sheppard

Barrett Hauck Leutheuser Tedder

Bellino Hernandez Lilly Theis

Bizon Hoitenga Lower VanderWall

Brann Hornberger Lucido VanSingel

Calley Hughes Marino Vaupel

Canfield Iden Maturen VerHeulen

Chatfield Inman Miller Victory

Cole Johnson Noble Webber

Cox Kahle Pagel Wentworth

Crawford Kelly Reilly Whiteford

Farrington Kesto

Nays—50

Brinks Frederick Jones Robinson

Byrd Garrett Kosowski Sabo

Cambensy Gay-Dagnogo LaGrand Santana

Camilleri Geiss Lasinski Scott

Chang Green Liberati Singh

Chirkun Greig Love Sneller

Clemente Greimel McCready Sowerby

Cochran Guerra Moss Wittenberg

Dianda Hammoud Neeley Yancey

Durhal Hertel Pagan Yanez

Elder Hoadley Peterson Yaroch

Ellison Howell Rabhi Zemke

Faris Howrylak

In The Chair: Glenn

The House agreed to the title of the bill.

Rep. Lauwers moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

______

Rep. Howrylak, having reserved the right to explain his protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

House Bills 5955-5965 represent a solution in search of a problem. The proposed legislative action is blunt and not specific. If anything, it should be pruned and refined, with an intent to protect local control. Decisions made at the local level are those that best reflect the will of the community.”

Rep. Geiss, having reserved the right to explain her protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

Prior to today, 54 bills have been introduced since 2013 that erode local control. This set of 11 bills to prohibit local units of government from imposing licensing requirements on specific occupations if they do not already do so brings the number of local government pre-emption bills to 65. Prohibiting local government from doing its job is not the role of state government. According to Thomas Jefferson, ‘The government closest to the people, serves the people best.’ The government that is closest to the people is local government and pre-emption bills like this prevent locally elected leaders from serving their people best. Lansing has no business creating pre-emptive language for local government and prohibiting the elected leaders of local units of government from enacting its own ordinances, regulations, resolutions and polices. This legislature’s continual infringement upon the power of local elected leaders to make the decisions they believe serve their communities best is disrespectful and short-sighted.”

House Bill No. 5959, entitled

A bill to amend 1947 PA 359, entitled “The charter township act,” by amending section 15 (MCL 42.15).

Was read a third time and passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

Roll Call No. 465 Yeas—58

Afendoulis Garcia LaFave Rendon

Albert Glenn LaSata Roberts

Alexander Graves Lauwers Runestad

Allor Griffin Leonard Sheppard

Barrett Hauck Leutheuser Tedder

Bellino Hernandez Lilly Theis

Bizon Hoitenga Lower VanderWall

Brann Hornberger Lucido VanSingel

Calley Hughes Marino Vaupel

Canfield Iden Maturen VerHeulen

Chatfield Inman Miller Victory

Cole Johnson Noble Webber

Cox Kahle Pagel Wentworth

Crawford Kelly Reilly Whiteford

Farrington Kesto

Nays—50

Brinks Frederick Jones Robinson

Byrd Garrett Kosowski Sabo

Cambensy Gay-Dagnogo LaGrand Santana

Camilleri Geiss Lasinski Scott

Chang Green Liberati Singh

Chirkun Greig Love Sneller

Clemente Greimel McCready Sowerby

Cochran Guerra Moss Wittenberg

Dianda Hammoud Neeley Yancey

Durhal Hertel Pagan Yanez

Elder Hoadley Peterson Yaroch

Ellison Howell Rabhi Zemke

Faris Howrylak

In The Chair: Glenn

The House agreed to the title of the bill.

Rep. Lauwers moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

______

Rep. Howrylak, having reserved the right to explain his protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

House Bills 5955-5965 represent a solution in search of a problem. The proposed legislative action is blunt and not specific. If anything, it should be pruned and refined, with an intent to protect local control. Decisions made at the local level are those that best reflect the will of the community.”

Rep. Geiss, having reserved the right to explain her protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

Prior to today, 54 bills have been introduced since 2013 that erode local control. This set of 11 bills to prohibit local units of government from imposing licensing requirements on specific occupations if they do not already do so brings the number of local government pre-emption bills to 65. Prohibiting local government from doing its job is not the role of state government. According to Thomas Jefferson, ‘The government closest to the people, serves the people best.’ The government that is closest to the people is local government and pre-emption bills like this prevent locally elected leaders from serving their people best. Lansing has no business creating pre-emptive language for local government and prohibiting the elected leaders of local units of government from enacting its own ordinances, regulations, resolutions and polices. This legislature’s continual infringement upon the power of local elected leaders to make the decisions they believe serve their communities best is disrespectful and short-sighted.”

Rep. Yaroch, having reserved the right to explain his protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

I voted ‘no’ on this bill package in order to protect local government’s ability to regulate occupations which the State of Michigan have not addressed.”

House Bill No. 5960, entitled

A bill to amend 1909 PA 279, entitled “The home rule city act,” by amending section 4i (MCL 117.4i), as amended by 2017 PA 214.

Was read a third time and passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

Roll Call No. 466 Yeas—58

Afendoulis Garcia LaFave Rendon

Albert Glenn LaSata Roberts

Alexander Graves Lauwers Runestad

Allor Griffin Leonard Sheppard

Barrett Hauck Leutheuser Tedder

Bellino Hernandez Lilly Theis

Bizon Hoitenga Lower VanderWall

Brann Hornberger Lucido VanSingel

Calley Hughes Marino Vaupel

Canfield Iden Maturen VerHeulen

Chatfield Inman Miller Victory

Cole Johnson Noble Webber

Cox Kahle Pagel Wentworth

Crawford Kelly Reilly Whiteford

Farrington Kesto

Nays—50

Brinks Frederick Jones Robinson

Byrd Garrett Kosowski Sabo

Cambensy Gay-Dagnogo LaGrand Santana

Camilleri Geiss Lasinski Scott

Chang Green Liberati Singh

Chirkun Greig Love Sneller

Clemente Greimel McCready Sowerby

Cochran Guerra Moss Wittenberg

Dianda Hammoud Neeley Yancey

Durhal Hertel Pagan Yanez

Elder Hoadley Peterson Yaroch

Ellison Howell Rabhi Zemke

Faris Howrylak

In The Chair: Glenn

The House agreed to the title of the bill.

Rep. Lauwers moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

______

Rep. Howrylak, having reserved the right to explain his protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

House Bills 5955-5965 represent a solution in search of a problem. The proposed legislative action is blunt and not specific. If anything, it should be pruned and refined, with an intent to protect local control. Decisions made at the local level are those that best reflect the will of the community.”

Rep. Geiss, having reserved the right to explain her protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

Prior to today, 54 bills have been introduced since 2013 that erode local control. This set of 11 bills to prohibit local units of government from imposing licensing requirements on specific occupations if they do not already do so brings the number of local government pre-emption bills to 65. Prohibiting local government from doing its job is not the role of state government. According to Thomas Jefferson, ‘The government closest to the people, serves the people best.’ The government that is closest to the people is local government and pre-emption bills like this prevent locally elected leaders from serving their people best. Lansing has no business creating pre-emptive language for local government and prohibiting the elected leaders of local units of government from enacting its own ordinances, regulations, resolutions and polices. This legislature’s continual infringement upon the power of local elected leaders to make the decisions they believe serve their communities best is disrespectful and short-sighted.”

Rep. Yaroch, having reserved the right to explain his protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

I voted ‘no’ on this bill package in order to protect local government’s ability to regulate occupations which the State of Michigan have not addressed.

House Bill No. 5961, entitled

A bill to amend 1895 PA 215, entitled “The fourth class city act,” by amending section 1 of chapter XI (MCL 91.1), as amended by 1994 PA 19.

Was read a third time and passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

Roll Call No. 467 Yeas—58

Afendoulis Garcia LaFave Rendon

Albert Glenn LaSata Roberts

Alexander Graves Lauwers Runestad

Allor Griffin Leonard Sheppard

Barrett Hauck Leutheuser Tedder

Bellino Hernandez Lilly Theis

Bizon Hoitenga Lower VanderWall

Brann Hornberger Lucido VanSingel

Calley Hughes Marino Vaupel

Canfield Iden Maturen VerHeulen

Chatfield Inman Miller Victory

Cole Johnson Noble Webber

Cox Kahle Pagel Wentworth

Crawford Kelly Reilly Whiteford

Farrington Kesto

Nays—50

Brinks Frederick Jones Robinson

Byrd Garrett Kosowski Sabo

Cambensy Gay-Dagnogo LaGrand Santana

Camilleri Geiss Lasinski Scott

Chang Green Liberati Singh

Chirkun Greig Love Sneller

Clemente Greimel McCready Sowerby

Cochran Guerra Moss Wittenberg

Dianda Hammoud Neeley Yancey

Durhal Hertel Pagan Yanez

Elder Hoadley Peterson Yaroch

Ellison Howell Rabhi Zemke

Faris Howrylak

In The Chair: Glenn

The House agreed to the title of the bill.

Rep. Lauwers moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

______

Rep. Howrylak, having reserved the right to explain his protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

House Bills 5955-5965 represent a solution in search of a problem. The proposed legislative action is blunt and not specific. If anything, it should be pruned and refined, with an intent to protect local control. Decisions made at the local level are those that best reflect the will of the community.”

Rep. Geiss, having reserved the right to explain her protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

Prior to today, 54 bills have been introduced since 2013 that erode local control. This set of 11 bills to prohibit local units of government from imposing licensing requirements on specific occupations if they do not already do so brings the number of local government pre-emption bills to 65. Prohibiting local government from doing its job is not the role of state government. According to Thomas Jefferson, ‘The government closest to the people, serves the people best.’ The government that is closest to the people is local government and pre-emption bills like this prevent locally elected leaders from serving their people best. Lansing has no business creating pre-emptive language for local government and prohibiting the elected leaders of local units of government from enacting its own ordinances, regulations, resolutions and polices. This legislature’s continual infringement upon the power of local elected leaders to make the decisions they believe serve their communities best is disrespectful and short-sighted.”

Rep. Yaroch, having reserved the right to explain his protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

I voted ‘no’ on this bill package in order to protect local government’s ability to regulate occupations which the State of Michigan have not addressed.”

House Bill No. 5962, entitled

A bill to amend 1851 PA 156, entitled “An act to define the powers and duties of the county boards of commissioners of the several counties, and to confer upon them certain local, administrative and legislative powers; and to prescribe penalties for the violation of the provisions of this act,” (MCL 46.1 to 46.32) by adding section 11e.

Was read a third time and passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

Roll Call No. 468 Yeas—58

Afendoulis Garcia LaFave Rendon

Albert Glenn LaSata Roberts

Alexander Graves Lauwers Runestad

Allor Griffin Leonard Sheppard

Barrett Hauck Leutheuser Tedder

Bellino Hernandez Lilly Theis

Bizon Hoitenga Lower VanderWall

Brann Hornberger Lucido VanSingel

Calley Hughes Marino Vaupel

Canfield Iden Maturen VerHeulen

Chatfield Inman Miller Victory

Cole Johnson Noble Webber

Cox Kahle Pagel Wentworth

Crawford Kelly Reilly Whiteford

Farrington Kesto

Nays—50

Brinks Frederick Jones Robinson

Byrd Garrett Kosowski Sabo

Cambensy Gay-Dagnogo LaGrand Santana

Camilleri Geiss Lasinski Scott

Chang Green Liberati Singh

Chirkun Greig Love Sneller

Clemente Greimel McCready Sowerby

Cochran Guerra Moss Wittenberg

Dianda Hammoud Neeley Yancey

Durhal Hertel Pagan Yanez

Elder Hoadley Peterson Yaroch

Ellison Howell Rabhi Zemke

Faris Howrylak

In The Chair: Glenn

The House agreed to the title of the bill.

Rep. Lauwers moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

______

Rep. Howrylak, having reserved the right to explain his protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

House Bills 5955-5965 represent a solution in search of a problem. The proposed legislative action is blunt and not specific. If anything, it should be pruned and refined, with an intent to protect local control. Decisions made at the local level are those that best reflect the will of the community.”

Rep. Geiss, having reserved the right to explain her protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

Prior to today, 54 bills have been introduced since 2013 that erode local control. This set of 11 bills to prohibit local units of government from imposing licensing requirements on specific occupations if they do not already do so brings the number of local government pre-emption bills to 65. Prohibiting local government from doing its job is not the role of state government. According to Thomas Jefferson, ‘The government closest to the people, serves the people best.’ The government that is closest to the people is local government and pre-emption bills like this prevent locally elected leaders from serving their people best. Lansing has no business creating pre-emptive language for local government and prohibiting the elected leaders of local units of government from enacting its own ordinances, regulations, resolutions and polices. This legislature’s continual infringement upon the power of local elected leaders to make the decisions they believe serve their communities best is disrespectful and short-sighted.”

Rep. Yaroch, having reserved the right to explain his protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

I voted ‘no’ on this bill package in order to protect local government’s ability to regulate occupations which the State of Michigan have not addressed.”

Rep. Phelps entered the House Chambers.

House Bill No. 5963, entitled

A bill to amend 1895 PA 3, entitled “The general law village act,” by amending section 2 of chapter VII (MCL 67.2), as amended by 1994 PA 16.

Was read a third time and passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

Roll Call No. 469 Yeas—58

Afendoulis Garcia LaFave Rendon

Albert Glenn LaSata Roberts

Alexander Graves Lauwers Runestad

Allor Griffin Leonard Sheppard

Barrett Hauck Leutheuser Tedder

Bellino Hernandez Lilly Theis

Bizon Hoitenga Lower VanderWall

Brann Hornberger Lucido VanSingel

Calley Hughes Marino Vaupel

Canfield Iden Maturen VerHeulen

Chatfield Inman Miller Victory

Cole Johnson Noble Webber

Cox Kahle Pagel Wentworth

Crawford Kelly Reilly Whiteford

Farrington Kesto

Nays—51

Brinks Frederick Jones Robinson

Byrd Garrett Kosowski Sabo

Cambensy Gay-Dagnogo LaGrand Santana

Camilleri Geiss Lasinski Scott

Chang Green Liberati Singh

Chirkun Greig Love Sneller

Clemente Greimel McCready Sowerby

Cochran Guerra Moss Wittenberg

Dianda Hammoud Neeley Yancey

Durhal Hertel Pagan Yanez

Elder Hoadley Peterson Yaroch

Ellison Howell Phelps Zemke

Faris Howrylak Rabhi

In The Chair: Glenn

The House agreed to the title of the bill.

Rep. Lauwers moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

______

Rep. Howrylak, having reserved the right to explain his protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

House Bills 5955-5965 represent a solution in search of a problem. The proposed legislative action is blunt and not specific. If anything, it should be pruned and refined, with an intent to protect local control. Decisions made at the local level are those that best reflect the will of the community.”

Rep. Geiss, having reserved the right to explain her protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

Prior to today, 54 bills have been introduced since 2013 that erode local control. This set of 11 bills to prohibit local units of government from imposing licensing requirements on specific occupations if they do not already do so brings the number of local government pre-emption bills to 65. Prohibiting local government from doing its job is not the role of state government. According to Thomas Jefferson, ‘The government closest to the people, serves the people best.’ The government that is closest to the people is local government and pre-emption bills like this prevent locally elected leaders from serving their people best. Lansing has no business creating pre-emptive language for local government and prohibiting the elected leaders of local units of government from enacting its own ordinances, regulations, resolutions and polices. This legislature’s continual infringement upon the power of local elected leaders to make the decisions they believe serve their communities best is disrespectful and short-sighted.”

Rep. Yaroch, having reserved the right to explain his protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

I voted ‘no’ on this bill package in order to protect local government’s ability to regulate occupations which the State of Michigan have not addressed.”

House Bill No. 5964, entitled

A bill to amend 1973 PA 139, entitled “An act to provide forms of county government; to provide for county managers and county executives and to prescribe their powers and duties; to abolish certain departments, boards, commissions, and authorities; to provide for transfer of certain powers and functions; to prescribe powers of a board of county commissioners and elected officials; to provide organization of administrative functions; to transfer property; to retain ordinances and laws not inconsistent with this act; to provide methods for abolition of a unified form of county government; and to prescribe penalties and provide remedies,” (MCL 45.551 to 45.573) by adding section 6c.

Was read a third time and passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

Roll Call No. 470 Yeas—58

Afendoulis Garcia LaFave Rendon

Albert Glenn LaSata Roberts

Alexander Graves Lauwers Runestad

Allor Griffin Leonard Sheppard

Barrett Hauck Leutheuser Tedder

Bellino Hernandez Lilly Theis

Bizon Hoitenga Lower VanderWall

Brann Hornberger Lucido VanSingel

Calley Hughes Marino Vaupel

Canfield Iden Maturen VerHeulen

Chatfield Inman Miller Victory

Cole Johnson Noble Webber

Cox Kahle Pagel Wentworth

Crawford Kelly Reilly Whiteford

Farrington Kesto

Nays—51

Brinks Frederick Jones Robinson

Byrd Garrett Kosowski Sabo

Cambensy Gay-Dagnogo LaGrand Santana

Camilleri Geiss Lasinski Scott

Chang Green Liberati Singh

Chirkun Greig Love Sneller

Clemente Greimel McCready Sowerby

Cochran Guerra Moss Wittenberg

Dianda Hammoud Neeley Yancey

Durhal Hertel Pagan Yanez

Elder Hoadley Peterson Yaroch

Ellison Howell Phelps Zemke

Faris Howrylak Rabhi

In The Chair: Glenn

The House agreed to the title of the bill.

Rep. Lauwers moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

______

Rep. Howrylak, having reserved the right to explain his protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

House Bills 5955-5965 represent a solution in search of a problem. The proposed legislative action is blunt and not specific. If anything, it should be pruned and refined, with an intent to protect local control. Decisions made at the local level are those that best reflect the will of the community.”

Rep. Geiss, having reserved the right to explain her protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

Prior to today, 54 bills have been introduced since 2013 that erode local control. This set of 11 bills to prohibit local units of government from imposing licensing requirements on specific occupations if they do not already do so brings the number of local government pre-emption bills to 65. Prohibiting local government from doing its job is not the role of state government. According to Thomas Jefferson, ‘The government closest to the people, serves the people best.’ The government that is closest to the people is local government and pre-emption bills like this prevent locally elected leaders from serving their people best. Lansing has no business creating pre-emptive language for local government and prohibiting the elected leaders of local units of government from enacting its own ordinances, regulations, resolutions and polices. This legislature’s continual infringement upon the power of local elected leaders to make the decisions they believe serve their communities best is disrespectful and short-sighted.”

Rep. Yaroch, having reserved the right to explain his protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

I voted ‘no’ on this bill package in order to protect local government’s ability to regulate occupations which the State of Michigan have not addressed.”

House Bill No. 5965, entitled

A bill to amend 1966 PA 293, entitled “An act to provide for the establishment of charter counties; to provide for the election of charter commissioners; to prescribe their powers and duties; to prohibit certain acts of a county board of commissioners after the approval of the election of a charter commission; to prescribe the mandatory and permissive provisions of a charter; to provide for the exercise by a charter county of certain powers whether or not authorized by its charter; and to prescribe penalties and provide remedies,” (MCL 45.501 to 45.521) by adding section 15d.

Was read a third time and passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

Roll Call No. 471 Yeas—58

Afendoulis Garcia LaFave Rendon

Albert Glenn LaSata Roberts

Alexander Graves Lauwers Runestad

Allor Griffin Leonard Sheppard

Barrett Hauck Leutheuser Tedder

Bellino Hernandez Lilly Theis

Bizon Hoitenga Lower VanderWall

Brann Hornberger Lucido VanSingel

Calley Hughes Marino Vaupel

Canfield Iden Maturen VerHeulen

Chatfield Inman Miller Victory

Cole Johnson Noble Webber

Cox Kahle Pagel Wentworth

Crawford Kelly Reilly Whiteford

Farrington Kesto

Nays—51

Brinks Frederick Jones Robinson

Byrd Garrett Kosowski Sabo

Cambensy Gay-Dagnogo LaGrand Santana

Camilleri Geiss Lasinski Scott

Chang Green Liberati Singh

Chirkun Greig Love Sneller

Clemente Greimel McCready Sowerby

Cochran Guerra Moss Wittenberg

Dianda Hammoud Neeley Yancey

Durhal Hertel Pagan Yanez

Elder Hoadley Peterson Yaroch

Ellison Howell Phelps Zemke

Faris Howrylak Rabhi

In The Chair: Glenn

The House agreed to the title of the bill.

Rep. Lauwers moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

______

Rep. Howrylak, having reserved the right to explain his protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

House Bills 5955-5965 represent a solution in search of a problem. The proposed legislative action is blunt and not specific. If anything, it should be pruned and refined, with an intent to protect local control. Decisions made at the local level are those that best reflect the will of the community.”

Rep. Geiss, having reserved the right to explain her protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

Prior to today, 54 bills have been introduced since 2013 that erode local control. This set of 11 bills to prohibit local units of government from imposing licensing requirements on specific occupations if they do not already do so brings the number of local government pre-emption bills to 65. Prohibiting local government from doing its job is not the role of state government. According to Thomas Jefferson, ‘The government closest to the people, serves the people best.’ The government that is closest to the people is local government and pre-emption bills like this prevent locally elected leaders from serving their people best. Lansing has no business creating pre-emptive language for local government and prohibiting the elected leaders of local units of government from enacting its own ordinances, regulations, resolutions and polices. This legislature’s continual infringement upon the power of local elected leaders to make the decisions they believe serve their communities best is disrespectful and short-sighted.”

Rep. Yaroch, having reserved the right to explain his protest against the passage of the bill, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

I voted ‘no’ on this bill package in order to protect local government’s ability to regulate occupations which the State of Michigan have not addressed.”

House Bill No. 5778, entitled

A bill to amend 2000 PA 274, entitled “Large carnivore act,” by amending sections 2, 3, and 22 (MCL 287.1102, 287.1103, and 287.1122), section 2 as amended by 2016 PA 305 and section 22 as amended by 2013 PA 8, and by adding sections 22a, 22b, and 22c.

The bill was read a third time.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

Rep. Albert moved to amend the bill as follows:

1. Amend page 11, line 16, after the first “IN” by striking out the balance of the line through “TREASURY.” on line 17 and inserting “THE AGRICULTURE LICENSING AND INSPECTION FEES FUND CREATED IN SECTION 9 OF THE INSECT PEST AND PLANT DISEASE ACT, 1931 PA 189, MCL 286.209.”.

2. Amend page 11, line 19, by striking out “RESTRICTED ACCOUNT” and inserting “AGRICULTURE LICENSING AND INSPECTION FEES FUND”.

The motion was seconded and the amendments were adopted, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

The question being on the passage of the bill,

The bill was then passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

Roll Call No. 472 Yeas—55

Afendoulis Frederick Kahle Reilly

Albert Garcia Kelly Rendon

Alexander Glenn LaFave Roberts

Allor Graves LaSata Runestad

Barrett Griffin Lauwers Sheppard

Bellino Hauck Leonard Theis

Bizon Hernandez Leutheuser VanderWall

Brann Hoadley Lilly VanSingel

Brinks Hoitenga Lower Vaupel

Calley Hornberger Lucido VerHeulen

Canfield Howell Maturen Victory

Chatfield Hughes Miller Wentworth

Cole Inman Noble Whiteford

Cox Johnson Pagel

Nays—54

Byrd Garrett LaGrand Sabo

Cambensy Gay-Dagnogo Lasinski Santana

Camilleri Geiss Liberati Scott

Chang Green Love Singh

Chirkun Greig Marino Sneller

Clemente Greimel McCready Sowerby

Cochran Guerra Moss Tedder

Crawford Hammoud Neeley Webber

Dianda Hertel Pagan Wittenberg

Durhal Howrylak Peterson Yancey

Elder Iden Phelps Yanez

Ellison Jones Rabhi Yaroch

Faris Kesto Robinson Zemke

Farrington Kosowski

In The Chair: Glenn

The question being on agreeing to the title of the bill,

Rep. Lauwers moved to amend the title to read as follows:

A bill to amend 2000 PA 274, entitled “Large carnivore act,” by amending sections 2, 3, 14, and 22 (MCL 287.1102, 287.1103, 287.1114, and 287.1122), section 2 as amended by 2016 PA 305 and section 22 as amended by 2013 PA 8, and by adding sections 22a, 22b, and 22c.

The motion prevailed.

The House agreed to the title as amended.

Rep. Lauwers moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

Senate Bill No. 916, entitled

A bill to amend 1917 PA 350, entitled “An act to regulate and license second hand dealers and junk dealers; and to prescribe penalties for the violation of the provisions of this act,” by amending sections 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 (MCL 445.401, 445.402, 445.403, 445.404, and 445.405), sections 1 and 2 as amended by 2008 PA 432, section 3 as amended by 2006 PA 675, and sections 4 and 5 as amended by 2008 PA 428.

Was read a third time and passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

Roll Call No. 473 Yeas—98

Afendoulis Farrington Kesto Rabhi

Albert Frederick Kosowski Rendon

Alexander Garcia LaFave Roberts

Allor Garrett LaGrand Sabo

Bellino Gay-Dagnogo LaSata Santana

Bizon Geiss Lasinski Scott

Brann Glenn Lauwers Sheppard

Brinks Graves Leutheuser Singh

Byrd Green Liberati Sneller

Calley Greig Lilly Sowerby

Cambensy Greimel Love Tedder

Camilleri Griffin Lower VanderWall

Canfield Guerra Lucido VanSingel

Chang Hammoud Marino Vaupel

Chatfield Hauck Maturen VerHeulen

Clemente Hertel McCready Victory

Cochran Hoadley Miller Webber

Cole Howell Moss Wentworth

Cox Howrylak Neeley Whiteford

Crawford Hughes Noble Wittenberg

Dianda Iden Pagan Yancey

Durhal Inman Pagel Yanez

Elder Jones Peterson Yaroch

Ellison Kahle Phelps Zemke

Faris Kelly

Nays—11

Barrett Hoitenga Leonard Runestad

Chirkun Hornberger Reilly Theis

Hernandez Johnson Robinson

In The Chair: Glenn

The House agreed to the title of the bill.

Rep. Lauwers moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

House Bill No. 6050, entitled

A bill to amend 2000 PA 274, entitled “Large carnivore act,” by amending section 22 (MCL 287.1122), as amended by 2013 PA 8.

Was read a third time and passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

Roll Call No. 474 Yeas—63

Afendoulis Faris Kahle Reilly

Albert Farrington Kelly Rendon

Alexander Frederick LaFave Roberts

Allor Geiss LaSata Runestad

Barrett Glenn Lauwers Sheppard

Bellino Graves Leonard Sneller

Bizon Griffin Leutheuser Theis

Brann Hauck Lilly VanderWall

Calley Hernandez Lower VanSingel

Cambensy Hoitenga Lucido Vaupel

Canfield Hornberger Marino VerHeulen

Chatfield Howell Maturen Victory

Cole Hughes Miller Wentworth

Cox Iden Noble Whiteford

Dianda Inman Pagel Yaroch

Elder Johnson Phelps

Nays—46

Brinks Gay-Dagnogo LaGrand Sabo

Byrd Green Lasinski Santana

Camilleri Greig Liberati Scott

Chang Greimel Love Singh

Chirkun Guerra McCready Sowerby

Clemente Hammoud Moss Tedder

Cochran Hertel Neeley Webber

Crawford Hoadley Pagan Wittenberg

Durhal Howrylak Peterson Yancey

Ellison Jones Rabhi Yanez

Garcia Kesto Robinson Zemke

Garrett Kosowski

In The Chair: Glenn

The House agreed to the title of the bill.

Rep. Lauwers moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

Senate Bill No. 622, entitled

A bill to amend 2001 PA 142, entitled “Michigan memorial highway act,” (MCL 250.1001 to 250.2080) by adding section 12a.

Was read a third time and passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

Roll Call No. 475 Yeas—109

Afendoulis Frederick Kelly Reilly

Albert Garcia Kesto Rendon

Alexander Garrett Kosowski Roberts

Allor Gay-Dagnogo LaFave Robinson

Barrett Geiss LaGrand Runestad

Bellino Glenn LaSata Sabo

Bizon Graves Lasinski Santana

Brann Green Lauwers Scott

Brinks Greig Leonard Sheppard

Byrd Greimel Leutheuser Singh

Calley Griffin Liberati Sneller

Cambensy Guerra Lilly Sowerby

Camilleri Hammoud Love Tedder

Canfield Hauck Lower Theis

Chang Hernandez Lucido VanderWall

Chatfield Hertel Marino VanSingel

Chirkun Hoadley Maturen Vaupel

Clemente Hoitenga McCready VerHeulen

Cochran Hornberger Miller Victory

Cole Howell Moss Webber

Cox Howrylak Neeley Wentworth

Crawford Hughes Noble Whiteford

Dianda Iden Pagan Wittenberg

Durhal Inman Pagel Yancey

Elder Johnson Peterson Yanez

Ellison Jones Phelps Yaroch

Faris Kahle Rabhi Zemke

Farrington

Nays—0

In The Chair: Glenn

The question being on agreeing to the title of the bill,

Rep. Lauwers moved to amend the title to read as follows:

A bill to amend 2001 PA 142, entitled “An act to consolidate prior acts naming certain Michigan highways; to provide for the naming of certain highways; to prescribe certain duties of the state transportation department; and to repeal acts and parts of acts and certain resolutions,” (MCL 250.1001 to 250.2080) by adding section 12b.

The motion prevailed.

The House agreed to the title as amended.

Rep. Lauwers moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

Senate Bill No. 459, entitled

A bill to amend 2001 PA 142, entitled “Michigan memorial highway act,” (MCL 250.1001 to 250.2080) by adding section 20a.

Was read a third time and passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

Roll Call No. 476 Yeas—109

Afendoulis Frederick Kelly Reilly

Albert Garcia Kesto Rendon

Alexander Garrett Kosowski Roberts

Allor Gay-Dagnogo LaFave Robinson

Barrett Geiss LaGrand Runestad

Bellino Glenn LaSata Sabo

Bizon Graves Lasinski Santana

Brann Green Lauwers Scott

Brinks Greig Leonard Sheppard

Byrd Greimel Leutheuser Singh

Calley Griffin Liberati Sneller

Cambensy Guerra Lilly Sowerby

Camilleri Hammoud Love Tedder

Canfield Hauck Lower Theis

Chang Hernandez Lucido VanderWall

Chatfield Hertel Marino VanSingel

Chirkun Hoadley Maturen Vaupel

Clemente Hoitenga McCready VerHeulen

Cochran Hornberger Miller Victory

Cole Howell Moss Webber

Cox Howrylak Neeley Wentworth

Crawford Hughes Noble Whiteford

Dianda Iden Pagan Wittenberg

Durhal Inman Pagel Yancey

Elder Johnson Peterson Yanez

Ellison Jones Phelps Yaroch

Faris Kahle Rabhi Zemke

Farrington

Nays—0

In The Chair: Glenn

Pursuant to Joint Rule 20, the full title of the act shall be inserted to read as follows:

“An act to consolidate prior acts naming certain Michigan highways; to provide for the naming of certain highways; to prescribe certain duties of the state transportation department; and to repeal acts and parts of acts and certain resolutions,”

The House agreed to the full title.

Rep. Lauwers moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

House Bill No. 6025, entitled

A bill to amend 2001 PA 142, entitled “Michigan memorial highway act,” (MCL 250.1001 to 250.2080) by adding section 3b.

Was read a third time and passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

Roll Call No. 477 Yeas—109

Afendoulis Frederick Kelly Reilly

Albert Garcia Kesto Rendon

Alexander Garrett Kosowski Roberts

Allor Gay-Dagnogo LaFave Robinson

Barrett Geiss LaGrand Runestad

Bellino Glenn LaSata Sabo

Bizon Graves Lasinski Santana

Brann Green Lauwers Scott

Brinks Greig Leonard Sheppard

Byrd Greimel Leutheuser Singh

Calley Griffin Liberati Sneller

Cambensy Guerra Lilly Sowerby

Camilleri Hammoud Love Tedder

Canfield Hauck Lower Theis

Chang Hernandez Lucido VanderWall

Chatfield Hertel Marino VanSingel

Chirkun Hoadley Maturen Vaupel

Clemente Hoitenga McCready VerHeulen

Cochran Hornberger Miller Victory

Cole Howell Moss Webber

Cox Howrylak Neeley Wentworth

Crawford Hughes Noble Whiteford

Dianda Iden Pagan Wittenberg

Durhal Inman Pagel Yancey

Elder Johnson Peterson Yanez

Ellison Jones Phelps Yaroch

Faris Kahle Rabhi Zemke

Farrington

Nays—0

In The Chair: Glenn

The House agreed to the title of the bill.

Rep. Lauwers moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

Senate Bill No. 640, entitled

A bill to amend 1982 PA 432, entitled “Motor bus transportation act,” by amending section 4 (MCL 474.104), as amended by 2016 PA 349.

Was read a third time and passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

Roll Call No. 478 Yeas—109

Afendoulis Frederick Kelly Reilly

Albert Garcia Kesto Rendon

Alexander Garrett Kosowski Roberts

Allor Gay-Dagnogo LaFave Robinson

Barrett Geiss LaGrand Runestad

Bellino Glenn LaSata Sabo

Bizon Graves Lasinski Santana

Brann Green Lauwers Scott

Brinks Greig Leonard Sheppard

Byrd Greimel Leutheuser Singh

Calley Griffin Liberati Sneller

Cambensy Guerra Lilly Sowerby

Camilleri Hammoud Love Tedder

Canfield Hauck Lower Theis

Chang Hernandez Lucido VanderWall

Chatfield Hertel Marino VanSingel

Chirkun Hoadley Maturen Vaupel

Clemente Hoitenga McCready VerHeulen

Cochran Hornberger Miller Victory

Cole Howell Moss Webber

Cox Howrylak Neeley Wentworth

Crawford Hughes Noble Whiteford

Dianda Iden Pagan Wittenberg

Durhal Inman Pagel Yancey

Elder Johnson Peterson Yanez

Ellison Jones Phelps Yaroch

Faris Kahle Rabhi Zemke

Farrington

Nays—0

In The Chair: Glenn

Pursuant to Joint Rule 20, the full title of the act shall be inserted to read as follows:

“An act to regulate persons who transport passengers by motor bus; to prescribe powers and duties for the state transportation department; to impose certain fees; to impose penalties; and to repeal acts and parts of acts,”

The House agreed to the full title.

Rep. Lauwers moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

Senate Bill No. 672, entitled

A bill to amend 1963 PA 181, entitled “Motor carrier safety act of 1963,” by amending section 5 (MCL 480.15), as amended by 2017 PA 116.

Was read a third time and passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

Roll Call No. 479 Yeas—109

Afendoulis Frederick Kelly Reilly

Albert Garcia Kesto Rendon

Alexander Garrett Kosowski Roberts

Allor Gay-Dagnogo LaFave Robinson

Barrett Geiss LaGrand Runestad

Bellino Glenn LaSata Sabo

Bizon Graves Lasinski Santana

Brann Green Lauwers Scott

Brinks Greig Leonard Sheppard

Byrd Greimel Leutheuser Singh

Calley Griffin Liberati Sneller

Cambensy Guerra Lilly Sowerby

Camilleri Hammoud Love Tedder

Canfield Hauck Lower Theis

Chang Hernandez Lucido VanderWall

Chatfield Hertel Marino VanSingel

Chirkun Hoadley Maturen Vaupel

Clemente Hoitenga McCready VerHeulen

Cochran Hornberger Miller Victory

Cole Howell Moss Webber

Cox Howrylak Neeley Wentworth

Crawford Hughes Noble Whiteford

Dianda Iden Pagan Wittenberg

Durhal Inman Pagel Yancey

Elder Johnson Peterson Yanez

Ellison Jones Phelps Yaroch

Faris Kahle Rabhi Zemke

Farrington

Nays—0

In The Chair: Glenn

Pursuant to Joint Rule 20, the full title of the act shall be inserted to read as follows:

“An act to promote safety upon highways open to the public by regulating the operation of certain vehicles; to provide consistent regulation of these areas by state agencies and local units of government; to establish the qualifications of persons necessary for the safe operation of such vehicles; to establish certain violations of shippers offering certain materials for transportation; to limit the hours of service of persons engaged in operating such vehicles; to require the keeping of records of such operations; to provide penalties for the violation of this act; to prescribe the powers and duties of certain state agencies; and to repeal acts and parts of acts,”

The House agreed to the full title.

Rep. Lauwers moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

Senate Bill No. 196, entitled

A bill to amend 2008 PA 525, entitled “Fostering futures scholarship trust fund act,” by amending section 9 (MCL 722.1029), as amended by 2014 PA 530.

Was read a third time and passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

Roll Call No. 480 Yeas—104

Afendoulis Farrington Kelly Rabhi

Albert Frederick Kesto Rendon

Alexander Garcia Kosowski Roberts

Allor Garrett LaFave Robinson

Barrett Gay-Dagnogo LaGrand Runestad

Bellino Geiss LaSata Sabo

Brann Glenn Lasinski Santana

Brinks Graves Lauwers Scott

Byrd Green Leonard Sheppard

Calley Greig Leutheuser Singh

Cambensy Greimel Liberati Sneller

Camilleri Griffin Lilly Sowerby

Canfield Guerra Love Tedder

Chang Hammoud Lower Theis

Chatfield Hauck Lucido VanderWall

Chirkun Hernandez Marino Vaupel

Clemente Hertel Maturen VerHeulen

Cochran Hoadley McCready Victory

Cole Hoitenga Miller Webber

Cox Howell Moss Wentworth

Crawford Howrylak Neeley Whiteford

Dianda Hughes Noble Wittenberg

Durhal Iden Pagan Yancey

Elder Inman Pagel Yanez

Ellison Jones Peterson Yaroch

Faris Kahle Phelps Zemke

Nays—5

Bizon Johnson Reilly VanSingel

Hornberger

In The Chair: Glenn

Pursuant to Joint Rule 20, the full title of the act shall be inserted to read as follows:

“An act to establish the fostering futures scholarship trust fund in the department of treasury; to provide for the distribution of the money from the fund; to prescribe the powers and duties of certain agencies and officials; and to provide for appropriations,”

The House agreed to the full title.

Rep. Lauwers moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

By unanimous consent the House returned to the order of

Reports of Standing Committees

The Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, by Rep. Cole, Chair, reported

Senate Bill No. 836, entitled

A bill to amend 1949 PA 300, entitled “Michigan vehicle code,” by amending section 722 (MCL 257.722), as amended by 2017 PA 80.

Without amendment and with the recommendation that the bill pass.

The bill was referred to the order of Second Reading of Bills.

Favorable Roll Call

To Report Out:

Yeas: Reps. Cole, Webber, Lucido, Roberts, Howell, Alexander, Calley, Noble and Sabo

Nays: Rep. Love

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

The following report, submitted by Rep. Cole, Chair, of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, was received and read:

Meeting held on: Tuesday, June 12, 2018

Present: Reps. Cole, Webber, Lucido, Roberts, Howell, Alexander, Calley, Noble, Chirkun, Love, Clemente, Sabo and Yancey

Absent: Rep. Maturen

Excused: Rep. Maturen

The Committee on Health Policy, by Rep. Vaupel, Chair, reported

House Bill No. 5647, entitled

A bill to amend 1978 PA 368, entitled “Public health code,” by amending section 13521 (MCL 333.13521), as amended by 1989 PA 56, and by adding section 13527.

With the recommendation that the substitute (H-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.

The bill and substitute were referred to the order of Second Reading of Bills.

Favorable Roll Call

To Report Out:

Yeas: Reps. Vaupel, Tedder, Graves, Garcia, Sheppard, Calley, Farrington, Hauck, Hornberger, Kahle, Noble, Brinks, Neeley, Ellison and Hammoud

Nays: None

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

The following report, submitted by Rep. Vaupel, Chair, of the Committee on Health Policy, was received and read:

Meeting held on: Tuesday, June 12, 2018

Present: Reps. Vaupel, Tedder, Graves, Garcia, Sheppard, Calley, Farrington, Hauck, Hornberger, Kahle, Noble, Brinks, Neeley, Ellison and Hammoud

Absent: Reps. Garrett and Hertel

Excused: Reps. Garrett and Hertel

The Committee on Workforce and Talent Development, by Rep. Frederick, Chair, reported

Senate Bill No. 175, entitled

A bill to amend 1976 PA 451, entitled “The revised school code,” by amending section 1278a (MCL 380.1278a), as amended by 2015 PA 186.

Without amendment and with the recommendation that the bill pass.

The bill was referred to the order of Second Reading of Bills.

Favorable Roll Call

To Report Out:

Yeas: Reps. Frederick, Kahle, Crawford, Iden, Leutheuser, Wentworth, Love, Geiss and Sabo

Nays: None

The Committee on Workforce and Talent Development, by Rep. Frederick, Chair, reported

Senate Bill No. 343, entitled

A bill to amend 1976 PA 451, entitled “The revised school code,” by amending section 1278c (MCL 380.1278c), as added by 2014 PA 288.

Without amendment and with the recommendation that the bill pass.

The bill was referred to the order of Second Reading of Bills.

Favorable Roll Call

To Report Out:

Yeas: Reps. Frederick, Kahle, Crawford, Iden, Leutheuser, Wentworth, Love, Geiss and Sabo

Nays: None

The Committee on Workforce and Talent Development, by Rep. Frederick, Chair, reported

Senate Bill No. 684, entitled

A bill to amend 1976 PA 451, entitled “The revised school code,” by amending section 1278b (MCL 380.1278b), as amended by 2014 PA 209.

Without amendment and with the recommendation that the bill pass.

The bill was referred to the order of Second Reading of Bills.

Favorable Roll Call

To Report Out:

Yeas: Reps. Frederick, Kahle, Crawford, Iden, Leutheuser, Wentworth and Sabo

Nays: Reps. Love and Geiss

The Committee on Workforce and Talent Development, by Rep. Frederick, Chair, reported

Senate Bill No. 685, entitled

A bill to amend 1976 PA 451, entitled “The revised school code,” by amending section 1277 (MCL 380.1277), as amended by 2016 PA 532.

Without amendment and with the recommendation that the bill pass.

The bill was referred to the order of Second Reading of Bills.

Favorable Roll Call

To Report Out:

Yeas: Reps. Frederick, Kahle, Crawford, Iden, Leutheuser, Wentworth and Sabo

Nays: Reps. Love and Geiss

COMMITTEE ATTENDANCE REPORT

The following report, submitted by Rep. Frederick, Chair, of the Committee on Workforce and Talent Development, was received and read:

Meeting held on: Tuesday, June 12, 2018

Present: Reps. Frederick, Kahle, Crawford, Iden, Leutheuser, Wentworth, Love, Geiss and Sabo

Second Reading of Bills

Senate Bill No. 684, entitled

A bill to amend 1976 PA 451, entitled “The revised school code,” by amending section 1278b (MCL 380.1278b), as amended by 2014 PA 209.

The bill was read a second time.

Rep. Cole moved that the bill be placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

The motion prevailed.

Senate Bill No. 685, entitled

A bill to amend 1976 PA 451, entitled “The revised school code,” by amending section 1277 (MCL 380.1277), as amended by 2016 PA 532.

The bill was read a second time.

Rep. Cole moved that the bill be placed on the order of Third Reading of Bills.

The motion prevailed.

By unanimous consent the House returned to the order of

Third Reading of Bills

Rep. Cole moved that Senate Bill No. 684 be placed on its immediate passage.

The motion prevailed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

Senate Bill No. 684, entitled

A bill to amend 1976 PA 451, entitled “The revised school code,” by amending section 1278b (MCL 380.1278b), as amended by 2014 PA 209.

Was read a third time and passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

Roll Call No. 481 Yeas—89

Afendoulis Ellison Kahle Phelps

Albert Faris Kelly Rendon

Alexander Farrington Kesto Roberts

Allor Frederick Kosowski Sabo

Barrett Garcia LaFave Scott

Bellino Glenn LaGrand Sheppard

Bizon Graves LaSata Sneller

Brann Green Lasinski Sowerby

Brinks Greig Lauwers Tedder

Calley Greimel Leonard VanderWall

Cambensy Griffin Leutheuser VanSingel

Camilleri Guerra Liberati Vaupel

Canfield Hammoud Lilly VerHeulen

Chang Hauck Lower Victory

Chatfield Hernandez Lucido Webber

Chirkun Hertel Marino Wentworth

Clemente Hoadley Maturen Whiteford

Cole Hoitenga McCready Wittenberg

Cox Howell Miller Yancey

Crawford Hughes Moss Yanez

Dianda Iden Neeley Yaroch

Durhal Inman Pagel Zemke

Elder

Nays—20

Byrd Hornberger Noble Robinson

Cochran Howrylak Pagan Runestad

Garrett Johnson Peterson Santana

Gay-Dagnogo Jones Rabhi Singh

Geiss Love Reilly Theis

In The Chair: Glenn

Pursuant to Joint Rule 20, the full title of the act shall be inserted to read as follows:

“An act to provide a system of public instruction and elementary and secondary schools; to revise, consolidate, and clarify the laws relating to elementary and secondary education; to provide for the organization, regulation, and maintenance of schools, school districts, public school academies, intermediate school districts, and other public school entities; to prescribe rights, powers, duties, and privileges of schools, school districts, public school academies, intermediate school districts, and other public school entities; to provide for the regulation of school teachers and certain other school employees; to provide for school elections and to prescribe powers and duties with respect thereto; to provide for the levy and collection of taxes; to provide for the borrowing of money and issuance of bonds and other evidences of indebtedness; to establish a fund and provide for expenditures from that fund; to make appropriations for certain purposes; to provide for and prescribe the powers and duties of certain state departments, the state board of education, and certain other boards and officials; to provide for licensure of boarding schools; to prescribe penalties; and to repeal acts and parts of acts,”

The House agreed to the full title.

Rep. Lauwers moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

Rep. Lauwers moved that Senate Bill No. 685 be placed on its immediate passage.

The motion prevailed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor.

Senate Bill No. 685, entitled

A bill to amend 1976 PA 451, entitled “The revised school code,” by amending section 1277 (MCL 380.1277), as amended by 2016 PA 532.

Was read a third time and passed, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

Roll Call No. 482 Yeas—86

Afendoulis Elder Kelly Phelps

Albert Ellison Kesto Rendon

Alexander Faris Kosowski Roberts

Allor Farrington LaFave Sabo

Barrett Frederick LaGrand Scott

Bellino Garcia LaSata Sheppard

Bizon Glenn Lasinski Sneller

Brann Graves Lauwers Sowerby

Brinks Greig Leonard Tedder

Calley Greimel Leutheuser VanderWall

Cambensy Griffin Liberati VanSingel

Camilleri Guerra Lilly Vaupel

Canfield Hammoud Lower VerHeulen

Chang Hauck Lucido Victory

Chatfield Hernandez Marino Webber

Chirkun Hertel Maturen Wentworth

Clemente Hoadley McCready Whiteford

Cole Howell Miller Wittenberg

Cox Hughes Moss Yancey

Crawford Iden Neeley Yaroch

Dianda Inman Pagel Zemke

Durhal Kahle

Nays—23

Byrd Hoitenga Noble Runestad

Cochran Hornberger Pagan Santana

Garrett Howrylak Peterson Singh

Gay-Dagnogo Johnson Rabhi Theis

Geiss Jones Reilly Yanez

Green Love Robinson

In The Chair: Glenn

Pursuant to Joint Rule 20, the full title of the act shall be inserted to read as follows:

“An act to provide a system of public instruction and elementary and secondary schools; to revise, consolidate, and clarify the laws relating to elementary and secondary education; to provide for the organization, regulation, and maintenance of schools, school districts, public school academies, intermediate school districts, and other public school entities; to prescribe rights, powers, duties, and privileges of schools, school districts, public school academies, intermediate school districts, and other public school entities; to provide for the regulation of school teachers and certain other school employees; to provide for school elections and to prescribe powers and duties with respect thereto; to provide for the levy and collection of taxes; to provide for the borrowing of money and issuance of bonds and other evidences of indebtedness; to establish a fund and provide for expenditures from that fund; to make appropriations for certain purposes; to provide for and prescribe the powers and duties of certain state departments, the state board of education, and certain other boards and officials; to provide for licensure of boarding schools; to prescribe penalties; and to repeal acts and parts of acts,”

The House agreed to the full title.

Rep. Lauwers moved that the bill be given immediate effect.

The motion prevailed, 2/3 of the members serving voting therefor.

By unanimous consent the House returned to the order of

Reports of Select Committees

First Conference Report

The Committee of Conference on the matters of difference between the two Houses concerning

House Bill No. 5579, entitled

A bill to amend 1979 PA 94, entitled “The state school aid act of 1979,” by amending sections 6, 11, 11a, 11j, 11k, 11m, 11s, 15, 18, 19, 20, 20d, 20f, 21f, 21h, 21j, 22a, 22b, 22d, 22m, 22n, 24, 24a, 24c, 25e, 25f, 25g, 26a, 26b, 26c, 31a, 31b, 31d, 31f, 31j, 32d, 32p, 32q, 35a, 39, 39a, 41, 51a, 51c, 51d, 53a, 54, 54b, 56, 61a, 61b, 61c, 62, 64b, 64d, 65, 67, 67a, 74, 81, 94, 94a, 95b, 98, 99h, 99k, 99r, 99s, 99t, 99u, 102d, 104, 104c, 104d, 104e, 107, 147, 147a, 147b, 147c, 147e, 152a, 152b, 166b, 201, 201a, 206, 207a, 207b, 207c, 209, 210b, 217, 225, 226, 229, 229a, 230, 236, 236a, 236b, 236c, 241, 251, 252, 256, 263, 264, 265, 265a, 267, 268, 269, 270, 274, 274c, 274d, 276, 277, 278, 279, 280, 281, 282, and 289 (MCL 388.1606, 388.1611, 388.1611a, 388.1611j, 388.1611k, 388.1611m, 388.1611s, 388.1615, 388.1618, 388.1619, 388.1620, 388.1620d, 388.1620f, 388.1621f, 388.1621h, 388.1621j, 388.1622a, 388.1622b, 388.1622d, 388.1622m, 388.1622n, 388.1624, 388.1624a, 388.1624c, 388.1625e, 388.1625f, 388.1625g, 388.1626a, 388.1626b, 388.1626c, 388.1631a, 388.1631b, 388.1631d, 388.1631f, 388.1631j, 388.1632d, 388.1632p, 388.1632q, 388.1635a, 388.1639, 388.1639a, 388.1641, 388.1651a, 388.1651c, 388.1651d, 388.1653a, 388.1654, 388.1654b, 388.1656, 388.1661a, 388.1661b, 388.1661c, 388.1662, 388.1664b, 388.1664d, 388.1665, 388.1667, 388.1667a, 388.1674, 388.1681, 388.1694, 388.1694a, 388.1695b, 388.1698, 388.1699h, 388.1699k, 388.1699r, 388.1699s, 388.1699t, 388.1699u, 388.1702d, 388.1704, 388.1704c, 388.1704d, 388.1704e, 388.1707, 388.1747, 388.1747a, 388.1747b, 388.1747c, 388.1747e, 388.1752a, 388.1752b, 388.1766b, 388.1801, 388.1801a, 388.1806, 388.1807a, 388.1807b, 388.1807c, 388.1809, 388.1810b, 388.1817, 388.1825, 388.1826, 388.1829, 388.1829a, 388.1830, 388.1836, 388.1836a, 388.1836b, 388.1836c, 388.1841, 388.1851, 388.1852, 388.1856, 388.1863, 388.1864, 388.1865, 388.1865a, 388.1867, 388.1868, 388.1869, 388.1870, 388.1874, 388.1874c, 388.1874d, 388.1876, 388.1877, 388.1878, 388.1879, 388.1880, 388.1881, 388.1882, and 388.1889), sections 6, 11a, 11j, 11k, 11m, 11s, 15, 18, 20, 20d, 20f, 22a, 22b, 22d, 24, 24a, 24c, 25f, 25g, 26a, 26b, 26c, 31b, 31d, 31f, 32p, 32q, 39, 39a, 41, 51a, 51c, 51d, 53a, 54, 54b, 56, 61a, 61b, 62, 64b, 65, 67, 74, 81, 94, 94a, 98, 99s, 104, 104d, 147, 147b, 147c, 152a, 152b, 201, 201a, 206, 207a, 207b, 207c, 209, 210b, 217, 225, 226, 229, 229a, 230, 236, 236a, 236b, 236c, 241, 251, 252, 256, 263, 264, 265, 265a, 267, 268, 269, 270, 274, 274c, 276, 277, 278, 279, 280, 281, and 282 as amended and sections 21h, 21j, 22m, 22n, 99k, 147e, and 274d as added by 2017 PA 108, sections 11, 21f, 25e, 31a, 31j, 32d, 35a, 61c, 64d, 67a, 95b, 99h, 99r, 99t, 102d, 104c, 107, 147a, and 166b as amended and sections 99u and 104e as added by 2017 PA 143, section 19 as amended by 2016 PA 533, and section 289 as amended by 2013 PA 60, and by adding sections 17c, 22o, 25h, 35b, 54d, 68, 68a, 68b, 68c, 68d, 110, 167b, 210f, 215, 265b, 265c, 265d, 274e, 274f, and 292; and to repeal acts and parts of acts.

Recommends:

First: That the Senate recede from the Substitute of the Senate as passed by the Senate.

Second: That the House and Senate agree to the Substitute of the House as passed by the House, amended to read as follows:

A bill to amend 1979 PA 94, entitled “The state school aid act of 1979,” by amending sections 6, 11, 11a, 11j, 11k, 11m, 11s, 15, 18, 19, 20, 20d, 20f, 21f, 21h, 22a, 22b, 22d, 22g, 22m, 22n, 24, 24a, 24c, 25e, 25f, 25g, 26a, 26b, 26c, 31a, 31b, 31d, 31f, 31j, 32d, 32p, 32q, 35a, 39, 39a, 41, 51a, 51c, 51d, 53a, 54, 54b, 55, 56, 61a, 61b, 61c, 62, 64b, 64d, 65, 67, 74, 81, 94, 94a, 95b, 98, 99h, 99s, 99t, 99u, 102d, 104, 104b, 104c, 104d, 104e, 107, 147, 147a, 147b, 147c, 147e, 152a, 152b, 163, 164h, 166b, 169a, 201, 201a, 206, 207a, 207b, 207c, 209, 210b, 217, 225, 226, 229, 229a, 230, 236, 236a, 236b, 236c, 241, 245, 251, 252, 256, 263, 264, 265, 265a, 267, 268, 269, 270, 274, 274c, 274d, 275b, 276, 277, 278, 279, 280, 281, 282, and 289 (MCL 388.1606, 388.1611, 388.1611a, 388.1611j, 388.1611k, 388.1611m, 388.1611s, 388.1615, 388.1618, 388.1619, 388.1620, 388.1620d, 388.1620f, 388.1621f, 388.1621h, 388.1622a, 388.1622b, 388.1622d, 388.1622g, 388.1622m, 388.1622n, 388.1624, 388.1624a, 388.1624c, 388.1625e, 388.1625f, 388.1625g, 388.1626a, 388.1626b, 388.1626c, 388.1631a, 388.1631b, 388.1631d, 388.1631f, 388.1631j, 388.1632d, 388.1632p, 388.1632q, 388.1635a, 388.1639, 388.1639a, 388.1641, 388.1651a, 388.1651c, 388.1651d, 388.1653a, 388.1654, 388.1654b, 388.1655, 388.1656, 388.1661a, 388.1661b, 388.1661c, 388.1662, 388.1664b, 388.1664d, 388.1665, 388.1667, 388.1674, 388.1681, 388.1694, 388.1694a, 388.1695b, 388.1698, 388.1699h, 388.1699s, 388.1699t, 388.1699u, 388.1702d, 388.1704, 388.1704b, 388.1704c, 388.1704d, 388.1704e, 388.1707, 388.1747, 388.1747a, 388.1747b, 388.1747c, 388.1747e, 388.1752a, 388.1752b, 388.1763, 388.1764h, 388.1766b, 388.1769a, 388.1801, 388.1801a, 388.1806, 388.1807a, 388.1807b, 388.1807c, 388.1809, 388.1810b, 388.1817, 388.1825, 388.1826, 388.1829, 388.1829a, 388.1830, 388.1836, 388.1836a, 388.1836b, 388.1836c, 388.1841, 388.1845, 388.1851, 388.1852, 388.1856, 388.1863, 388.1864, 388.1865, 388.1865a, 388.1867, 388.1868, 388.1869, 388.1870, 388.1874, 388.1874c, 388.1874d, 388.1875b, 388.1876, 388.1877, 388.1878, 388.1879, 388.1880, 388.1881, 388.1882, and 388.1889), sections 6, 11a, 11j, 11k, 11m, 11s, 15, 18, 20, 20d, 20f, 22a, 22b, 22d, 22g, 24, 24a, 24c, 25f, 25g, 26a, 26b, 26c, 31b, 31d, 31f, 32p, 32q, 39, 39a, 41, 51a, 51c, 51d, 53a, 54, 54b, 55, 56, 61a, 61b, 62, 64b, 65, 67, 74, 81, 94, 94a, 98, 99s, 104, 104d, 147, 147b, 147c, 152a, 152b, 201, 201a, 206, 207a, 207b, 207c, 209, 210b, 217, 225, 226, 229, 229a, 230, 236, 236a, 236b, 236c, 241, 245, 251, 252, 256, 263, 264, 265, 265a, 267, 268, 269, 270, 274, 274c, 276, 277, 278, 279, 280, 281, and 282 as amended and sections 21h, 22m, 22n, 147e, 164h, and 274d as added by 2017 PA 108, sections 11, 21f, 25e, 31a, 31j, 32d, 35a, 61c, 64d, 95b, 99h, 99t, 102d, 104c, 107, 147a, and 166b as amended and sections 99u and 104e as added by 2017 PA 143, section 19 as amended by 2016 PA 533, section 104b as amended by 2016 PA 249, section 163 as amended by 2015 PA 85, section 169a as amended by 1997 PA 93, section 275b as added by 2015 PA 44, and section 289 as amended by 2013 PA 60, and by adding sections 17c, 22p, 25h, 31m, 35b, 54d, 61d, 61e, 99v, 167b, 209a, 210f, 215, 236f, 245a, 265b, 265c, 265d, and 265e; and to repeal acts and parts of acts.

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF MICHIGAN ENACT:

Sec. 6. (1) “Center program” means a program operated by a district or by an intermediate district for special education pupils from several districts in programs for pupils with autism spectrum disorder, pupils with severe cognitive impairment, pupils with moderate cognitive impairment, pupils with severe multiple impairments, pupils with hearing impairment, pupils with visual impairment, and pupils with physical impairment or other health impairment. Programs for pupils with emotional impairment housed in buildings that do not serve regular education pupils also qualify. Unless otherwise approved by the department, a center program either shall serve all constituent districts within an intermediate district or shall serve several districts with less than 50% of the pupils residing in the operating district. In addition, special education center program pupils placed part‑time in noncenter programs to comply with the least restrictive environment provisions of section 612 of part B of the individuals with disabilities education act, 20 USC 1412, may be considered center program pupils for pupil accounting purposes for the time scheduled in either a center program or a noncenter program.

(2) “District and high school graduation rate” means the annual completion and pupil dropout rate that is calculated by the center pursuant to nationally recognized standards.

(3) “District and high school graduation report” means a report of the number of pupils, excluding adult education participants, in the district for the immediately preceding school year, adjusted for those pupils who have transferred into or out of the district or high school, who leave high school with a diploma or other credential of equal status.

(4) “Membership”, except as otherwise provided in this article, means for a district, a public school academy, or an intermediate district the sum of the product of .90 times the number of full‑time equated pupils in grades K to 12 actually enrolled and in regular daily attendance on the pupil membership count day for the current school year, plus the product of .10 times the final audited count from the supplemental count day for the immediately preceding school year. A district’s, public school academy’s, or intermediate district’s membership shall be adjusted as provided under section 25e for pupils who enroll after the pupil membership count day in a strict discipline academy operating under sections 1311b to 1311m of the revised school code, MCL 380.1311b to 380.1311m. However, for a district that is a community district, “membership” means the sum of the product of .90 times the number of full‑time equated pupils in grades K to 12 actually enrolled and in regular daily attendance in the community district on the pupil membership count day for the current school year, plus the product of .10 times the sum of the final audited count from the supplemental count day of pupils in grades K to 12 actually enrolled and in regular daily attendance in the community district for the immediately preceding school year plus the final audited count from the supplemental count day of pupils in grades K to 12 actually enrolled and in regular daily attendance in the education achievement system for the immediately preceding school year. All pupil counts used in this subsection are as determined by the department and calculated by adding the number of pupils registered for attendance plus pupils received by transfer and minus pupils lost as defined by rules promulgated by the superintendent, and as corrected by a subsequent department audit. The amount of the foundation allowance for a pupil in membership is determined under section 20. In making the calculation of membership, all of the following, as applicable, apply to determining the membership of a district, a public school academy, or an intermediate district:

(a) Except as otherwise provided in this subsection, and pursuant to subsection (6), a pupil shall be counted in membership in the pupil’s educating district or districts. An individual pupil shall not be counted for more than a total of 1.0 full‑time equated membership.

(b) If a pupil is educated in a district other than the pupil’s district of residence, if the pupil is not being educated as part of a cooperative education program, if the pupil’s district of residence does not give the educating district its approval to count the pupil in membership in the educating district, and if the pupil is not covered by an exception specified in subsection (6) to the requirement that the educating district must have the approval of the pupil’s district of residence to count the pupil in membership, the pupil shall not be counted in membership in any district.

(c) A special education pupil educated by the intermediate district shall be counted in membership in the intermediate district.

(d) A pupil placed by a court or state agency in an on‑grounds program of a juvenile detention facility, a child caring institution, or a mental health institution, or a pupil funded under section 53a, shall be counted in membership in the district or intermediate district approved by the department to operate the program.

(e) A pupil enrolled in the Michigan Schools for the Deaf and Blind shall be counted in membership in the pupil’s intermediate district of residence.

(f) A pupil enrolled in a career and technical education program supported by a millage levied over an area larger than a single district or in an area vocational‑technical education program established pursuant to section 690 of the revised school code, MCL 380.690, shall be counted only in the pupil’s district of residence.

(g) A pupil enrolled in a public school academy shall be counted in membership in the public school academy.

(h) For the purposes of this section and section 6a, for a cyber school, as defined in section 551 of the revised school code, MCL 380.551, that is in compliance with section 553a of the revised school code, MCL 380.553a, a pupil’s participation in the cyber school’s educational program is considered regular daily attendance, and for a district or public school academy, a pupil’s participation in a virtual course as defined in section 21f is considered regular daily attendance. FOR THE PURPOSES OF THIS SUBDIVISION, FOR A PUPIL ENROLLED IN A CYBER SCHOOL AND UTILIZING SEQUENTIAL LEARNING, PARTICIPATION MEANS THAT TERM AS DEFINED IN THE PUPIL ACCOUNTING MANUAL, SECTION 5‑O‑D: REQUIREMENTS FOR COUNTING PUPILS IN MEMBERSHIP‑SUBSECTION 10.

(i) For a new district or public school academy beginning its operation after December 31, 1994, membership for the first 2 full or partial fiscal years of operation shall be determined as follows:

(i) If operations begin before the pupil membership count day for the fiscal year, membership is the average number of full‑time equated pupils in grades K to 12 actually enrolled and in regular daily attendance on the pupil membership count day for the current school year and on the supplemental count day for the current school year, as determined by the department and calculated by adding the number of pupils registered for attendance on the pupil membership count day plus pupils received by transfer and minus pupils lost as defined by rules promulgated by the superintendent, and as corrected by a subsequent department audit, plus the final audited count from the supplemental count day for the current school year, and dividing that sum by 2.

(ii) If operations begin after the pupil membership count day for the fiscal year and not later than the supplemental count day for the fiscal year, membership is the final audited count of the number of full‑time equated pupils in grades K to 12 actually enrolled and in regular daily attendance on the supplemental count day for the current school year.

(j) If a district is the authorizing body for a public school academy, then, in the first school year in which pupils are counted in membership on the pupil membership count day in the public school academy, the determination of the district’s membership shall exclude from the district’s pupil count for the immediately preceding supplemental count day any pupils who are counted in the public school academy on that first pupil membership count day who were also counted in the district on the immediately preceding supplemental count day.

(k) For an extended school year program approved by the superintendent, a pupil enrolled, but not scheduled to be in regular daily attendance, on a pupil membership count day, shall be counted in membership.

(l) To be counted in membership, a pupil shall meet the minimum age requirement to be eligible to attend school under section 1147 of the revised school code, MCL 380.1147, or shall be enrolled under subsection (3) of that section, and shall be less than 20 years of age on September 1 of the school year except as follows:

(i) A special education pupil who is enrolled and receiving instruction in a special education program or service approved by the department, who does not have a high school diploma, and who is less than 26 years of age as of September 1 of the current school year shall be counted in membership.

(ii) A pupil who is determined by the department to meet all of the following may be counted in membership:

(A) Is enrolled in a public school academy or an alternative education high school diploma program, that is primarily focused on educating pupils with extreme barriers to education, such as being homeless as defined under 42 USC 11302.

(B) Had dropped out of school.

(C) Is less than 22 years of age as of September 1 of the current school year.

(iii) If a child does not meet the minimum age requirement to be eligible to attend school for that school year under section 1147 of the revised school code, MCL 380.1147, but will be 5 years of age not later than December 1 of that school year, the district may count the child in membership for that school year if the parent or legal guardian has notified the district in writing that he or she intends to enroll the child in kindergarten for that school year.

(m) An individual who has achieved a high school diploma shall not be counted in membership. An individual who has achieved a high school equivalency certificate shall not be counted in membership unless the individual is a student with a disability as defined in R 340.1702 of the Michigan Administrative Code. An individual participating in a job training program funded under former section 107a or a jobs program funded under former section 107b, administered by the department of talent and economic development, or participating in any successor of either of those 2 programs, shall not be counted in membership.

(n) If a pupil counted in membership in a public school academy is also educated by a district or intermediate district as part of a cooperative education program, the pupil shall be counted in membership only in the public school academy unless a written agreement signed by all parties designates the party or parties in which the pupil shall be counted in membership, and the instructional time scheduled for the pupil in the district or intermediate district shall be included in the full‑time equated membership determination under subdivision (q) and section 101. However, for pupils receiving instruction in both a public school academy and in a district or intermediate district but not as a part of a cooperative education program, the following apply:

(i) If the public school academy provides instruction for at least 1/2 of the class hours required under section 101, the public school academy shall receive as its prorated share of the full‑time equated membership for each of those pupils an amount equal to 1 times the product of the hours of instruction the public school academy provides divided by the number of hours required under section 101 for full‑time equivalency, and the remainder of the full‑time membership for each of those pupils shall be allocated to the district or intermediate district providing the remainder of the hours of instruction.

(ii) If the public school academy provides instruction for less than 1/2 of the class hours required under section 101, the district or intermediate district providing the remainder of the hours of instruction shall receive as its prorated share of the full‑time equated membership for each of those pupils an amount equal to 1 times the product of the hours of instruction the district or intermediate district provides divided by the number of hours required under section 101 for full‑time equivalency, and the remainder of the full‑time membership for each of those pupils shall be allocated to the public school academy.

(o) An individual less than 16 years of age as of September 1 of the current school year who is being educated in an alternative education program shall not be counted in membership if there are also adult education participants being educated in the same program or classroom.

(p) The department shall give a uniform interpretation of full‑time and part‑time memberships.

(q) The number of class hours used to calculate full‑time equated memberships shall be consistent with section 101. In determining full‑time equated memberships for pupils who are enrolled in a postsecondary institution OR FOR PUPILS ENGAGED IN AN INTERNSHIP OR WORK EXPERIENCE UNDER SECTION 1279H OF THE REVISED SCHOOL CODE, MCL 380.1279H, a pupil shall not be considered to be less than a full‑time equated pupil solely because of the effect of his or her postsecondary enrollment OR ENGAGEMENT IN THE INTERNSHIP OR WORK EXPERIENCE, including necessary travel time, on the number of class hours provided by the district to the pupil.

(r) Full‑time equated memberships for pupils in kindergarten shall be determined by dividing the number of instructional hours scheduled and provided per year per kindergarten pupil by the same number used for determining full‑time equated memberships for pupils in grades 1 to 12. However, to the extent allowable under federal law, for a district or public school academy that provides evidence satisfactory to the department that it used federal title I money in the 2 immediately preceding school fiscal years to fund full‑time kindergarten, full‑time equated memberships for pupils in kindergarten shall be determined by dividing the number of class hours scheduled and provided per year per kindergarten pupil by a number equal to 1/2 the number used for determining full‑time equated memberships for pupils in grades 1 to 12. The change in the counting of full‑time equated memberships for pupils in kindergarten that took effect for 2012‑2013 is not a mandate.

(s) For a district or a public school academy that has pupils enrolled in a grade level that was not offered by the district or public school academy in the immediately preceding school year, the number of pupils enrolled in that grade level to be counted in membership is the average of the number of those pupils enrolled and in regular daily attendance on the pupil membership count day and the supplemental count day of the current school year, as determined by the department. Membership shall be calculated by adding the number of pupils registered for attendance in that grade level on the pupil membership count day plus pupils received by transfer and minus pupils lost as defined by rules promulgated by the superintendent, and as corrected by subsequent department audit, plus the final audited count from the supplemental count day for the current school year, and dividing that sum by 2.

(t) A pupil enrolled in a cooperative education program may be counted in membership in the pupil’s district of residence with the written approval of all parties to the cooperative agreement.

(u) If, as a result of a disciplinary action, a district determines through the district’s alternative or disciplinary education program that the best instructional placement for a pupil is in the pupil’s home or otherwise apart from the general school population, if that placement is authorized in writing by the district superintendent and district alternative or disciplinary education supervisor, and if the district provides appropriate instruction as described in this subdivision to the pupil at the pupil’s home or otherwise apart from the general school population, the district may count the pupil in membership on a pro rata basis, with the proration based on the number of hours of instruction the district actually provides to the pupil divided by the number of hours required under section 101 for full‑time equivalency. For the purposes of this subdivision, a district shall be considered to be providing appropriate instruction if all of the following are met:

(i) The district provides at least 2 nonconsecutive hours of instruction per week to the pupil at the pupil’s home or otherwise apart from the general school population under the supervision of a certificated teacher.

(ii) The district provides instructional materials, resources, and supplies that are comparable to those otherwise provided in the district’s alternative education program.

(iii) Course content is comparable to that in the district’s alternative education program.

(iv) Credit earned is awarded to the pupil and placed on the pupil’s transcript.

(v) If a pupil was enrolled in a public school academy on the pupil membership count day, if the public school academy’s contract with its authorizing body is revoked or the public school academy otherwise ceases to operate, and if the pupil enrolls in a district within 45 days after the pupil membership count day, the department shall adjust the district’s pupil count for the pupil membership count day to include the pupil in the count.

(w) For a public school academy that has been in operation for at least 2 years and that suspended operations for at least 1 semester and is resuming operations, membership is the sum of the product of .90 times the number of full‑time equated pupils in grades K to 12 actually enrolled and in regular daily attendance on the first pupil membership count day or supplemental count day, whichever is first, occurring after operations resume, plus the product of .10 times the final audited count from the most recent pupil membership count day or supplemental count day that occurred before suspending operations, as determined by the superintendent.

(x) If a district’s membership for a particular fiscal year, as otherwise calculated under this subsection, would be less than 1,550 pupils and the district has 4.5 or fewer pupils per square mile, as determined by the department, and if the district does not receive funding under section 22d(2), the district’s membership shall be considered to be the membership figure calculated under this subdivision. If a district educates and counts in its membership pupils in grades 9 to 12 who reside in a contiguous district that does not operate grades 9 to 12 and if 1 or both of the affected districts request the department to use the determination allowed under this sentence, the department shall include the square mileage of both districts in determining the number of pupils per square mile for each of the districts for the purposes of this subdivision. The membership figure calculated under this subdivision is the greater of the following:

(i) The average of the district’s membership for the 3‑fiscal‑year period ending with that fiscal year, calculated by adding the district’s actual membership for each of those 3 fiscal years, as otherwise calculated under this subsection, and dividing the sum of those 3 membership figures by 3.

(ii) The district’s actual membership for that fiscal year as otherwise calculated under this subsection.

(y) Full‑time equated memberships for special education pupils who are not enrolled in kindergarten but are enrolled in a classroom program under R 340.1754 of the Michigan Administrative Code shall be determined by dividing the number of class hours scheduled and provided per year by 450. Full‑time equated memberships for special education pupils who are not enrolled in kindergarten but are receiving early childhood special education services under R 340.1755 or R 340.1862 of the Michigan Administrative Code shall be determined by dividing the number of hours of service scheduled and provided per year per‑pupil by 180.

(z) A pupil of a district that begins its school year after Labor Day who is enrolled in an intermediate district program that begins before Labor Day shall not be considered to be less than a full‑time pupil solely due to instructional time scheduled but not attended by the pupil before Labor Day.

(aa) For the first year in which a pupil is counted in membership on the pupil membership count day in a middle college program, the membership is the average of the full‑time equated membership on the pupil membership count day and on the supplemental count day for the current school year, as determined by the department. If a pupil described in this subdivision was counted in membership by the operating district on the immediately preceding supplemental count day, the pupil shall be excluded from the district’s immediately preceding supplemental count for the purposes of determining the district’s membership.

(bb) A district or public school academy that educates a pupil who attends a United States Olympic Education Center may count the pupil in membership regardless of whether or not the pupil is a resident of this state.

(cc) A pupil enrolled in a district other than the pupil’s district of residence pursuant to section 1148(2) of the revised school code, MCL 380.1148, shall be counted in the educating district.

(dd) For a pupil enrolled in a dropout recovery program that meets the requirements of section 23a, the pupil shall be counted as 1/12 of a full‑time equated membership for each month that the district operating the program reports that the pupil was enrolled in the program and was in full attendance. However, if the special membership counting provisions under this subdivision and the operation of the other membership counting provisions under this subsection result in a pupil being counted as more than 1.0 FTE in a fiscal year, the payment made for the pupil under sections 22a and 22b shall not be based on more than 1.0 FTE for that pupil, and any portion of an FTE for that pupil that exceeds 1.0 shall instead be paid under section 25g. The district operating the program shall report to the center the number of pupils who were enrolled in the program and were in full attendance for a month not later than 30 days after the end of the month. A district shall not report a pupil as being in full attendance for a month unless both of the following are met:

(i) A personalized learning plan is in place on or before the first school day of the month for the first month the pupil participates in the program.

(ii) The pupil meets the district’s definition under section 23a of satisfactory monthly progress for that month or, if the pupil does not meet that definition of satisfactory monthly progress for that month, the pupil did meet that definition of satisfactory monthly progress in the immediately preceding month and appropriate interventions are implemented within 10 school days after it is determined that the pupil does not meet that definition of satisfactory monthly progress.

(ee) A pupil participating in a virtual course under section 21f shall be counted in membership in the district enrolling the pupil.

(ff) If a public school academy that is not in its first or second year of operation closes at the end of a school year and does not reopen for the next school year, the department shall adjust the membership count of the district or other public school academy in which a former pupil of the closed public school academy enrolls and is in regular daily attendance for the next school year to ensure that the district or other public school academy receives the same amount of membership aid for the pupil as if the pupil were counted in the district or other public school academy on the supplemental count day of the preceding school year.

(gg) If a special education pupil is expelled under section 1311 or 1311a of the revised school code, MCL 380.1311 and 380.1311a, and is not in attendance on the pupil membership count day because of the expulsion, and if the pupil remains enrolled in the district and resumes regular daily attendance during that school year, the district’s membership shall be adjusted to count the pupil in membership as if he or she had been in attendance on the pupil membership count day.

(hh) A pupil enrolled in a community district shall be counted in membership in the community district.

(ii) A part‑time pupil enrolled in a nonpublic school in grades K to 12 in accordance with section 166b shall not be counted as more than 0.75 of a full‑time equated membership.

(jj) A district that borders another state or a public school academy that operates at least grades 9 to 12 and is located within 20 miles of a border with another state may count in membership a pupil who is enrolled in a course at a college or university that is located in the bordering state and within 20 miles of the border with this state if all of the following are met:

(i) The pupil would meet the definition of an eligible student under the postsecondary enrollment options act, 1996 PA 160, MCL 388.511 to 388.524, if the course were an eligible course under that act.

(ii) The course in which the pupil is enrolled would meet the definition of an eligible course under the postsecondary enrollment options act, 1996 PA 160, MCL 388.511 to 388.524, if the course were provided by an eligible postsecondary institution under that act.

(iii) The department determines that the college or university is an institution that, in the other state, fulfills a function comparable to a state university or community college, as those terms are defined in section 3 of the postsecondary enrollment options act, 1996 PA 160, MCL 388.513, or is an independent nonprofit degree‑granting college or university.

(iv) The district or public school academy pays for a portion of the pupil’s tuition at the college or university in an amount equal to the eligible charges that the district or public school academy would pay to an eligible postsecondary institution under the postsecondary enrollment options act, 1996 PA 160, MCL 388.511 to 388.524, as if the course were an eligible course under that act.

(v) The district or public school academy awards high school credit to a pupil who successfully completes a course as described in this subdivision.

(kk) A pupil enrolled in a middle college program may be counted for more than a total of 1.0 full‑time equated membership if the pupil is enrolled in more than the minimum number of instructional days and hours required under section 101 and the pupil is expected to complete the 5‑year program with both a high school diploma and at least 60 transferable college credits or is expected to earn an associate’s degree in fewer than 5 years.

(ll) IF A DISTRICT’S OR PUBLIC SCHOOL ACADEMY’S MEMBERSHIP FOR A PARTICULAR FISCAL YEAR, AS OTHERWISE CALCULATED UNDER THIS SUBSECTION, INCLUDES PUPILS COUNTED IN MEMBERSHIP WHO ARE ENROLLED UNDER SECTION 166B, ALL OF THE FOLLOWING APPLY FOR THE PURPOSES OF THIS SUBDIVISION:

(i) IF THE DISTRICT’S OR PUBLIC SCHOOL ACADEMY’S MEMBERSHIP FOR PUPILS COUNTED UNDER SECTION 166B EQUALS OR EXCEEDS 5% OF THE DISTRICT’S OR PUBLIC SCHOOL ACADEMY’S MEMBERSHIP FOR PUPILS NOT COUNTED IN MEMBERSHIP UNDER SECTION 166B IN THE IMMEDIATELY PRECEDING FISCAL YEAR, THEN THE GROWTH IN THE DISTRICT’S OR PUBLIC SCHOOL ACADEMY’S MEMBERSHIP FOR PUPILS COUNTED UNDER SECTION 166B MUST NOT EXCEED 10%.

(ii) IF THE DISTRICT’S OR PUBLIC SCHOOL ACADEMY’S MEMBERSHIP FOR PUPILS COUNTED UNDER SECTION 166B IS LESS THAN 5% OF THE DISTRICT’S OR PUBLIC SCHOOL ACADEMY’S MEMBERSHIP FOR PUPILS NOT COUNTED IN MEMBERSHIP UNDER SECTION 166B IN THE IMMEDIATELY PRECEDING FISCAL YEAR, THEN THE DISTRICT’S OR PUBLIC SCHOOL ACADEMY’S MEMBERSHIP FOR PUPILS COUNTED UNDER SECTION 166B MUST NOT EXCEED THE GREATER OF THE FOLLOWING:

(A) 5% OF THE DISTRICT’S OR PUBLIC SCHOOL ACADEMY’S MEMBERSHIP FOR PUPILS NOT COUNTED IN MEMBERSHIP UNDER SECTION 166B.

(B) 10% MORE THAN THE DISTRICT’S OR PUBLIC SCHOOL ACADEMY’S MEMBERSHIP FOR PUPILS COUNTED UNDER SECTION 166B IN THE IMMEDIATELY PRECEDING FISCAL YEAR.

(iii) IF 1 OR MORE DISTRICTS CONSOLIDATE OR ARE PARTIES TO AN ANNEXATION, THEN THE CALCULATIONS UNDER SUBDIVISIONS (i) AND (ii) MUST BE APPLIED TO THE COMBINED TOTAL MEMBERSHIP FOR PUPILS COUNTED IN THOSE DISTRICTS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR IMMEDIATELY PRECEDING THE CONSOLIDATION OR ANNEXATION.

(MM) IF A DISTRICT, INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT, OR PUBLIC SCHOOL ACADEMY CHARGES TUITION FOR A PUPIL THAT RESIDED OUT OF STATE IN THE IMMEDIATELY PRECEDING SCHOOL YEAR, THE PUPIL SHALL NOT BE COUNTED IN MEMBERSHIP IN THE DISTRICT, INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT, OR PUBLIC SCHOOL ACADEMY.

(5) “Public school academy” means that term as defined in section 5 of the revised school code, MCL 380.5.

(6) “Pupil” means an individual in membership in a public school. A district must have the approval of the pupil’s district of residence to count the pupil in membership, except approval by the pupil’s district of residence is not required for any of the following:

(a) A nonpublic part‑time pupil enrolled in grades K to 12 in accordance with section 166b.

(b) A pupil receiving 1/2 or less of his or her instruction in a district other than the pupil’s district of residence.

(c) A pupil enrolled in a public school academy.

(d) A pupil enrolled in a district other than the pupil’s district of residence under an intermediate district schools of choice pilot program as described in section 91a or former section 91 if the intermediate district and its constituent districts have been exempted from section 105.

(e) A pupil enrolled in a district other than the pupil’s district of residence if the pupil is enrolled in accordance with section 105 or 105c.

(f) A pupil who has made an official written complaint or whose parent or legal guardian has made an official written complaint to law enforcement officials and to school officials of the pupil’s district of residence that the pupil has been the victim of a criminal sexual assault or other serious assault, if the official complaint either indicates that the assault occurred at school or that the assault was committed by 1 or more other pupils enrolled in the school the pupil would otherwise attend in the district of residence or by an employee of the district of residence. A person who intentionally makes a false report of a crime to law enforcement officials for the purposes of this subdivision is subject to section 411a of the Michigan penal code, 1931 PA 328, MCL 750.411a, which provides criminal penalties for that conduct. As used in this subdivision:

(i) “At school” means in a classroom, elsewhere on school premises, on a school bus or other school‑related vehicle, or at a school‑sponsored activity or event whether or not it is held on school premises.

(ii) “Serious assault” means an act that constitutes a felony violation of chapter XI of the Michigan penal code, 1931 PA 328, MCL 750.81 to 750.90h, or that constitutes an assault and infliction of serious or aggravated injury under section 81a of the Michigan penal code, 1931 PA 328, MCL 750.81a.

(g) A pupil whose district of residence changed after the pupil membership count day and before the supplemental count day and who continues to be enrolled on the supplemental count day as a nonresident in the district in which he or she was enrolled as a resident on the pupil membership count day of the same school year.

(h) A pupil enrolled in an alternative education program operated by a district other than his or her district of residence who meets 1 or more of the following:

(i) The pupil has been suspended or expelled from his or her district of residence for any reason, including, but not limited to, a suspension or expulsion under section 1310, 1311, or 1311a of the revised school code, MCL 380.1310, 380.1311, and 380.1311a.

(ii) The pupil had previously dropped out of school.

(iii) The pupil is pregnant or is a parent.

(iv) The pupil has been referred to the program by a court.

(i) A pupil enrolled in the Michigan Virtual School, for the pupil’s enrollment in the Michigan Virtual School.

(j) A pupil who is the child of a person who works at the district or who is the child of a person who worked at the district as of the time the pupil first enrolled in the district but who no longer works at the district due to a workforce reduction. As used in this subdivision, “child” includes an adopted child, stepchild, or legal ward.

(k) An expelled pupil who has been denied reinstatement by the expelling district and is reinstated by another school board under section 1311 or 1311a of the revised school code, MCL 380.1311 and 380.1311a.

(l) A pupil enrolled in a district other than the pupil’s district of residence in a middle college program if the pupil’s district of residence and the enrolling district are both constituent districts of the same intermediate district.

(m) A pupil enrolled in a district other than the pupil’s district of residence who attends a United States Olympic Education Center.

(n) A pupil enrolled in a district other than the pupil’s district of residence pursuant to section 1148(2) of the revised school code, MCL 380.1148.

(o) A pupil who enrolls in a district other than the pupil’s district of residence as a result of the pupil’s school not making adequate yearly progress under the no child left behind act of 2001, Public Law 107‑110, or the every student succeeds act, Public Law 114‑95.

However, except for pupils enrolled in the youth challenge program at the site at which the youth challenge program operated for 2015‑2016, if a district educates pupils who reside in another district and if the primary instructional site for those pupils is established by the educating district after 2009‑2010 and is located within the boundaries of that other district, the educating district must have the approval of that other district to count those pupils in membership.

(7) “Pupil membership count day” of a district or intermediate district means:

(a) Except as provided in subdivision (b), the first Wednesday in October each school year or, for a district or building in which school is not in session on that Wednesday due to conditions not within the control of school authorities, with the approval of the superintendent, the immediately following day on which school is in session in the district or building.

(b) For a district or intermediate district maintaining school during the entire school year, the following days:

(i) Fourth Wednesday in July.

(ii) First Wednesday in October.

(iii) Second Wednesday in February.

(iv) Fourth Wednesday in April.

(8) “Pupils in grades K to 12 actually enrolled and in regular daily attendance” means pupils in grades K to 12 in attendance and receiving instruction in all classes for which they are enrolled on the pupil membership count day or the supplemental count day, as applicable. Except as otherwise provided in this subsection, a pupil who is absent from any of the classes in which the pupil is enrolled on the pupil membership count day or supplemental count day and who does not attend each of those classes during the 10 consecutive school days immediately following the pupil membership count day or supplemental count day, except for a pupil who has been excused by the district, shall not be counted as 1.0 full‑time equated membership. A pupil who is excused from attendance on the pupil membership count day or supplemental count day and who fails to attend each of the classes in which the pupil is enrolled within 30 calendar days after the pupil membership count day or supplemental count day shall not be counted as 1.0 full‑time equated membership. In addition, a pupil who was enrolled and in attendance in a district, intermediate district, or public school academy before the pupil membership count day or supplemental count day of a particular year but was expelled or suspended on the pupil membership count day or supplemental count day shall only be counted as 1.0 full‑time equated membership if the pupil resumed attendance in the district, intermediate district, or public school academy within 45 days after the pupil membership count day or supplemental count day of that particular year. Pupils not counted as 1.0 full‑time equated membership due to an absence from a class shall be counted as a prorated membership for the classes the pupil attended. For purposes of this subsection, “class” means a period of time in 1 day when pupils and a certificated teacher or legally qualified AN INDIVIDUAL WORKING UNDER A VALID substitute teacher PERMIT, AUTHORIZATION, OR APPROVAL ISSUED BY THE DEPARTMENT, are together and instruction is taking place.

(9) “Rule” means a rule promulgated pursuant to the administrative procedures act of 1969, 1969 PA 306, MCL 24.201 to 24.328.

(10) “The revised school code” means 1976 PA 451, MCL 380.1 to 380.1852.

(11) “School district of the first class”, “first class school district”, and “district of the first class” mean, for the purposes of this article only, a district that had at least 40,000 pupils in membership for the immediately preceding fiscal year.

(12) “School fiscal year” means a fiscal year that commences July 1 and continues through June 30.

(13) “State board” means the state board of education.

(14) “Superintendent”, unless the context clearly refers to a district or intermediate district superintendent, means the superintendent of public instruction described in section 3 of article VIII of the state constitution of 1963.

(15) “Supplemental count day” means the day on which the supplemental pupil count is conducted under section 6a.

(16) “Tuition pupil” means a pupil of school age attending school in a district other than the pupil’s district of residence for whom tuition may be charged to the district of residence. Tuition pupil does not include a pupil who is a special education pupil, a pupil described in subsection (6)(c) to (o), or a pupil whose parent or guardian voluntarily enrolls the pupil in a district that is not the pupil’s district of residence. A pupil’s district of residence shall not require a high school tuition pupil, as provided under section 111, to attend another school district after the pupil has been assigned to a school district.

(17) “State school aid fund” means the state school aid fund established in section 11 of article IX of the state constitution of 1963.

(18) “Taxable value” means the taxable value of property as determined under section 27a of the general property tax act, 1893 PA 206, MCL 211.27a.

(19) “Textbook” means a book, electronic book, or other instructional print or electronic resource that is selected and approved by the governing board of a district and that contains a presentation of principles of a subject, or that is a literary work relevant to the study of a subject required for the use of classroom pupils, or another type of course material that forms the basis of classroom instruction.

(20) “Total state aid” or “total state school aid” means the total combined amount of all funds due to a district, intermediate district, or other entity under this article.

Sec. 11. (1) For the fiscal year ending September 30, 2017, there is appropriated for the public schools of this state and certain other state purposes relating to education the sum of $12,069,644,300.00 from the state school aid fund, the sum of $179,100,000.00 from the general fund, an amount not to exceed $72,000,000.00 from the community district education trust fund created under section 12 of the Michigan trust fund act, 2000 PA 489, MCL 12.262, and an amount not to exceed $100.00 from the water emergency reserve fund. For the fiscal year ending September 30, 2018, there is appropriated for the public schools of this state and certain other state purposes relating to education the sum of $12,547,270,300.00 $12,682,127,200.00 from the state school aid fund, the sum of $215,000,000.00 $78,500,000.00 from the general fund, an amount not to exceed $72,000,000.00 from the community district education trust fund created under section 12 of the Michigan trust fund act, 2000 PA 489, MCL 12.262, an amount not to exceed $23,100,000.00 from the MPSERS retirement obligation reform reserve fund, and an amount not to exceed $100.00 from the water emergency reserve fund. FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2019, THERE IS APPROPRIATED FOR THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THIS STATE AND CERTAIN OTHER STATE PURPOSES RELATING TO EDUCATION THE SUM OF $12,876,825,200.00 FROM THE STATE SCHOOL AID FUND, THE SUM OF $60,000,000.00 FROM THE GENERAL FUND, AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $72,000,000.00 FROM THE COMMUNITY DISTRICT EDUCATION TRUST FUND CREATED UNDER SECTION 12 OF THE MICHIGAN TRUST FUND ACT, 2000 PA 489, MCL 12.262, AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $31,900,000.00 FROM THE MPSERS RETIREMENT OBLIGATION REFORM RESERVE FUND, AND AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $100.00 FROM THE WATER EMERGENCY RESERVE FUND. In addition, all available federal funds are appropriated each fiscal year for the fiscal years ending September 30, 2017 2018 and September 30, 2018.2019.

(2) The appropriations under this section shall be allocated as provided in this article. Money appropriated under this section from the general fund shall be expended to fund the purposes of this article before the expenditure of money appropriated under this section from the state school aid fund.

(3) Any general fund allocations under this article that are not expended by the end of the state fiscal year are transferred to the school aid stabilization fund created under section 11a.

Sec. 11a. (1) The school aid stabilization fund is created as a separate account within the state school aid fund established by section 11 of article IX of the state constitution of 1963.

(2) The state treasurer may receive money or other assets from any source for deposit into the school aid stabilization fund. The state treasurer shall deposit into the school aid stabilization fund all of the following:

(a) Unexpended and unencumbered state school aid fund revenue for a fiscal year that remains in the state school aid fund as of the bookclosing for that fiscal year.

(b) Money statutorily dedicated to the school aid stabilization fund.

(c) Money appropriated to the school aid stabilization fund.

(3) Money available in the school aid stabilization fund may not be expended without a specific appropriation from the school aid stabilization fund. Money in the school aid stabilization fund shall be expended only for purposes for which state school aid fund money may be expended.

(4) The state treasurer shall direct the investment of the school aid stabilization fund. The state treasurer shall credit to the school aid stabilization fund interest and earnings from fund investments.

(5) Money in the school aid stabilization fund at the close of a fiscal year shall remain in the school aid stabilization fund and shall not lapse to the unreserved school aid fund balance or the general fund.

(6) If the maximum amount appropriated under section 11 from the state school aid fund for a fiscal year exceeds the amount available for expenditure from the state school aid fund for that fiscal year, there is appropriated from the school aid stabilization fund to the state school aid fund an amount equal to the projected shortfall as determined by the department of treasury, but not to exceed available money in the school aid stabilization fund. If the money in the school aid stabilization fund is insufficient to fully fund an amount equal to the projected shortfall, the state budget director shall notify the legislature as required under section 296(2) and state payments in an amount equal to the remainder of the projected shortfall shall be prorated in the manner provided under section 296(3).

(7) For 2016‑2017 and for 2017‑2018, 2018‑2019, in addition to the appropriations in section 11, there is appropriated from the school aid stabilization fund to the state school aid fund the amount necessary to fully fund the allocations under this article.

Sec. 11j. From the appropriation in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $125,500,000.00 for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for payments to the school loan bond redemption fund in the department of treasury on behalf of districts and intermediate districts. Notwithstanding section 296 or any other provision of this act, funds allocated under this section are not subject to proration and shall be paid in full.

Sec. 11k. For 2017‑2018, 2018‑2019, there is appropriated from the general fund to the school loan revolving fund an amount equal to the amount of school bond loans assigned to the Michigan finance authority, not to exceed the total amount of school bond loans held in reserve as long‑term assets. As used in this section, “school loan revolving fund” means that fund created in section 16c of the shared credit rating act, 1985 PA 227, MCL 141.1066c.

Sec. 11m. From the appropriation in section 11, there is allocated for 2016‑2017 an amount not to exceed $5,500,000.00 and there is allocated for 2017‑2018 an amount not to exceed $6,500,000.00 $18,000,000.00 AND THERE IS ALLOCATED FOR 2018‑2019 AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $24,000,000.00 for fiscal year cash‑flow borrowing costs solely related to the state school aid fund established by section 11 of article IX of the state constitution of 1963.

Sec. 11s. (1) From the general fund appropriation in section 11, there is allocated $10,142,500.00 for 2016‑2017 and there is allocated $8,730,000.00 for 2017‑2018 $3,230,000.00 FOR 2018‑2019 for the purpose of providing services and programs to children who reside within the boundaries of a district with the majority of its territory located within the boundaries of a city for which an executive proclamation of emergency is issued in the current or immediately preceding 2 3 fiscal years under the emergency management act, 1976 PA 390, MCL 30.401 to 30.421. From the funding appropriated in section 11, there is allocated for each fiscal year for 2016‑2017 and for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 $100.00 from the water emergency reserve fund for the purposes of this section.

(2) From the allocation in subsection (1), there is allocated to a district with the majority of its territory located within the boundaries of a city in which an executive proclamation of emergency is issued in the current or immediately preceding

2 fiscal years and that has at least 4,500 pupils in membership for the 2016‑2017 fiscal year or has at least 4,000 pupils in membership for a fiscal year after 2016‑2017, an amount not to exceed $1,292,500.00 for 2016‑2017 and an amount not to exceed $2,625,000.00 for 2017‑2018 $2,625,000.00 FOR 2018‑2019 for the purpose of employing school nurses, CLASSROOM AIDES, and school social workers. The district shall provide a report to the department in a form, manner, and frequency prescribed by the department. The department shall provide a copy of that report to the governor, the house and senate school aid subcommittees, the house and senate fiscal agencies, and the state budget director within 5 days after receipt. The report shall provide at least the following information:

(a) How many personnel were hired using the funds allocated under this subsection.

(b) A description of the services provided to pupils by those personnel.

(c) How many pupils received each type of service identified in subdivision (b).

(d) Any other information the department considers necessary to ensure that the children described in subsection (1) received appropriate levels and types of services.

(3) From the allocation in subsection (1), there is allocated to an intermediate district that has a constituent district described in subsection (2) an amount not to exceed $1,195,000.00 for 20162017 and an amount not to exceed $2,500,000.00 for 2017‑2018 to augment staff for the purpose of providing additional early childhood services and for nutritional services to children described in subsection (1), regardless of location of school of attendance. For 20162017, the early childhood services to be provided under this subsection are state early intervention services as described in subsection (4) and early literacy services. Beginning with 20172018, the early childhood services to be provided under this subsection are state early intervention services that are similar to the services described in the early on Michigan state plan, including ensuring that all children described in subsection (1) who are less than 4 years of age as of September 1, 2016 are assessed and evaluated at least twice annually. In addition, funds allocated under this subsection may also be expended to provide informational resources to parents, educators, and the community, and to coordinate services with other local agencies. The intermediate district shall provide a report to the department in a form, manner, and frequency approved by the department. The department shall provide a copy of that report to the governor, the house and senate school aid subcommittees, the house and senate fiscal agencies, and the state budget director within 5 days after receipt. The report shall provide at least the following information:

(a) How many personnel were hired using the funds appropriated in this subsection.

(b) A description of the services provided to children by those personnel.

(c) What types of additional nutritional services were provided.

(d) How many children received each type of service identified in subdivisions (b) and (c).

(e) What types of informational resources and coordination efforts were provided.

(f) Any other information the department considers necessary to ensure that the children described in subsection (1) received appropriate levels and types of services.

(3) (4) For 2016‑2017 2018‑2019 only, from the allocation in subsection (1), there is allocated an amount not to exceed $6,155,000.00 $0.00 to AN intermediate districts described in subsection (3) DISTRICT THAT HAS A CONSTITUENT DISTRICT DESCRIBED IN SUBSECTION (2) to provide state early intervention services for children described in subsection (1) who are less than 4 years of age as of September 1, 2016. The intermediate district shall use these funds to provide state early intervention services that are similar to the services described in the early on Michigan state plan, including ensuring that all children described in subsection (1) who are less than 4 years of age as of September 1, 2016 are assessed and evaluated at least twice annually.

(5) From the allocation in subsection (1), there is allocated an amount not to exceed $1,500,000.00 for 2016‑2017 and an amount not to exceed $3,000,000.00 for 2017‑2018 to intermediate districts described in subsection (3) to enroll children described in subsection (1) in school‑day great start readiness programs, regardless of household income eligibility requirements contained in section 39. The department shall administer this funding consistent with all other provisions of the great start readiness programs contained in section 32d and section 39.

(4) (6) For 2017‑2018, 2018‑2019, from the allocation in subsection (1), there is allocated an amount not to exceed $605,000.00 for nutritional services to children described in subsection (1).

(5) (7) In addition to other funding allocated and appropriated in this section, there is appropriated an amount not to exceed $15,000,000.00 each fiscal year for 2016‑2017 and 2017‑2018 FOR FISCAL YEAR 2018‑2019 for state restricted contingency funds. These contingency funds are not available for expenditure until they have been transferred to a section within this article under section 393(2) of the management and budget act, 1984 PA 431, MCL 18.1393.

(6) (8) Notwithstanding section 17b, payments under this section shall be paid on a schedule determined by the department.

Sec. 15. (1) If a district or intermediate district fails to receive its proper apportionment, the department, upon satisfactory proof that the district or intermediate district was entitled justly, shall apportion the deficiency in the next apportionment. Subject to subsections (2) and (3), if a district or intermediate district has received more than its proper apportionment, the department, upon satisfactory proof, shall deduct the excess in the next apportionment. Notwithstanding any other provision in this article, state aid overpayments to a district, other than overpayments in payments for special education or special education transportation, may be recovered from any payment made under this article other than a special education or special education transportation payment, from the proceeds of a loan to the district under the emergency municipal loan act, 1980 PA 243, MCL 141.931 to 141.942, or from the proceeds of millage levied or pledged under section 1211 of the revised school code, MCL 380.1211. State aid overpayments made in special education or special education transportation payments may be recovered from subsequent special education or special education transportation payments, from the proceeds of a loan to the district under the emergency municipal loan act, 1980 PA 243, MCL 141.931 to 141.942, or from the proceeds of millage levied or pledged under section 1211 of the revised school code, MCL 380.1211.

(2) If the result of an audit conducted by or for the department affects the current fiscal year membership, affected payments shall be adjusted in the current fiscal year. A deduction due to an adjustment made as a result of an audit conducted by or for the department, or as a result of information obtained by the department from the district, an intermediate district, the department of treasury, or the office of auditor general, shall be deducted from the district’s apportionments when the adjustment is finalized. At the request of the district and upon the district presenting evidence satisfactory to the department of the hardship, the department may grant up to an additional 9 years for the adjustment and may advance payments to the district otherwise authorized under this article if the district would otherwise experience a significant hardship in satisfying its financial obligations. At the request of a district and upon the district presenting evidence satisfactory to the department of the hardship, the department may waive all or a portion of the adjustments under this subsection if the department determines that all of the following apply:

(a) The district would otherwise experience a significant hardship in satisfying its financial obligations.

(b) The district would otherwise experience a significant hardship in satisfying its responsibility to provide instruction to its pupils.

(c) The district has taken sufficient corrective action to ensure that the circumstance or circumstances that necessitated the adjustment under this subsection do not recur.

(3) If, based on an audit by the department or the department’s designee or because of new or updated information received by the department, the department determines that the amount paid to a district or intermediate district under this article for the current fiscal year or a prior fiscal year was incorrect, the department shall make the appropriate deduction or payment in the district’s or intermediate district’s allocation in the next apportionment after the adjustment is finalized. The deduction or payment shall be calculated according to the law in effect in the fiscal year in which the incorrect amount was paid. If the district does not receive an allocation for the fiscal year or if the allocation is not sufficient to pay the amount of any deduction, the amount of any deduction otherwise applicable shall be satisfied from the proceeds of a loan to the district under the emergency municipal loan act, 1980 PA 243, MCL 141.931 to 141.942, or from the proceeds of millage levied or pledged under section 1211 of the revised school code, MCL 380.1211, as determined by the department.

(4) The department may conduct audits, or may direct audits by designee of the department, for the current fiscal year and the immediately preceding 3 fiscal years YEAR of all records related to a program for which a district or intermediate district has received funds under this article.

(5) Expenditures made by the department under this article that are caused by the write‑off of prior year accruals may be funded by revenue from the write‑off of prior year accruals.

(6) The department shall not deduct any funds from a district due to a pupil being counted in membership before the effective date of the amendatory act that added section 6(4)(jj), or otherwise reduce an allocation under this article to a district relative to the counting of a pupil in membership as provided under section 6(4)(jj), if the district substantially complied with the requirements under section 6(4)(jj) in a previous fiscal year as if section 6(4)(jj) had been in effect in the previous fiscal year.

(6) (7) In addition to funds appropriated in section 11 for all programs and services, there is appropriated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for obligations in excess of applicable appropriations an amount equal to the collection of overpayments, but not to exceed amounts available from overpayments.

SEC. 17C. (1) EXCEPT AS OTHERWISE PROVIDED UNDER THIS ARTICLE, THE DEPARTMENT SHALL DO BOTH OF THE FOLLOWING FOR FUNDS APPROPRIATED UNDER THIS ARTICLE FOR GRANTS DISTRIBUTED BY THE DEPARTMENT TO DISTRICTS, INTERMEDIATE DISTRICTS, AND ELIGIBLE ENTITIES:

(A) NOT LATER THAN SEPTEMBER 1 OF EACH FISCAL YEAR, OPEN THE GRANT APPLICATION FOR FUNDS APPROPRIATED FOR THE SUBSEQUENT FISCAL YEAR. THE DEPARTMENT SHALL ALSO PROVIDE TO DISTRICTS, INTERMEDIATE DISTRICTS, AND ELIGIBLE ENTITIES, AND POST ON ITS PUBLICLY ACCESSIBLE WEBSITE, THE GRANT APPLICATION AND AWARD PROCESS SCHEDULE AND THE LIST OF STATE GRANTS AND CONTRACTS AVAILABLE IN THE SUBSEQUENT FISCAL YEAR.

(B) NOT LATER THAN DECEMBER 1 OF EACH FISCAL YEAR, PUBLISH GRANT AWARDS FOR FUNDS APPROPRIATED IN THAT FISCAL YEAR.

(2) INFORMATION FOR GRANTS AWARDED FROM FUNDS APPROPRIATED UNDER THIS ARTICLE MUST BE PLACED ON THE STATE BOARD AGENDA IN AUGUST OF THE PRECEDING FISCAL YEAR.

Sec. 18. (1) Except as provided in another section of this article, each district or other entity shall apply the money received by the district or entity under this article to salaries and other compensation of teachers and other employees, tuition, transportation, lighting, heating, ventilation, water service, the purchase of textbooks, other supplies, and any other school operating expenditures defined in section 7. However, not more than 20% of the total amount received by a district under sections 22a and 22b or received by an intermediate district under section 81 may be transferred by the board to either the capital projects fund or to the debt retirement fund for debt service. The money shall not be applied or taken for a purpose other than as provided in this section. The department shall determine the reasonableness of expenditures and may withhold from a recipient of funds under this article the apportionment otherwise due upon a violation by the recipient.

(2) A district or intermediate district shall adopt an annual budget in a manner that complies with the uniform budgeting and accounting act, 1968 PA 2, MCL 141.421 to 141.440a. Within 15 days after a district board adopts its annual operating budget for the following school fiscal year, or after a district board adopts a subsequent revision to that budget, the district shall make all of the following available through a link on its website homepage, or may make the information available through a link on its intermediate district’s website homepage, in a form and manner prescribed by the department:

(a) The annual operating budget and subsequent budget revisions.

(b) Using data that have already been collected and submitted to the department, a summary of district expenditures for the most recent fiscal year for which they are available, expressed in the following 2 pie charts:VISUAL DISPLAYS:

(i) A chart of personnel expenditures, broken into the following subcategories:

(A) Salaries and wages.

(B) Employee benefit costs, including, but not limited to, medical, dental, vision, life, disability, and long‑term care benefits.

(C) Retirement benefit costs.

(D) All other personnel costs.

(ii) A chart of all district expenditures, broken into the following subcategories:

(A) Instruction.

(B) Support services.

(C) Business and administration.

(D) Operations and maintenance.

(c) Links to all of the following:

(i) The current collective bargaining agreement for each bargaining unit.

(ii) Each health care benefits plan, including, but not limited to, medical, dental, vision, disability, long‑term care, or any other type of benefits that would constitute health care services, offered to any bargaining unit or employee in the district.

(iii) The audit report of the audit conducted under subsection (4) for the most recent fiscal year for which it is available.

(iv) The bids required under section 5 of the public employees health benefits BENEFIT act, 2007 PA 106, MCL 124.75.

(v) The district’s written policy governing procurement of supplies, materials, and equipment.

(vi) The district’s written policy establishing specific categories of reimbursable expenses, as described in section 1254(2) of the revised school code, MCL 380.1254.

(vii) Either the district’s accounts payable check register for the most recent school fiscal year or a statement of the total amount of expenses incurred by board members or employees of the district that were reimbursed by the district for the most recent school fiscal year.

(d) The total salary and a description and cost of each fringe benefit included in the compensation package for the superintendent of the district and for each employee of the district whose salary exceeds $100,000.00.

(e) The annual amount spent on dues paid to associations.

(f) The annual amount spent on lobbying or lobbying services. As used in this subdivision, “lobbying” means that term as defined in section 5 of 1978 PA 472, MCL 4.415.

(g) Any deficit elimination plan or enhanced deficit elimination plan the district was required to submit under the revised school code.

(h) Identification of all credit cards maintained by the district as district credit cards, the identity of all individuals authorized to use each of those credit cards, the credit limit on each credit card, and the dollar limit, if any, for each individual’s authorized use of the credit card.

(i) Costs incurred for each instance of out‑of‑state travel by the school administrator of the district that is fully or partially paid for by the district and the details of each of those instances of out‑of‑state travel, including at least identification of each individual on the trip, destination, and purpose.

(3) For the information required under subsection (2)(a), (2)(b)(i), and (2)(c), an intermediate district shall provide the same information in the same manner as required for a district under subsection (2).

(4) For the purposes of determining the reasonableness of expenditures, whether a district or intermediate district has received the proper amount of funds under this article, and whether a violation of this article has occurred, all of the following apply:

(a) The department shall require that each district and intermediate district have an audit of the district’s or intermediate district’s financial and pupil accounting records conducted at least annually, and at such other times as determined by the department, at the expense of the district or intermediate district, as applicable. The audits must be performed by a certified public accountant or by the intermediate district superintendent, as may be required by the department, or in the case of a district of the first class by a certified public accountant, the intermediate superintendent, or the auditor general of the city. A district or intermediate district shall retain these records for the current fiscal year and from at least the 3 immediately preceding fiscal years.

(b) If a district operates in a single building with fewer than 700 full‑time equated pupils, if the district has stable membership, and if the error rate of the immediately preceding 2 pupil accounting field audits of the district is less than 2%, the district may have a pupil accounting field audit conducted biennially but must continue to have desk audits for each pupil count. The auditor must document compliance with the audit cycle in the pupil auditing manual. As used in this subdivision, “stable membership” means that the district’s membership for the current fiscal year varies from the district’s membership for the immediately preceding fiscal year by less than 5%.

(c) A district’s or intermediate district’s annual financial audit shall include an analysis of the financial and pupil accounting data used as the basis for distribution of state school aid.

(d) The pupil and financial accounting records and reports, audits, and management letters are subject to requirements established in the auditing and accounting manuals approved and published by the department.

(e) All of the following shall be done not later than November 1 each year for reporting the prior fiscal year data:

(i) A district shall file the annual financial audit reports with the intermediate district and the department.

(ii) The intermediate district shall file the annual financial audit reports for the intermediate district with the department.

(iii) The intermediate district shall enter the pupil membership audit reports for its constituent districts and for the intermediate district, for the pupil membership count day and supplemental count day, in the Michigan student data system.

(f) The annual financial audit reports and pupil accounting procedures reports shall be available to the public in compliance with the freedom of information act, 1976 PA 442, MCL 15.231 to 15.246.

(g) Not later than January 31 of each year, the department shall notify the state budget director and the legislative appropriations subcommittees responsible for review of the school aid budget of districts and intermediate districts that have not filed an annual financial audit and pupil accounting procedures report required under this section for the school year ending in the immediately preceding fiscal year.

(5) By November 1 each fiscal year, each district and intermediate district shall submit to the center, in a manner prescribed by the center, annual comprehensive financial data consistent with the district’s or intermediate district’s audited financial statements and consistent with accounting manuals and charts of accounts approved and published by the department. For an intermediate district, the report shall also contain the website address where the department can access the report required under section 620 of the revised school code, MCL 380.620. The department shall ensure that the prescribed Michigan public school accounting manual chart of accounts includes standard conventions to distinguish expenditures by allowable fund function and object. The functions shall include at minimum categories for instruction, pupil support, instructional staff support, general administration, school administration, business administration, transportation, facilities operation and maintenance, facilities acquisition, and debt service; and shall include object classifications of salary, benefits, including categories for active employee health expenditures, purchased services, supplies, capital outlay, and other. Districts shall report the required level of detail consistent with the manual as part of the comprehensive annual financial report.

(6) By September 30 of each year, each district and intermediate district shall file with the department CENTER the special education actual cost report, known as “SE‑4096”, on a form and in the manner prescribed by the department.CENTER. AN INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT SHALL PERFORM THE AUDIT OF A DISTRICT’S REPORT.

(7) By October 7 of each year, each district and intermediate district shall file with the center the AUDITED transportation expenditure report, known as “SE‑4094”, on a form and in the manner prescribed by the center. AN INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT SHALL PERFORM THE AUDIT OF A DISTRICT’S REPORT.

(8) The department shall review its pupil accounting and pupil auditing manuals at least annually and shall periodically update those manuals to reflect changes in this article.

(9) If a district that is a public school academy purchases property using money received under this article, the public school academy shall retain ownership of the property unless the public school academy sells the property at fair market value.

(10) If a district or intermediate district does not comply with subsections (4), (5), (6), and (7), AND (12), or if the department determines that the financial data required under subsection (5) are not consistent with audited financial statements, the department shall withhold all state school aid due to the district or intermediate district under this article, beginning with the next payment due to the district or intermediate district, until the district or intermediate district complies with subsections (4), (5), (6), and (7), AND (12). If the district or intermediate district does not comply with subsections (4), (5), (6), and (7), AND (12) by the end of the fiscal year, the district or intermediate district forfeits the amount withheld.

(11) If a district or intermediate district does not comply with subsection (2), the department may withhold up to 10% of the total state school aid due to the district or intermediate district under this article, beginning with the next payment due to the district or intermediate district, until the district or intermediate district complies with subsection (2). If the district or intermediate district does not comply with subsection (2) by the end of the fiscal year, the district or intermediate district forfeits the amount withheld.

(12) By November 1 of each year, if a district or intermediate district offers virtual learning under section 21f, OR FOR A SCHOOL OF EXCELLENCE THAT IS A CYBER SCHOOL, AS DEFINED IN SECTION 551 OF THE REVISED SCHOOL CODE, MCL 380.551, the district or intermediate district shall submit to the department a report that details the per‑pupil costs of operating the virtual learning by vendor type AND VIRTUAL LEARNING MODEL. The report shall include at least all of the following information concerning the operation of virtual learning for the immediately preceding school fiscal year:

(a) The name of the district operating the virtual learning and of each district that enrolled students in the virtual learning.

(b) The total number of students enrolled in the virtual learning and the total number of membership pupils enrolled in the virtual learning.

(c) For each pupil who is enrolled in a district other than the district offering virtual learning, the name of that district.

(d) The district in which the pupil was enrolled before enrolling in the district offering virtual learning.

(e) The number of participating students who had previously dropped out of school.

(f) The number of participating students who had previously been expelled from school.

(g) The total cost to enroll a student in the program. This cost shall be reported on a per‑pupil, per‑course, per‑semester or trimester basis by vendor type. The total shall include costs broken down by cost for content development, content licensing, training, virtual instruction and instructional support, personnel, hardware and software, payment to each virtual learning provider, and other costs associated with operating virtual learning.

(h) The name of each virtual education provider contracted by the district and the state in which each virtual education provider is headquartered.YEAR, INCLUDING INFORMATION CONCERNING SUMMER PROGRAMMING. INFORMATION MUST BE COLLECTED IN A FORM AND MANNER DETERMINED BY THE DEPARTMENT AND MUST BE COLLECTED IN THE MOST EFFICIENT MANNER POSSIBLE TO REDUCE THE ADMINISTRATIVE BURDEN ON REPORTING ENTITIES.

(13) By March 31 of each year, the department shall submit to the house and senate appropriations subcommittees on state school aid, the state budget director, and the house and senate fiscal agencies a report summarizing the per‑pupil costs by vendor type of virtual courses available under section 21f AND VIRTUAL COURSES PROVIDED BY A SCHOOL OF EXCELLENCE THAT IS A CYBER SCHOOL, AS DEFINED IN SECTION 551 OF THE REVISED SCHOOL CODE, MCL 380.551.

(14) As used in subsections (12) and (13), “vendor type” means the following:

(a) Virtual courses provided by the Michigan Virtual University.

(b) Virtual courses provided by a school of excellence that is a cyber school, as defined in section 551 of the revised school code, MCL 380.551.

(c) Virtual courses provided by third party vendors not affiliated with a Michigan public school.

(d) Virtual courses created and offered by a district or intermediate district.

(15) An allocation to a district or another entity under this article is contingent upon the district’s or entity’s compliance with this section.

(16) Beginning October 1, 2017, and not less than once every 3 months after that date, the 2018, AND ANNUALLY THEREAFTER, THE department shall submit to the senate and house subcommittees on school aid and to the senate and house standing committees on education an itemized list of allocations under this article to any association or consortium consisting of associations IN THE IMMEDIATELY PRECEDING FISCAL YEAR. The report shall detail the recipient or recipients, the amount allocated, and the purpose for which the funds were distributed.

Sec. 19. (1) A district or intermediate district shall comply with all applicable reporting requirements specified in state and federal law. Data provided to the center, in a form and manner prescribed by the center, shall be aggregated and disaggregated as required by state and federal law. In addition, a district or intermediate district shall cooperate with all measures taken by the center to establish and maintain a statewide P‑20 longitudinal data system.

(2) Each district shall furnish to the center not later than 5 weeks after the pupil membership count day and by June 30 THE LAST BUSINESS DAY IN JUNE of the school fiscal year ending in the fiscal year, in a manner prescribed by the center, the information necessary for the preparation of the district and high school graduation report AND FOR THE PREPARATION OF THE STATE AND FEDERAL ACCOUNTABILITY REPORTS. This information shall meet requirements established in the pupil auditing manual approved and published by the department. The center shall calculate an annual graduation and pupil dropout rate for each high school, each district, and this state, in compliance with nationally recognized standards for these calculations. The center shall report all graduation and dropout rates to the senate and house education committees and appropriations committees, the state budget director, and the department not later than 30 days after the publication of the list described in subsection (5). Before reporting these graduation and dropout rates, the department shall allow a school or district to appeal the calculations. The department shall consider and act upon the appeal within 30 days after it is submitted and shall not report these graduation and dropout rates until after all appeals have been considered and decided.

(3) By the first business day in December and by June 30 THE LAST BUSINESS DAY IN JUNE of each year, a district shall furnish to the center, in a manner prescribed by the center, information related to educational personnel as necessary for reporting required by state and federal law. For the purposes of this subsection, the center shall only require districts and intermediate districts to report information that is not already available from the office of retirement services in the department of technology, management, and budget.

(4) If a district or intermediate district fails to meet the requirements of this section, the department shall withhold 5% of the total funds for which the district or intermediate district qualifies under this article until the district or intermediate district complies with all of those subsections. If the district or intermediate district does not comply with all of those subsections by the end of the fiscal year, the department shall place the amount withheld in an escrow account until the district or intermediate district complies with all of those subsections.

(5) Before publishing a list of school or district accountability designations as required by the no child left behind act of 2001, Public Law 107‑110, or the every student succeeds act, Public Law 114‑95, AND UTILIZING DATA THAT WERE CERTIFIED AS ACCURATE AND COMPLETE AFTER DISTRICTS AND INTERMEDIATE DISTRICTS ADHERED TO DEADLINES, DATA QUALITY REVIEWS, AND CORRECTION PROCESSES LEADING TO LOCAL CERTIFICATION OF FINAL STUDENT DATA IN SUBSECTION (2), the department shall allow a school or district to appeal that determination. ANY CALCULATION ERRORS USED IN THE PREPARATION OF ACCOUNTABILITY METRICS. The department shall consider and act upon the appeal within 30 days after it is submitted and shall not publish the list until after all appeals have been considered and decided.

(6) Beginning in 2016‑2017, the department shall implement statewide standard reporting requirements for education data approved by the department in conjunction with the center. The department shall work with the center, intermediate districts, districts, and other interested stakeholders to implement this policy change. A district or intermediate district shall implement the statewide standard reporting requirements not later than 2017‑2018 or when a district or intermediate district updates its education data reporting system, whichever is later.

Sec. 20. (1) For 2017‑2018, 2018‑2019, both of the following apply:

(a) The basic foundation allowance is $8,289.00.$8,409.00.

(b) The minimum foundation allowance is $7,631.00.$7,871.00.

(2) The amount of each district’s foundation allowance shall be calculated as provided in this section, using a basic foundation allowance in the amount specified in subsection (1).

(3) Except as otherwise provided in this section, the amount of a district’s foundation allowance shall be calculated as follows, using in all calculations the total amount of the district’s foundation allowance as calculated before any proration:

(a) Except as otherwise provided in this subdivision, for a district that had a foundation allowance for the immediately preceding state fiscal year that was at least equal to the minimum foundation allowance for the immediately preceding state fiscal year, but less than the basic foundation allowance for the immediately preceding state fiscal year, the district shall receive a foundation allowance in an amount equal to the sum of the district’s foundation allowance for the immediately preceding state fiscal year plus the difference between twice the dollar amount of the adjustment from the immediately preceding state fiscal year to the current state fiscal year made in the basic foundation allowance and [(the difference between the basic foundation allowance for the current state fiscal year and basic foundation allowance for the immediately preceding state fiscal year minus $20.00) $40.00) times (the difference between the district’s foundation allowance for the immediately preceding state fiscal year and the minimum foundation allowance for the immediately preceding state fiscal year) divided by the difference between the basic foundation allowance for the current state fiscal year and the minimum foundation allowance for the immediately preceding state fiscal year.] However, the foundation allowance for a district that had less than the basic foundation allowance for the immediately preceding state fiscal year shall not exceed the basic foundation allowance for the current state fiscal year.

(b) Except as otherwise provided in this subsection, for a district that in the immediately preceding state fiscal year had a foundation allowance in an amount equal to the amount of the basic foundation allowance for the immediately preceding state fiscal year, the district shall receive a foundation allowance for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 in an amount equal to the basic foundation allowance for 2017‑2018.2018‑2019.

(c) For a district that had a foundation allowance for the immediately preceding state fiscal year that was greater than the basic foundation allowance for the immediately preceding state fiscal year, the district’s foundation allowance is an amount equal to the sum of the district’s foundation allowance for the immediately preceding state fiscal year plus the lesser of the increase in the basic foundation allowance for the current state fiscal year, as compared to the immediately preceding state fiscal year, or the product of the district’s foundation allowance for the immediately preceding state fiscal year times the percentage increase in the United States consumer price index in the calendar year ending in the immediately preceding fiscal year as reported by the May revenue estimating conference conducted under section 367b of the management and budget act, 1984 PA 431, MCL 18.1367b.

(d) For a district that has a foundation allowance that is not a whole dollar amount, the district’s foundation allowance shall be rounded up to the nearest whole dollar.

(e) For a district that received a foundation allowance supplemental payment calculated under section 20m and paid under section 22b for 2016‑2017, 2017‑2018, the district’s 2016‑2017 2017‑2018 foundation allowance is considered to have been an amount equal to the sum of the district’s actual 2016‑2017 2017‑2018 foundation allowance as otherwise calculated under this section plus the lesser of the per pupil amount of the district’s supplemental payment for 2016‑2017 2017‑2018 as calculated under section 20m or the product of the district’s foundation allowance for the immediately preceding state fiscal year times the percentage increase in the United States consumer price index in the calendar year ending in the immediately preceding fiscal year as reported by the May revenue estimating conference conducted under section 367b of the management and budget act, 1984 PA 431, MCL 18.1367b.

(4) Except as otherwise provided in this subsection, beginning in 2014‑2015, the state portion of a district’s foundation allowance is an amount equal to the district’s foundation allowance or the basic foundation allowance for the current state fiscal year, whichever is less, minus the local portion of the district’s foundation allowance. For a district described in subsection (3)(c), beginning in 2014‑2015, the state portion of the district’s foundation allowance is an amount equal to $6,962.00 plus the difference between the district’s foundation allowance for the current state fiscal year and the district’s foundation allowance for 1998‑99, minus the local portion of the district’s foundation allowance. For a district that has a millage reduction required under section 31 of article IX of the state constitution of 1963, the state portion of the district’s foundation allowance shall be calculated as if that reduction did not occur. For a receiving district, if school operating taxes continue to be levied on behalf of a dissolved district that has been attached in whole or in part to the receiving district to satisfy debt obligations of the dissolved district under section 12 of the revised school code, MCL 380.12, the taxable value per membership pupil of property in the receiving district used for the purposes of this subsection does not include the taxable value of property within the geographic area of the dissolved district. For a community district, if school operating taxes continue to be levied by a qualifying school district under section 12b of the revised school code, MCL 380.12b, with the same geographic area as the community district, the taxable value per membership pupil of property in the community district to be used for the purposes of this subsection does not include the taxable value of property within the geographic area of the community district.

(5) The allocation calculated under this section for a pupil shall be based on the foundation allowance of the pupil’s district of residence. For a pupil enrolled pursuant to section 105 or 105c in a district other than the pupil’s district of residence, the allocation calculated under this section shall be based on the lesser of the foundation allowance of the pupil’s district of residence or the foundation allowance of the educating district. For a pupil in membership in a K‑5, K‑6, or K‑8 district who is enrolled in another district in a grade not offered by the pupil’s district of residence, the allocation calculated under this section shall be based on the foundation allowance of the educating district if the educating district’s foundation allowance is greater than the foundation allowance of the pupil’s district of residence. The calculation under this subsection shall take into account a district’s per‑pupil allocation under section 20m.

(6) Except as otherwise provided in this subsection, for pupils in membership, other than special education pupils, in a public school academy, the allocation calculated under this section is an amount per membership pupil other than special education pupils in the public school academy equal to the foundation allowance of the district in which the public school academy is located or the state maximum public school academy allocation, whichever is less. Except as otherwise provided in this subsection, for pupils in membership, other than special education pupils, in a public school academy that is a cyber school and is authorized by a school district, the allocation calculated under this section is an amount per membership pupil other than special education pupils in the public school academy equal to the foundation allowance of the district that authorized the public school academy or the state maximum public school academy allocation, whichever is less. However, a public school academy that had an allocation under this subsection before 2009‑2010 that was equal to the sum of the local school operating revenue per membership pupil other than special education pupils for the district in which the public school academy is located and the state portion of that district’s foundation allowance shall not have that allocation reduced as a result of the 2010 amendment to this subsection. Notwithstanding section 101, for a public school academy that begins operations after the pupil membership count day, the amount per membership pupil calculated under this subsection shall be adjusted by multiplying that amount per membership pupil by the number of hours of pupil instruction provided by the public school academy after it begins operations, as determined by the department, divided by the minimum number of hours of pupil instruction required under section 101(3). The result of this calculation shall not exceed the amount per membership pupil otherwise calculated under this subsection.

(7) Except as otherwise provided in this subsection, for pupils in membership, other than special education pupils, in a community district, the allocation calculated under this section is an amount per membership pupil other than special education pupils in the community district equal to the foundation allowance of the qualifying school district, as described in section 12b of the revised school code, MCL 380.12b, that is located within the same geographic area as the community district.

(8) Subject to subsection (4), for a district that is formed or reconfigured after June 1, 2002 by consolidation of 2 or more districts or by annexation, the resulting district’s foundation allowance under this section beginning after the effective date of the consolidation or annexation shall be the lesser of the sum of the average of the foundation allowances of each of the original or affected districts, calculated as provided in this section, weighted as to the percentage of pupils in total membership in the resulting district who reside in the geographic area of each of the original or affected districts plus $100.00 or the highest foundation allowance among the original or affected districts. This subsection does not apply to a receiving district unless there is a subsequent consolidation or annexation that affects the district. The calculation under this subsection shall take into account a district’s per‑pupil allocation under section 20m.

(9) Each fraction used in making calculations under this section shall be rounded to the fourth decimal place and the dollar amount of an increase in the basic foundation allowance shall be rounded to the nearest whole dollar.

(10) State payments related to payment of the foundation allowance for a special education pupil are not calculated under this section but are instead calculated under section 51a.

(11) To assist the legislature in determining the basic foundation allowance for the subsequent state fiscal year, each revenue estimating conference conducted under section 367b of the management and budget act, 1984 PA 431, MCL 18.1367b, shall calculate a pupil membership factor, a revenue adjustment factor, and an index as follows:

(a) The pupil membership factor shall be computed by dividing the estimated membership in the school year ending in the current state fiscal year, excluding intermediate district membership, by the estimated membership for the school year ending in the subsequent state fiscal year, excluding intermediate district membership. If a consensus membership factor is not determined at the revenue estimating conference, the principals of the revenue estimating conference shall report their estimates to the house and senate subcommittees responsible for school aid appropriations not later than 7 days after the conclusion of the revenue conference.

(b) The revenue adjustment factor shall be computed by dividing the sum of the estimated total state school aid fund revenue for the subsequent state fiscal year plus the estimated total state school aid fund revenue for the current state fiscal year, adjusted for any change in the rate or base of a tax the proceeds of which are deposited in that fund and excluding money transferred into that fund from the countercyclical budget and economic stabilization fund under the management and budget act, 1984 PA 431, MCL 18.1101 to 18.1594, by the sum of the estimated total school aid fund revenue for the current state fiscal year plus the estimated total state school aid fund revenue for the immediately preceding state fiscal year, adjusted for any change in the rate or base of a tax the proceeds of which are deposited in that fund. If a consensus revenue factor is not determined at the revenue estimating conference, the principals of the revenue estimating conference shall report their estimates to the house and senate subcommittees responsible for school aid appropriations not later than 7 days after the conclusion of the revenue conference.

(c) The index shall be calculated by multiplying the pupil membership factor by the revenue adjustment factor. If a consensus index is not determined at the revenue estimating conference, the principals of the revenue estimating conference shall report their estimates to the house and senate subcommittees responsible for school aid appropriations not later than 7 days after the conclusion of the revenue conference.

(12) Payments to districts and public school academies shall not be made under this section. Rather, the calculations under this section shall be used to determine the amount of state payments under section 22b.

(13) If an amendment to section 2 of article VIII of the state constitution of 1963 allowing state aid to some or all nonpublic schools is approved by the voters of this state, each foundation allowance or per‑pupil payment calculation under this section may be reduced.

(14) As used in this section:

(a) “Certified mills” means the lesser of 18 mills or the number of mills of school operating taxes levied by the district in 1993‑94.

(b) “Combined state and local revenue” means the aggregate of the district’s state school aid received by or paid on behalf of the district under this section and the district’s local school operating revenue.

(c) “Combined state and local revenue per membership pupil” means the district’s combined state and local revenue divided by the district’s membership excluding special education pupils.

(d) “Current state fiscal year” means the state fiscal year for which a particular calculation is made.

(e) “Dissolved district” means a district that loses its organization, has its territory attached to 1 or more other districts, and is dissolved as provided under section 12 of the revised school code, MCL 380.12.

(f) “Immediately preceding state fiscal year” means the state fiscal year immediately preceding the current state fiscal year.

(g) “Local portion of the district’s foundation allowance” means an amount that is equal to the difference between (the sum of the product of the taxable value per membership pupil of all property in the district that is nonexempt property times the district’s certified mills and, for a district with certified mills exceeding 12, the product of the taxable value per membership pupil of property in the district that is commercial personal property times the certified mills minus 12 mills) and (the quotient of the product of the captured assessed valuation under tax increment financing acts times the district’s certified mills divided by the district’s membership excluding special education pupils).

(h) “Local school operating revenue” means school operating taxes levied under section 1211 of the revised school code, MCL 380.1211. For a receiving district, if school operating taxes are to be levied on behalf of a dissolved district that has been attached in whole or in part to the receiving district to satisfy debt obligations of the dissolved district under section 12 of the revised school code, MCL 380.12, local school operating revenue does not include school operating taxes levied within the geographic area of the dissolved district.

(i) “Local school operating revenue per membership pupil” means a district’s local school operating revenue divided by the district’s membership excluding special education pupils.

(j) “Maximum public school academy allocation”, except as otherwise provided in this subdivision, means the maximum per‑pupil allocation as calculated by adding the highest per‑pupil allocation among all public school academies for the immediately preceding state fiscal year plus the difference between twice the amount of the difference between the basic foundation allowance for the current state fiscal year and the basic foundation allowance for the immediately preceding state fiscal year and [(the amount of the difference between the basic foundation allowance for the current state fiscal year and the basic foundation allowance for the immediately preceding state fiscal year minus $20.00) $40.00) times (the difference between the highest per‑pupil allocation among all public school academies for the immediately preceding state fiscal year and the minimum foundation allowance for the immediately preceding state fiscal year) divided by the difference between the basic foundation allowance for the current state fiscal year and the minimum foundation allowance for the immediately preceding state fiscal year.] For the purposes of this subdivision, for 2017‑2018, 2018‑2019, the maximum public school academy allocation is $7,631.00.$7,871.00.

(k) “Membership” means the definition of that term under section 6 as in effect for the particular fiscal year for which a particular calculation is made.

(l) “Nonexempt property” means property that is not a principal residence, qualified agricultural property, qualified forest property, supportive housing property, industrial personal property, commercial personal property, or property occupied by a public school academy.

(m) “Principal residence”, “qualified agricultural property”, “qualified forest property”, “supportive housing property”, “industrial personal property”, and “commercial personal property” mean those terms as defined in section 1211 of the revised school code, MCL 380.1211.

(n) “Receiving district” means a district to which all or part of the territory of a dissolved district is attached under section 12 of the revised school code, MCL 380.12.

(o) “School operating purposes” means the purposes included in the operation costs of the district as prescribed in sections 7 and 18 and purposes authorized under section 1211 of the revised school code, MCL 380.1211.

(p) “School operating taxes” means local ad valorem property taxes levied under section 1211 of the revised school code, MCL 380.1211, and retained for school operating purposes.

(q) “Tax increment financing acts” means 1975 PA 197, MCL 125.1651 to 125.1681, the tax increment finance authority act, 1980 PA 450, MCL 125.1801 to 125.1830, the local development financing act, 1986 PA 281, MCL 125.2151 to 125.2174, the brownfield redevelopment financing act, 1996 PA 381, MCL 125.2651 to 125.2672, 125.2670, or the corridor improvement authority act, 2005 PA 280, MCL 125.2871 to 125.2899.

(r) “Taxable value per membership pupil” means taxable value, as certified by the county treasurer and reported to the department, for the calendar year ending in the current state fiscal year divided by the district’s membership excluding special education pupils for the school year ending in the current state fiscal year.

Sec. 20d. In making the final determination required under former section 20a of a district’s combined state and local revenue per membership pupil in 1993‑94 and in making calculations under section 20 for 2017‑2018, 2018‑2019, the department and the department of treasury shall comply with all of the following:

(a) For a district that had combined state and local revenue per membership pupil in the 1994‑95 state fiscal year of $6,500.00 or more and served as a fiscal agent for a state board designated area vocational education center in the 1993‑94 school year, total state school aid received by or paid on behalf of the district pursuant to this act in 1993‑94 shall exclude payments made under former section 146 and under section 147 on behalf of the district’s employees who provided direct services to the area vocational education center. Not later than June 30, 1996, the department shall make an adjustment under this subdivision to the district’s combined state and local revenue per membership pupil in the 1994‑95 state fiscal year and the department of treasury shall make a final certification of the number of mills that may be levied by the district under section 1211 of the revised school code, MCL 380.1211, as a result of the adjustment under this subdivision.

(b) If a district had an adjustment made to its 1993‑94 total state school aid that excluded payments made under former section 146 and under section 147 on behalf of the district’s employees who provided direct services for intermediate district center programs operated by the district under sections 51 to 56, if nonresident pupils attending the center programs were included in the district’s membership for purposes of calculating the combined state and local revenue per membership pupil for 1993‑94, and if there is a signed agreement by all constituent districts of the intermediate district that an adjustment under this subdivision shall be made, the foundation allowances for 1995‑96 and 1996‑97 of all districts that had pupils attending the intermediate district center program operated by the district that had the adjustment shall be calculated as if their combined state and local revenue per membership pupil for 1993‑94 included resident pupils attending the center program and excluded nonresident pupils attending the center program.

Sec. 20f. (1) From the funds appropriated in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $18,000,000.00 for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for payments to eligible districts under this section.

(2) The funding under this subsection is from the allocation under subsection (1). A district is eligible for funding under this subsection if the district received a payment under this section as it was in effect for 2013‑2014. A district was eligible for funding in 2013‑2014 if the sum of the following was less than $5.00:

(a) The increase in the district’s foundation allowance or per‑pupil payment as calculated under section 20 from 2012‑2013 to 2013‑2014.

(b) The district’s equity payment per membership pupil under former section 22c for 2013‑2014.

(c) The quotient of the district’s allocation under section 147a for 2012‑2013 divided by the district’s membership pupils for 2012‑2013 minus the quotient of the district’s allocation under section 147a for 2013‑2014 divided by the district’s membership pupils for 2013‑2014.

(3) The amount allocated to each eligible district under subsection (2) is an amount per membership pupil equal to the amount per membership pupil the district received under this section in 2013‑2014.

(4) The funding under this subsection is from the allocation under subsection (1). A district is eligible for funding under this subsection if the sum of the following is less than $25.00:

(a) The increase in the district’s foundation allowance or per‑pupil payment as calculated under section 20 from 2014‑2015 to 2015‑2016.

(b) The decrease in the district’s best practices per‑pupil funding under former section 22f from 2014‑2015 to 2015‑2016.

(c) The decrease in the district’s pupil performance per‑pupil funding under former section 22j from 2014‑2015 to 2015‑2016.

(d) The quotient of the district’s allocation under section 31a for 2015‑2016 divided by the district’s membership pupils for 2015‑2016 minus the quotient of the district’s allocation under section 31a for 2014‑2015 divided by the district’s membership pupils for 2014‑2015.

(5) The amount allocated to each eligible district under subsection (4) is an amount per membership pupil equal to $25.00 minus the sum of the following:

(a) The increase in the district’s foundation allowance or per‑pupil payment as calculated under section 20 from 2014‑2015 to 2015‑2016.

(b) The decrease in the district’s best practices per‑pupil funding under former section 22f from 2014‑2015 to 2015‑2016.

(c) The decrease in the district’s pupil performance per‑pupil funding under former section 22j from 2014‑2015 to 2015‑2016.

(d) The quotient of the district’s allocation under section 31a for 2015‑2016 divided by the district’s membership pupils for 2015‑2016 minus the quotient of the district’s allocation under section 31a for 2014‑2015 divided by the district’s membership pupils for 2014‑2015.

(6) If the allocation under subsection (1) is insufficient to fully fund payments under subsections (3) and (5) as otherwise calculated under this section, the department shall prorate payments under this section on an equal per‑pupil basis.

Sec. 21f. (1) A primary district shall enroll an eligible pupil in virtual courses in accordance with the provisions of this section. A primary district shall not offer a virtual course to an eligible pupil unless the virtual course is published in the primary district’s catalog of board‑approved courses or in the statewide catalog of virtual courses maintained by the Michigan Virtual University pursuant to section 98. The primary district shall also provide on its publicly accessible website a link to the statewide catalog of virtual courses maintained by the Michigan Virtual University. Unless the pupil is at least age 18 or is an emancipated minor, a pupil shall not be enrolled in a virtual course without the consent of the pupil’s parent or legal guardian.

(2) Subject to subsection (3), a primary district shall enroll an eligible pupil in up to 2 virtual courses as requested by the pupil during an academic term, semester, or trimester.

(3) A pupil may be enrolled in more than 2 virtual courses in a specific academic term, semester, or trimester if all of the following conditions are met:

(a) The primary district has determined that it is in the best interest of the pupil.

(b) The pupil agrees with the recommendation of the primary district.

(c) The primary district, in collaboration with the pupil, has developed an education development plan, in a form and manner specified by the department, that is kept on file by the district. Beginning October 1, 2016, this subdivision does not apply to a pupil enrolled as a part‑time pupil under section 166b.

(4) If the number of applicants eligible for acceptance in a virtual course does not exceed the capacity of the provider to provide the virtual course, the provider shall accept for enrollment all of the applicants eligible for acceptance. If the number of applicants exceeds the provider’s capacity to provide the virtual course, the provider shall use a random draw system, subject to the need to abide by state and federal antidiscrimination laws and court orders. A primary district that is also a provider shall determine whether or not it has the capacity to accept applications for enrollment from nonresident applicants in virtual courses and may use that limit as the reason for refusal to enroll a nonresident applicant.

(5) A primary district may not establish additional requirements beyond those specified in this subsection that would prohibit a pupil from taking a virtual course. A pupil’s primary district may deny the pupil enrollment in an online course if any of the following apply, as determined by the district:

(a) The pupil is enrolled in any of grades K to 5.

(b) The pupil has previously gained the credits that would be provided from the completion of the virtual course.

(c) The virtual course is not capable of generating academic credit.

(d) The virtual course is inconsistent with the remaining graduation requirements or career interests of the pupil.

(e) The pupil has not completed the prerequisite coursework for the requested virtual course or has not demonstrated proficiency in the prerequisite course content.

(f) The pupil has failed a previous virtual course in the same subject during the 2 most recent academic years.

(g) The virtual course is of insufficient quality or rigor. A primary district that denies a pupil enrollment request for this reason shall enroll the pupil in a virtual course in the same or a similar subject that the primary district determines is of acceptable rigor and quality.

(h) The cost of the virtual course exceeds the amount identified in subsection (9), (10), unless the pupil or the pupil’s parent or legal guardian agrees to pay the cost that exceeds this amount.

(i) The request for a virtual course enrollment did not occur within the same timelines established by the primary district for enrollment and schedule changes for regular courses.

(j) The request for a virtual course enrollment was not made in the academic term, semester, trimester, or summer preceding the enrollment. This subdivision does not apply to a request made by a pupil who is newly enrolled in the primary district.

(6) If a pupil is denied enrollment in a virtual course by the pupil’s primary district, the primary district shall provide written notification to the pupil of the denial, the reason or reasons for the denial pursuant to subsection (5), and a description of the appeal process. The pupil may appeal the denial by submitting a letter to the superintendent of the intermediate district in which the pupil’s primary district is located. The letter of appeal shall include the reason provided by the primary district for not enrolling the pupil and the reason why the pupil is claiming that the enrollment should be approved. The intermediate district superintendent or designee shall respond to the appeal within 5 days after it is received. If the intermediate district superintendent or designee determines that the denial of enrollment does not meet 1 or more of the reasons specified in subsection (5), the primary district shall enroll the pupil in the virtual course.

(7) To provide a virtual course to an eligible pupil under this section, a provider shall do all of the following:

(a) Ensure that the virtual course has been published in the pupil’s primary district’s catalog of board‑approved courses or published in the statewide catalog of virtual courses maintained by the Michigan Virtual University.

(b) Assign to each pupil a teacher of record and provide the primary district with the personnel identification code assigned by the center for the teacher of record. If the provider is a community college, the virtual course must be taught by an instructor employed by or contracted through the providing community college.

(c) Offer the virtual course on an open entry and exit method, or aligned to a semester, trimester, or accelerated academic term format.

(d) If the virtual course is offered to eligible pupils in more than 1 district, the following additional requirements must also be met:

(i) Provide the Michigan Virtual University with a course syllabus that meets the definition under subsection (14)(g) in a form and manner prescribed by the Michigan Virtual University for inclusion in a statewide catalog of virtual courses.

(ii) Not later than October 1 of each fiscal year, provide the Michigan Virtual University with an aggregated count of enrollments for each virtual course the provider delivered to pupils pursuant to this section during the immediately preceding school year, and the number of enrollments in which the pupil earned 60% or more of the total course points for each virtual course.

(8) To provide an online course under this section, a community college shall ensure that each online course it provides under this section generates postsecondary credit.

(9) For any virtual course a pupil enrolls in under this section, the pupil’s primary district must assign to the pupil a mentor and shall supply the provider with the mentor’s contact information.

(10) For a pupil enrolled in 1 or more virtual courses, the primary district shall use foundation allowance or per‑pupil funds calculated under section 20 to pay for the expenses associated with the virtual course or courses. A primary district is not required to pay toward the cost of a virtual course an amount that exceeds 6.67% of the minimum foundation allowance for the current fiscal year as calculated under section 20.

(11) A virtual learning pupil shall have the same rights and access to technology in his or her primary district’s school facilities as all other pupils enrolled in the pupil’s primary district. The department shall establish standards for hardware, software, and Internet INTERNET access for pupils who are enrolled in more than 2 virtual courses in an academic term, semester, or trimester taken at a location other than a school facility.

(12) If a pupil successfully completes a virtual course, as determined by the pupil’s primary district, the pupil’s primary district shall grant appropriate academic credit for completion of the course and shall count that credit toward completion of graduation and subject area requirements. A pupil’s school record and transcript shall identify the virtual course title as it appears in the virtual course syllabus.

(13) The enrollment of a pupil in 1 or more virtual courses shall not result in a pupil being counted as more than 1.0 full‑time equivalent pupils under this article. The minimum requirements to count the pupil in membership are those established by the pupil accounting manual as it was in effect for the 2015‑2016 school year or as subsequently amended by the department if the department notifies the legislature about the proposed amendment at least 60 days before the amendment becomes effective.

(14) As used in this section:

(a) “Instructor” means an individual who is employed by or contracted through a community college.

(b) “Mentor” means a professional employee of the primary district who monitors the pupil’s progress, ensures the pupil has access to needed technology, is available for assistance, and ensures access to the teacher of record. A mentor may also serve as the teacher of record if the primary district is the provider for the virtual course and the mentor meets the requirements under subdivision (e).

(c) “Primary district” means the district that enrolls the pupil and reports the pupil for pupil membership purposes.

(d) “Provider” means the district, intermediate district, or community college that the primary district pays to provide the virtual course or the Michigan Virtual University if it is providing the virtual course.

(e) “Teacher of record” means a teacher who meets all of the following:

(i) Holds a valid Michigan teaching certificate or a teaching permit recognized by the department.

(ii) If applicable, is endorsed in the subject area and grade of the virtual course.

(iii) Is responsible for providing instruction, determining instructional methods for each pupil, diagnosing learning needs, assessing pupil learning, prescribing intervention strategies and modifying lessons, reporting outcomes, and evaluating the effects of instruction and support strategies.

(iv) Has a personnel identification code provided by the center.

(v) If the provider is a community college, is an instructor employed by or contracted through the providing community college.

(f) “Virtual course” means a course of study that is capable of generating a credit or a grade and that is provided in an interactive learning environment where the majority of the curriculum is delivered using the Internet INTERNET and in which pupils may be separated from their instructor or teacher of record by time or location, or both.

(g) “Virtual course syllabus” means a document that includes all of the following:

(i) An alignment document detailing how the course meets applicable state standards or, if the state does not have state standards, nationally recognized standards.

(ii) The virtual course content outline.

(iii) The virtual course required assessments.

(iv) The virtual course prerequisites.

(v) Expectations for actual instructor or teacher of record contact time with the virtual learning pupil and other communications between a pupil and the instructor or teacher of record.

(vi) Academic support available to the virtual learning pupil.

(vii) The virtual course learning outcomes and objectives.

(viii) The name of the institution or organization providing the virtual content.

(ix) The name of the institution or organization providing the instructor or teacher of record.

(x) The course titles assigned by the provider and the course titles and course codes from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) school codes for the exchange of data (SCED).

(xi) The number of eligible pupils that will be accepted by the provider in the virtual course. A primary district that is also the provider may limit the enrollment to those pupils enrolled in the primary district.

(xii) The results of the virtual course quality review using the guidelines and model review process published by the Michigan Virtual University.

(h) “Virtual learning pupil” means a pupil enrolled in 1 or more virtual courses.

Sec. 21h. (1) From the appropriation in section 11, there is allocated $6,000,000.00 $7,000,000.00 for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for assisting districts assigned by the superintendent to participate in a partnership to improve student achievement. The purpose of the partnership is to identify district needs, develop intervention plans, and partner with public, private, and nonprofit organizations to coordinate resources and improve student achievement. Assignment of a district to a partnership is at the sole discretion of the superintendent.

(2) A district assigned to a partnership by the superintendent is eligible for funding under this section if the district includes at least 1 school that has been rated with a grade of “F”, or comparable performance rating, in the most recent state accountability system rating, that is not under the supervision of the state school reform/redesign office, and that does all of the following:

(a) Completes a comprehensive needs evaluation in collaboration with an intermediate school district, community members, education organizations, and postsecondary institutions, as applicable and approved by the superintendent, within 90 days of assignment to the partnership described in this section. The comprehensive needs evaluation shall include at least all of the following:

(i) A review of the district’s implementation and utilization of a multi‑tiered system of supports to ensure that it is used to appropriately inform instruction.

(ii) A review of the district and school building leadership and educator capacity to substantially improve student outcomes.

(iii) A review of classroom, instructional, and operational practices and curriculum to ensure alignment with research‑based instructional practices and state curriculum standards.

(b) Develops an intervention plan that has been approved by the superintendent and that addresses the needs identified in the comprehensive needs evaluation completed under subdivision (a). The intervention plan shall include at least all of the following:

(i) Specific actions that will be taken by the district and each of its partners to improve student achievement.

(ii) Specific measurable benchmarks that will be met within 18 months to improve student achievement and identification of expected student achievement outcomes to be attained within 3 years after assignment to the partnership.

(C) CRAFTS ACADEMIC GOALS THAT PUT PUPILS ON TRACK TO MEET OR EXCEED GRADE LEVEL PROFICIENCY.

(3) Upon approval of the intervention plan developed under subsection (2), the department shall assign a team of individuals with expertise in comprehensive school and district reform to partner with the district, the intermediate district, community organizations, education organizations, and postsecondary institutions identified in the intervention plan to review the district’s use of existing financial resources to ensure that those resources are being used as efficiently and effectively as possible to improve student academic achievement. THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION MAY WAIVE BURDENSOME ADMINISTRATIVE RULES FOR A PARTNERSHIP DISTRICT FOR THE DURATION OF THE PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT.

(4) Funds allocated under this section may be used to pay for district expenditures approved by the superintendent to improve student achievement. Funds may be used for professional development for teachers or district or school leadership, increased instructional time, teacher mentors, or other expenditures that directly impact student achievement and cannot be paid from existing district financial resources. An eligible district shall not receive funds under this section for more than 3 years. Notwithstanding section 17b, payments to eligible districts under this section shall be paid on a schedule determined by the department.

(5) The department shall annually report IN PERSON to the legislature on the activities funded under this section and how those activities impacted student achievement in eligible districts that received funds under this section. TO THE EXTENT POSSIBLE, PARTICIPATING DISTRICTS RECEIVING FUNDING UNDER THIS SECTION SHALL PARTICIPATE IN THE REPORT.

Sec. 22a. (1) From the appropriation in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $5,207,000,000.00 for 2016‑2017 and there is allocated an amount not to exceed $5,181,800,000.00 $5,176,000,000.00 for 2017‑2018 AND THERE IS ALLOCATED AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $5,107,000,000.00 FOR 2018‑2019 for payments to districts and qualifying public school academies to guarantee each district and qualifying public school academy an amount equal to its 1994‑95 total state and local per pupil revenue for school operating purposes under section 11 of article IX of the state constitution of 1963. Pursuant to section 11 of article IX of the state constitution of 1963, this guarantee does not apply to a district in a year in which the district levies a millage rate for school district operating purposes less than it levied in 1994. However, subsection (2) applies to calculating the payments under this section. Funds allocated under this section that are not expended in the state fiscal year for which they were allocated, as determined by the department, may be used to supplement the allocations under sections 22b and 51c in order to fully fund those calculated allocations for the same fiscal year.

(2) To ensure that a district receives an amount equal to the district’s 1994‑95 total state and local per pupil revenue for school operating purposes, there is allocated to each district a state portion of the district’s 1994‑95 foundation allowance in an amount calculated as follows:

(a) Except as otherwise provided in this subsection, the state portion of a district’s 1994‑95 foundation allowance is an amount equal to the district’s 1994‑95 foundation allowance or $6,500.00, whichever is less, minus the difference between the sum of the product of the taxable value per membership pupil of all property in the district that is nonexempt property times the district’s certified mills and, for a district with certified mills exceeding 12, the product of the taxable value per membership pupil of property in the district that is commercial personal property times the certified mills minus 12 mills and the quotient of the ad valorem property tax revenue of the district captured under tax increment financing acts divided by the district’s membership. For a district that has a millage reduction required under section 31 of article IX of the state constitution of 1963, the state portion of the district’s foundation allowance shall be calculated as if that reduction did not occur. For a receiving district, if school operating taxes are to be levied on behalf of a dissolved district that has been attached in whole or in part to the receiving district to satisfy debt obligations of the dissolved district under section 12 of the revised school code, MCL 380.12, taxable value per membership pupil of all property in the receiving district that is nonexempt property and taxable value per membership pupil of property in the receiving district that is commercial personal property do not include property within the geographic area of the dissolved district; ad valorem property tax revenue of the receiving district captured under tax increment financing acts does not include ad valorem property tax revenue captured within the geographic boundaries of the dissolved district under tax increment financing acts; and certified mills do not include the certified mills of the dissolved district. For a community district, the allocation as otherwise calculated under this section shall be reduced by an amount equal to the amount of local school operating tax revenue that would otherwise be due to the community district if not for the operation of section 386 of the revised school code, MCL 380.386, and the amount of this reduction shall be offset by the increase in funding under section 22b(2).

(b) For a district that had a 1994‑95 foundation allowance greater than $6,500.00, the state payment under this subsection shall be the sum of the amount calculated under subdivision (a) plus the amount calculated under this subdivision. The amount calculated under this subdivision shall be equal to the difference between the district’s 1994‑95 foundation allowance minus $6,500.00 and the current year hold harmless school operating taxes per pupil. If the result of the calculation under subdivision (a) is negative, the negative amount shall be an offset against any state payment calculated under this subdivision. If the result of a calculation under this subdivision is negative, there shall not be a state payment or a deduction under this subdivision. The taxable values per membership pupil used in the calculations under this subdivision are as adjusted by ad valorem property tax revenue captured under tax increment financing acts divided by the district’s membership. For a receiving district, if school operating taxes are to be levied on behalf of a dissolved district that has been attached in whole or in part to the receiving district to satisfy debt obligations of the dissolved district under section 12 of the revised school code, MCL 380.12, ad valorem property tax revenue captured under tax increment financing acts do not include ad valorem property tax revenue captured within the geographic boundaries of the dissolved district under tax increment financing acts.

(3) Beginning in 2003‑2004, for pupils in membership in a qualifying public school academy, there is allocated under this section to the authorizing body that is the fiscal agent for the qualifying public school academy for forwarding to the qualifying public school academy an amount equal to the 1994‑95 per pupil payment to the qualifying public school academy under section 20.

(4) A district or qualifying public school academy may use funds allocated under this section in conjunction with any federal funds for which the district or qualifying public school academy otherwise would be eligible.

(5) Except as otherwise provided in this subsection, for a district that is formed or reconfigured after June 1, 2000 by consolidation of 2 or more districts or by annexation, the resulting district’s 1994‑95 foundation allowance under this section beginning after the effective date of the consolidation or annexation shall be the average of the 1994‑95 foundation allowances of each of the original or affected districts, calculated as provided in this section, weighted as to the percentage of pupils in total membership in the resulting district in the state fiscal year in which the consolidation takes place who reside in the geographic area of each of the original districts. If an affected district’s 1994‑95 foundation allowance is less than the 1994‑95 basic foundation allowance, the amount of that district’s 1994‑95 foundation allowance shall be considered for the purpose of calculations under this subsection to be equal to the amount of the 1994‑95 basic foundation allowance. This subsection does not apply to a receiving district unless there is a subsequent consolidation or annexation that affects the district.

(6) Payments under this section are subject to section 25g.

(7) As used in this section:

(a) “1994‑95 foundation allowance” means a district’s 1994‑95 foundation allowance calculated and certified by the department of treasury or the superintendent under former section 20a as enacted in 1993 PA 336 and as amended by 1994 PA 283.

(b) “Certified mills” means the lesser of 18 mills or the number of mills of school operating taxes levied by the district in 1993‑94.

(c) “Current state fiscal year” means the state fiscal year for which a particular calculation is made.

(d) “Current year hold harmless school operating taxes per pupil” means the per pupil revenue generated by multiplying a district’s 1994‑95 hold harmless millage by the district’s current year taxable value per membership pupil. For a receiving district, if school operating taxes are to be levied on behalf of a dissolved district that has been attached in whole or in part to the receiving district to satisfy debt obligations of the dissolved district under section 12 of the revised school code, MCL 380.12, taxable value per membership pupil does not include the taxable value of property within the geographic area of the dissolved district.

(e) “Dissolved district” means a district that loses its organization, has its territory attached to 1 or more other districts, and is dissolved as provided under section 12 of the revised school code, MCL 380.12.

(f) “Hold harmless millage” means, for a district with a 1994‑95 foundation allowance greater than $6,500.00, the number of mills by which the exemption from the levy of school operating taxes on a homestead, qualified agricultural property, qualified forest property, supportive housing property, industrial personal property, commercial personal property, and property occupied by a public school academy could be reduced as provided in section 1211 of the revised school code, MCL 380.1211, and the number of mills of school operating taxes that could be levied on all property as provided in section 1211(2) of the revised school code, MCL 380.1211, as certified by the department of treasury for the 1994 tax year. For a receiving district, if school operating taxes are to be levied on behalf of a dissolved district that has been attached in whole or in part to the receiving district to satisfy debt obligations of the dissolved district under section 12 of the revised school code, MCL 380.12, school operating taxes do not include school operating taxes levied within the geographic area of the dissolved district.

(g) “Homestead”, “qualified agricultural property”, “qualified forest property”, “supportive housing property”, “industrial personal property”, and “commercial personal property” mean those terms as defined in section 1211 of the revised school code, MCL 380.1211.

(h) “Membership” means the definition of that term under section 6 as in effect for the particular fiscal year for which a particular calculation is made.

(i) “Nonexempt property” means property that is not a principal residence, qualified agricultural property, qualified forest property, supportive housing property, industrial personal property, commercial personal property, or property occupied by a public school academy.

(j) “Qualifying public school academy” means a public school academy that was in operation in the 1994‑95 school year and is in operation in the current state fiscal year.

(k) “Receiving district” means a district to which all or part of the territory of a dissolved district is attached under section 12 of the revised school code, MCL 380.12.

(l) “School operating taxes” means local ad valorem property taxes levied under section 1211 of the revised school code, MCL 380.1211, and retained for school operating purposes as defined in section 20.

(m) “Tax increment financing acts” means 1975 PA 197, MCL 125.1651 to 125.1681, the tax increment finance authority act, 1980 PA 450, MCL 125.1801 to 125.1830, the local development financing act, 1986 PA 281, MCL 125.2151 to 125.2174, the brownfield redevelopment financing act, 1996 PA 381, MCL 125.2651 to 125.2672, or the corridor improvement authority act, 2005 PA 280, MCL 125.2871 to 125.2899.

(n) “Taxable value per membership pupil” means each of the following divided by the district’s membership:

(i) For the number of mills by which the exemption from the levy of school operating taxes on a homestead, qualified agricultural property, qualified forest property, supportive housing property, industrial personal property, commercial personal property, and property occupied by a public school academy may be reduced as provided in section 1211 of the revised school code, MCL 380.1211, the taxable value of homestead, qualified agricultural property, qualified forest property, supportive housing property, industrial personal property, commercial personal property, and property occupied by a public school academy for the calendar year ending in the current state fiscal year. For a receiving district, if school operating taxes are to be levied on behalf of a dissolved district that has been attached in whole or in part to the receiving district to satisfy debt obligations of the dissolved district under section 12 of the revised school code, MCL 380.12, mills do not include mills within the geographic area of the dissolved district.

(ii) For the number of mills of school operating taxes that may be levied on all property as provided in section 1211(2) of the revised school code, MCL 380.1211, the taxable value of all property for the calendar year ending in the current state fiscal year. For a receiving district, if school operating taxes are to be levied on behalf of a dissolved district that has been attached in whole or in part to the receiving district to satisfy debt obligations of the dissolved district under section 12 of the revised school code, MCL 380.12, school operating taxes do not include school operating taxes levied within the geographic area of the dissolved district.

Sec. 22b. (1) For discretionary nonmandated payments to districts under this section, there is allocated for 2016‑2017 an amount not to exceed $3,841,000,000.00 from the state school aid fund and general fund appropriations in section 11 and an amount not to exceed $72,000,000.00 from the community district education trust fund appropriation in section 11, and there is allocated for 2017‑2018 an amount not to exceed $3,965,500,000.00 $3,957,000,000.00 from the state school aid fund and general fund appropriations in section 11 and an amount not to exceed $72,000,000.00 from the community district education trust fund appropriation in section 11, AND THERE IS ALLOCATED FOR 2018‑2019 AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $4,252,000,000.00 FROM THE STATE SCHOOL AID FUND AND GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATIONS IN SECTION 11 AND AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $72,000,000.00 FROM THE COMMUNITY DISTRICT EDUCATION TRUST FUND APPROPRIATION IN SECTION 11. Except for money allocated from the community district trust fund, money allocated under this section that is not expended in the state fiscal year for which it was allocated, as determined by the department, may be used to supplement the allocations under sections 22a and 51c in order to fully fund those calculated allocations for the same fiscal year.

(2) Subject to subsection (3) and section 296, the allocation to a district under this section shall be an amount equal to the sum of the amounts calculated under sections 20, 20m, 51a(2), 51a(3), and 51a(11), minus the sum of the allocations to the district under sections 22a and 51c. For a community district, the allocation as otherwise calculated under this section shall be increased by an amount equal to the amount of local school operating tax revenue that would otherwise be due to the community district if not for the operation of section 386 of the revised school code, MCL 380.386, and this increase shall be paid from the community district education trust fund allocation in subsection (1) in order to offset the absence of local school operating revenue in a community district in the funding of the state portion of the foundation allowance under section 20(4).

(3) In order to receive an allocation under subsection (1), each district shall do all of the following:

(a) Comply with section 1280b of the revised school code, MCL 380.1280b.

(b) Comply with sections 1278a and 1278b of the revised school code, MCL 380.1278a and 380.1278b.

(c) Furnish data and other information required by state and federal law to the center and the department in the form and manner specified by the center or the department, as applicable.

(d) Comply with section 1230g of the revised school code, MCL 380.1230g.

(e) Comply with section 21f.

(F) FOR A DISTRICT OR PUBLIC SCHOOL ACADEMY THAT HAS ENTERED INTO A PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT WITH THE DEPARTMENT, COMPLY WITH SECTION 22P.

(4) Districts are encouraged to use funds allocated under this section for the purchase and support of payroll, human resources, and other business function software that is compatible with that of the intermediate district in which the district is located and with other districts located within that intermediate district.

(5) From the allocation in subsection (1), the department shall pay up to $1,000,000.00 in litigation costs incurred by this state related to commercial or industrial property tax appeals, including, but not limited to, appeals of classification, that impact revenues dedicated to the state school aid fund.

(6) From the allocation in subsection (1), the department shall pay up to $1,000,000.00 in litigation costs incurred by this state associated with lawsuits filed by 1 or more districts or intermediate districts against this state. If the allocation under this section is insufficient to fully fund all payments required under this section, the payments under this subsection shall be made in full before any proration of remaining payments under this section.

(7) It is the intent of the legislature that all constitutional obligations of this state have been fully funded under sections 22a, 31d, 51a, 51c, and 152a. If a claim is made by an entity receiving funds under this article that challenges the legislative determination of the adequacy of this funding or alleges that there exists an unfunded constitutional requirement, the state budget director may escrow or allocate from the discretionary funds for nonmandated payments under this section the amount as may be necessary to satisfy the claim before making any payments to districts under subsection (2). If funds are escrowed, the escrowed funds are a work project appropriation and the funds are carried forward into the following fiscal year. The purpose of the work project is to provide for any payments that may be awarded to districts as a result of litigation. The work project shall be completed upon resolution of the litigation.

(8) If the local claims review board or a court of competent jurisdiction makes a final determination that this state is in violation of section 29 of article IX of the state constitution of 1963 regarding state payments to districts, the state budget director shall use work project funds under subsection (7) or allocate from the discretionary funds for nonmandated payments under this section the amount as may be necessary to satisfy the amount owed to districts before making any payments to districts under subsection (2).

(9) If a claim is made in court that challenges the legislative determination of the adequacy of funding for this state’s constitutional obligations or alleges that there exists an unfunded constitutional requirement, any interested party may seek an expedited review of the claim by the local claims review board. If the claim exceeds $10,000,000.00, this state may remove the action to the court of appeals, and the court of appeals shall have and shall exercise jurisdiction over the claim.

(10) If payments resulting from a final determination by the local claims review board or a court of competent jurisdiction that there has been a violation of section 29 of article IX of the state constitution of 1963 exceed the amount allocated for discretionary nonmandated payments under this section, the legislature shall provide for adequate funding for this state’s constitutional obligations at its next legislative session.

(11) If a lawsuit challenging payments made to districts related to costs reimbursed by federal title XIX Medicaid funds is filed against this state, then, for the purpose of addressing potential liability under such a lawsuit, the state budget director may place funds allocated under this section in escrow or allocate money from the funds otherwise allocated under this section, up to a maximum of 50% of the amount allocated in subsection (1). If funds are placed in escrow under this subsection, those funds are a work project appropriation and the funds are carried forward into the following fiscal year. The purpose of the work project is to provide for any payments that may be awarded to districts as a result of the litigation. The work project shall be completed upon resolution of the litigation. In addition, this state reserves the right to terminate future federal title XIX Medicaid reimbursement payments to districts if the amount or allocation of reimbursed funds is challenged in the lawsuit. As used in this subsection, “title XIX” means title XIX of the social security act, 42 USC 1396 to 1396v.1396W‑5.

Sec. 22d. (1) From the appropriation in section 11, an amount not to exceed $5,000,000.00 $6,000,000.00 is allocated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for supplemental payments to rural districts under this section.

(2) From the allocation under subsection (1), there is allocated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 an amount not to exceed $957,300.00 for payments under this subsection to districts that meet all of the following:

(a) Operates grades K to 12.

(b) Has fewer than 250 pupils in membership.

(c) Each school building operated by the district meets at least 1 of the following:

(i) Is located in the Upper Peninsula at least 30 miles from any other public school building.

(ii) Is located on an island that is not accessible by bridge.

(3) The amount of the additional funding to each eligible district under subsection (2) shall be determined under a spending plan developed as provided in this subsection and approved by the superintendent of public instruction. The spending plan shall be developed cooperatively by the intermediate superintendents of each intermediate district in which an eligible district is located. The intermediate superintendents shall review the financial situation of each eligible district, determine the minimum essential financial needs of each eligible district, and develop and agree on a spending plan that distributes the available funding under subsection (2) to the eligible districts based on those financial needs. The intermediate superintendents shall submit the spending plan to the superintendent of public instruction for approval. Upon approval by the superintendent of public instruction, the amounts specified for each eligible district under the spending plan are allocated under subsection (2) and shall be paid to the eligible districts in the same manner as payments under section 22b.

(4) Subject to subsection (6), from the allocation in subsection (1), there is allocated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 an amount not to exceed $4,042,700.00 $5,042,700.00 for payments under this subsection to districts that have 7.3 7.7 or fewer pupils per square mile as determined by the department.

(5) The funds allocated under subsection (4) shall be allocated on an equal per‑pupil basis.

(6) A district receiving funds allocated under subsection (2) is not eligible for funding allocated under subsection (4).

Sec. 22g. (1) From the funds appropriated in section 11, there is allocated for 2016‑2017 2017‑2018 only an amount not to exceed $500,000.00 $2,800,000.00 for competitive assistance grants to districts and intermediate districts.THAT WERE AWARDED FUNDS UNDER THIS SECTION IN 2016‑2017 BUT DID NOT RECEIVE THOSE FUNDS.

(2) Funds received under this section may be used for reimbursement of transition costs associated with the dissolution, consolidation, or annexation of districts. or intermediate districts. Grant funding shall be available for dissolutions, consolidations, or annexations that occur on or after June 1, 2016. Districts may spend funds allocated under this section over 3 fiscal years.

(3) In addition to the amount allocated under subsection (1), from the funds appropriated in section 11, there is allocated for 2016‑2017 an amount not to exceed $2,500,000.00 for grants to districts or intermediate districts that received a grant under this section as it was in effect for 20152016 for reimbursement of remaining transition costs associated with a dissolution, consolidation, or annexation that was approved during 2015‑2016 by the school electors of the applicable district or intermediate district.

(4) Notwithstanding section 17b, grant payments under this section shall be paid on a schedule determined by the department.

Sec. 22m. (1) From the appropriations in section 11, there is allocated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 an amount not to exceed $2,200,000.00 for supporting the integration of local data systems into the Michigan data hub network based on common standards and applications that are in compliance with section 19(6).

(2) An entity that is the fiscal agent for no more than 5 consortia of intermediate districts that previously received funding from the technology readiness infrastructure grant under former section 22i for the purpose of establishing regional data hubs that are part of the Michigan data hub network is eligible for funding under this section.

(3) The center shall work with an advisory committee composed of representatives from intermediate districts within each of the data hub regions to coordinate the activities of the Michigan data hub network.

(4) The center, in collaboration with the Michigan data hub network, shall determine the amount of funds distributed under this section to each participating regional data hub within the network, based upon a competitive grant process. Entities receiving funding under this section shall represent geographically diverse areas in this state.

(5) Notwithstanding section 17b, payments under this section shall be made on a schedule determined by the center.

(6) To receive funding under this section, a regional data hub must have a governance model that ensures local control of data, data security, and student privacy issues. The integration of data within each of the regional data hubs shall provide for the actionable use of data by districts and intermediate districts through common reports and dashboards and for efficiently providing information to meet state and federal reporting purposes.

(7) Participation in a data hub region in the Michigan data hub network under this section is voluntary and is not required.

(8) Entities receiving funding under this section shall use the funds for all of the following:

(a) Creating an infrastructure that effectively manages the movement of data between data systems used by intermediate districts, districts, and other educational organizations in Michigan based on common data standards to improve student achievement.

(b) Utilizing the infrastructure to put in place commonly needed integrations, reducing cost and effort to do that work while increasing data accuracy and usability.

(c) Promoting the use of a more common set of applications by promoting systems that integrate with the Michigan data hub network.

(d) Promoting 100% district adoption of the Michigan data hub network by September 30, 2018.2020.

(e) Ensuring local control of data, data security, and student data privacy.

(f) Utilizing the infrastructure to promote the actionable use of data through common reports and dashboards that are consistent statewide.

(g) Creating a governance model to facilitate sustainable operations of the infrastructure in the future, including administration, legal agreements, documentation, staffing, hosting, and funding.

(h) Evaluating future data initiatives at all levels to determine whether the initiatives can be enhanced by using the standardized environment in the Michigan data hub network.

(9) Not later than January 1 , 2018, OF EACH FISCAL YEAR, the center shall prepare a summary report of information provided by each entity that received funds under this section that includes measurable outcomes based on the objectives described under this section. The report shall include a summary of compiled data from each entity to provide a means to evaluate the effectiveness of the project. The center shall submit the report to the house and senate appropriations subcommittees on state school aid and to the house and senate fiscal agencies.

Sec. 22n. (1) From the appropriation in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $11,000,000.00 for 2017 2018 2018‑2019 for additional payments to districts for the higher instructional costs of educating high school pupils.

(2) A district is eligible for a payment under this section if it educates pupils in 1 or more of grades 9 to 12.

(3) The payment to each eligible district under this section shall be an amount equal to $25.00 multiplied by the district’s total pupil membership in grades 9 to 12 as calculated under section 6 for the current fiscal year. If the allocation under subsection (1) is insufficient to fully fund payments under this subsection, the department shall prorate payments under this section on an equal per‑pupil basis.

SEC. 22P. IN ORDER TO RECEIVE FUNDING UNDER SECTION 22B, A DISTRICT OR PUBLIC SCHOOL ACADEMY THAT HAS A SIGNED PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT WITH THE DEPARTMENT MUST MEET BOTH OF THE FOLLOWING:

(A) AMENDS THE PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT TO INCLUDE MEASURABLE ACADEMIC OUTCOMES THAT WILL BE ACHIEVED AFTER 18 MONTHS AND AFTER 36 MONTHS FROM THE DATE THE AGREEMENT WAS ORIGINALLY SIGNED. MEASURABLE ACADEMIC OUTCOMES UNDER THIS SUBDIVISION MUST INCLUDE OUTCOMES THAT PUT PUPILS ON TRACK TO MEET OR EXCEED GRADE LEVEL PROFICIENCY.

(B) AMENDS THE PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT TO INCLUDE ACCOUNTABILITY MEASURES TO BE IMPOSED IF THE DISTRICT OR PUBLIC SCHOOL ACADEMY DOES NOT ACHIEVE THE MEASURABLE ACADEMIC OUTCOMES UNDER SUBDIVISION (A) FOR A SCHOOL SUBJECT TO A PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT. ACCOUNTABILITY MEASURES UNDER THIS SUBDIVISION MAY INCLUDE EITHER THE CLOSURE OF THE SCHOOL AT THE END OF THE CURRENT SCHOOL YEAR OR THE RECONSTITUTION OF THE SCHOOL IN A FINAL ATTEMPT TO IMPROVE STUDENT EDUCATIONAL PERFORMANCE OR TO AVOID INTERRUPTION OF THE EDUCATIONAL PROCESS. FOR A PUBLIC SCHOOL ACADEMY THAT AMENDS A PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT UNDER THIS SUBDIVISION, THE AMENDED AGREEMENT MUST INCLUDE A REQUIREMENT THAT IF RECONSTITUTION IS IMPOSED ON A SCHOOL THAT IS OPERATED BY THE PUBLIC SCHOOL ACADEMY AND THAT IS SUBJECT TO THE PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT, THE SCHOOL SHALL BE RECONSTITUTED AS DESCRIBED IN SECTION 507 OF THE REVISED SCHOOL CODE, MCL 380.507. FOR A DISTRICT THAT AMENDS A PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT UNDER THIS SUBDIVISION, THE AMENDED AGREEMENT MUST INCLUDE A REQUIREMENT THAT IF RECONSTITUTION IS IMPOSED ON A SCHOOL THAT IS OPERATED BY THE DISTRICT AND THAT IS SUBJECT TO THE PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT, ALL OF THE FOLLOWING APPLY:

(i) THE DISTRICT SHALL MAKE SIGNIFICANT CHANGES TO THE INSTRUCTIONAL AND NONINSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMMING OF THE SCHOOL BASED ON THE NEEDS IDENTIFIED THROUGH A COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW OF DATA.

(ii) THE DISTRICT SHALL REPLACE AT LEAST 25% OF THE FACULTY AND STAFF OF THE SCHOOL.

(iii) THE DISTRICT SHALL REPLACE THE PRINCIPAL OF THE SCHOOL, UNLESS THE CURRENT PRINCIPAL HAS BEEN IN PLACE FOR LESS THAN 3 YEARS AND THE BOARD OF THE DISTRICT DETERMINES THAT IT IS IN THE BEST INTERESTS OF THE DISTRICT TO RETAIN CURRENT SCHOOL LEADERSHIP.

(iv) THE RECONSTITUTION PLAN FOR THE SCHOOL SHALL REQUIRE THE ADOPTION OF GOALS SIMILAR TO THE GOALS INCLUDED IN A PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT, WITH A LIMIT OF 5 YEARS TO ACHIEVE THE GOALS. IF THE GOALS ARE NOT ACHIEVED WITHIN 5 YEARS, THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION SHALL EITHER IMPOSE A SECOND RECONSTITUTION PLAN ON THE SCHOOL OR CLOSE THE SCHOOL.

Sec. 24. (1) From the appropriation in section 11, there is allocated EACH FISCAL YEAR for 2017‑2018 AND FOR 2018‑2019 an amount not to exceed $8,000,000.00 $7,150,000.00 for payments to the educating district or intermediate district for educating pupils assigned by a court or the department of health and human services to reside in or to attend a juvenile detention facility or child caring institution licensed by the department of health and human services and approved by the department to provide an on‑grounds education program. The amount of the payment under this section to a district or intermediate district shall be calculated as prescribed under subsection (2).

(2) The total amount allocated under this section shall be allocated by paying to the educating district or intermediate district an amount equal to the lesser of the district’s or intermediate district’s added cost or the department’s approved per‑pupil allocation for the district or intermediate district. For the purposes of this subsection:

(a) “Added cost” means 100% of the added cost each fiscal year for educating all pupils assigned by a court or the department of health and human services to reside in or to attend a juvenile detention facility or child caring institution licensed by the department of health and human services or the department of licensing and regulatory affairs and approved by the department to provide an on‑grounds education program. Added cost shall be computed by deducting all other revenue received under this article for pupils described in this section from total costs, as approved by the department, in whole or in part, for educating those pupils in the on‑grounds education program or in a program approved by the department that is located on property adjacent to a juvenile detention facility or child caring institution. Costs reimbursed by federal funds are not included.

(b) “Department’s approved per‑pupil allocation” for a district or intermediate district shall be determined by dividing the total amount allocated under this section for a fiscal year by the full‑time equated membership total for all pupils approved by the department to be funded under this section for that fiscal year for the district or intermediate district.

(3) A district or intermediate district educating pupils described in this section at a residential child caring institution may operate, and receive funding under this section for, a department‑approved on‑grounds educational program for those pupils that is longer than 181 days, but not longer than 233 days, if the child caring institution was licensed as a child caring institution and offered in 1991‑92 an on‑grounds educational program that was longer than 181 days but not longer than 233 days and that was operated by a district or intermediate district.

(4) Special education pupils funded under section 53a shall not be funded under this section.

Sec. 24a. From the appropriation in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $1,339,000.00 for 2017‑2018 $1,355,700.00 FOR 2018‑2019 for payments to intermediate districts for pupils who are placed in juvenile justice service facilities operated by the department of health and human services. Each intermediate district shall receive an amount equal to the state share of those costs that are clearly and directly attributable to the educational programs for pupils placed in facilities described in this section that are located within the intermediate district’s boundaries. The intermediate districts receiving payments under this section shall cooperate with the department of health and human services to ensure that all funding allocated under this section is utilized by the intermediate district and department of health and human services for educational programs for pupils described in this section. Pupils described in this section are not eligible to be funded under section 24. However, a program responsibility or other fiscal responsibility associated with these pupils shall not be transferred from the department of health and human services to a district or intermediate district unless the district or intermediate district consents to the transfer.

Sec. 24c. (1) From the appropriation in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $1,528,400.00 for 2017‑2018 FOR 2018‑2019 for payments to districts for pupils who are enrolled in a nationally administered community‑based education and youth mentoring program, known as the youth challenge program, that is administered by the department of military and veterans affairs. Both of the following apply to a district receiving payments under this section:

(a) The district shall contract with the department of military and veterans affairs to ensure that all funding allocated under this section is utilized by the district and the department of military and veterans affairs for the youth challenge program.

(b) The district may retain for its administrative expenses an amount not to exceed 3% of the amount of the payment the district receives under this section.

(2) IN ADDITION TO THE FUNDS ALLOCATED UNDER SUBSECTION (1), FROM THE APPROPRIATION IN SECTION 11, THERE IS ALLOCATED AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $80,000.00 FOR 2018‑2019 TO A DISTRICT FOR PUPILS WHO ENROLLED IN THE YOUTH CHALLENGE PROGRAM BUT DROPPED OUT BEFORE THE PUPIL MEMBERSHIP COUNT DAY. THE DISTRICT SHALL USE THESE FUNDS TO SUPPORT THE YOUTH CHALLENGE PROGRAM.

Sec. 25e. (1) The pupil membership transfer application and pupil transfer process administered by the center under this section shall be used for processing pupil transfers.

(2) If a pupil counted in membership for the pupil membership count day transfers from a district or intermediate district to enroll in another district or intermediate district after the pupil membership count day and before the supplemental count day and, due to the pupil’s enrollment and attendance status as of the pupil membership count day, the pupil was not counted in membership in the educating district or intermediate district, the educating district or intermediate district may report the enrollment and attendance information to the center through the pupil transfer process within 30 days after the transfer or within 30 days after the pupil membership count certification date, whichever is later. Pupil transfers may be submitted no earlier than the first day after the certification deadline for the pupil membership count day and before the supplemental count day. Upon receipt of the transfer information under this subsection indicating that a pupil has enrolled and is in attendance in an educating district or intermediate district as described in this subsection, the pupil transfer process shall do the following:

(a) Notify the district in which the pupil was previously enrolled.

(b) Notify both the pupil auditing staff of the intermediate district in which the educating district is located and the pupil auditing staff of the intermediate district in which the district that previously enrolled the pupil is located. The pupil auditing staff shall investigate a representative sample based on required audit sample sizes in the pupil auditing manual and may deny the pupil membership transfer.

(c) Aggregate the districtwide changes and notify the department for use in adjusting the state aid payment system.

(3) The department shall do all of the following:

(a) Adjust the membership calculation for each district or intermediate district in which the pupil was previously counted in membership or that previously received an adjustment in its membership calculation under this section due to a change in the pupil’s enrollment and attendance so that the district’s or intermediate district’s membership is prorated to allow the district or intermediate district to receive for each school day, as determined by the financial calendar furnished by the center, in which the pupil was enrolled and in attendance in the district or intermediate district an amount equal to 1/105 of a full‑time equated membership claimed in the fall pupil membership count. The district or intermediate district shall receive a prorated foundation allowance in an amount equal to the product of the adjustment under this subdivision for the district or intermediate district multiplied by the foundation allowance or per‑pupil payment as calculated under section 20 for the district or intermediate district. The foundation allowance or per‑pupil payment shall be adjusted by the pupil’s full‑time equated status as affected by the membership definition under section 6(4).

(b) Adjust the membership calculation for the educating district or intermediate district in which the pupil is enrolled and is in attendance so that the district’s or intermediate district’s membership is increased to allow the district or intermediate district to receive an amount equal to the difference between the full‑time equated membership claimed in the fall pupil membership count and the sum of the adjustments calculated under subdivision (a) for each district or intermediate district in which the pupil was previously enrolled and in attendance. The educating district or intermediate district shall receive a prorated foundation allowance in an amount equal to the product of the adjustment under this subdivision for the educating district or intermediate district multiplied by the per‑pupil payment as calculated under section 20 for the educating district or intermediate district. The foundation allowance or per‑pupil payment shall be adjusted by the pupil’s full‑time equated status as affected by the membership definition under section 6(4).

(4) The changes in calculation of state school aid required under subsection (3) shall take effect as of the date that the pupil becomes enrolled and in attendance in the educating district or intermediate district, and the department shall base all subsequent payments under this article for the fiscal year to the affected districts or intermediate districts on this recalculation of state school aid.

(5) If a pupil enrolls in an educating district or intermediate district as described in subsection (2), the district or intermediate district in which the pupil is counted in membership or another educating district or intermediate district that received an adjustment in its membership calculation under subsection (3), if any, and the educating district or intermediate district shall provide to the center and the department all information they require to comply with this section.

(6) The portion of the full‑time equated pupil membership for which a pupil is enrolled in 1 or more online courses under section 21f that is representative of the amount that the primary district paid in course costs to the course provider shall not be counted or transferred under the pupil transfer process under this section.

(7) It is the intent of the legislature that the center determine the number of pupils who did not reside in this state as of the 2018‑2019 pupil membership count day but who newly enrolled in a district or intermediate district after that pupil membership count day and before the 2018‑2019 supplemental count day. It is the intent of the legislature that the center further determine the number of pupils who were counted in membership for the 2018‑2019 pupil membership count day but who left this state before the 2018‑2019 supplemental count day. In 2019‑2020, the center shall provide a report to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on state school aid, and to the senate and house fiscal agencies, detailing the number of pupils transferring in from another state or transferring out from this state OUTSIDE THE PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM OF THIS STATE AND THE NUMBER OF PUPILS TRANSFERRING OUT OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM IN THIS STATE between the pupil membership count day and supplemental count day as described in this subsection. The center shall include in the report a discussion of benefits and obstacles to developing a pupil enrollment process for pupils who newly enroll in a district or intermediate district after the pupil membership count day and before the supplemental count day, and developing a process for deducting pupils who were counted on the pupil membership count day and transfer out of this state before the supplemental count day.

(8) As used in this section:

(a) “Educating district or intermediate district” means the district or intermediate district in which a pupil enrolls after the pupil membership count day or after an adjustment was made in another district’s or intermediate district’s membership calculation under this section due to the pupil’s enrollment and attendance.

(b) “Pupil” means that term as defined under section 6 and also children receiving early childhood special education programs and services.

Sec. 25f. (1) From the state school aid fund money appropriated in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $750,000.00 $1,600,000.00 EACH FISCAL YEAR for 2017‑2018 AND FOR 2018‑2019 for payments to strict discipline academies established under sections 1311b to 1311m of the revised school code, MCL 380.1311b to 380.1311m, as provided under this section.

(2) In order to receive funding under this section, a strict discipline academy shall first comply with section 25e and use the pupil transfer process under that section for changes in enrollment as prescribed under that section.

(3) The total amount allocated to a strict discipline academy under this section is an amount equal to SHALL FIRST BE DISTRIBUTED AS the lesser of the strict discipline academy’s added cost or the department’s approved per‑pupil allocation for the strict discipline academy. ANY FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE FIRST DISTRIBUTION SHALL BE DISTRIBUTED BY PRORATING ON AN EQUAL PER‑PUPIL MEMBERSHIP BASIS, NOT TO EXCEED A STRICT DISCIPLINE ACADEMY’S ADDED COST. However, the sum of the amounts received by a strict discipline academy under this section and under section 24 shall not exceed the product of the strict discipline academy’s per‑pupil allocation calculated under section 20 multiplied by the strict discipline academy’s full‑time equated membership. The department shall allocate funds to strict discipline academies under this section on a monthly basis. For the purposes of this subsection:

(a) “Added cost” means 100% of the added cost each fiscal year for educating all pupils enrolled and in regular daily attendance at a strict discipline academy. Added cost shall be computed by deducting all other revenue received under this article for pupils described in this subsection from total costs, as approved by the department, in whole or in part, for educating those pupils in a strict discipline academy. The department shall include all costs including, but not limited to, educational costs, insurance, management fees, technology costs, legal fees, auditing fees, interest, pupil accounting costs, and any other administrative costs necessary to operate the program or to comply with statutory requirements. Costs reimbursed by federal funds are not included.

(b) “Department’s approved per‑pupil allocation” for a strict discipline academy shall be determined by dividing the total amount allocated under this subsection for a fiscal year by the full‑time equated membership total for all pupils approved by the department to be funded under this subsection for that fiscal year for the strict discipline academy.

(4) Special education pupils funded under section 53a shall not be funded under this section.

(5) If the funds allocated under this section are insufficient to fully fund the adjustments under subsection (3), payments under this section shall be prorated on an equal per‑pupil basis.

(6) Payments to districts under this section shall be made according to the payment schedule under section 17b.

Sec. 25g. (1) From the state school aid fund money appropriated in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $750,000.00 for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for the purposes of this section. If the operation of the special membership counting provisions under section 6(4)(dd) and the other membership counting provisions under section 6(4) result in a pupil being counted as more than 1.0 FTE in a fiscal year, then the payment made for the pupil under sections 22a and 22b shall not be based on more than 1.0 FTE for that pupil, and that portion of the FTE that exceeds 1.0 shall be paid under this section in an amount equal to that portion multiplied by the educating district’s foundation allowance or per‑pupil payment calculated under section 20.

(2) Special education pupils funded under section 53a shall not be funded under this section.

(3) If the funds allocated under this section are insufficient to fully fund the adjustments under subsection (1), payments under this section shall be prorated on an equal per‑pupil basis.

(4) Payments to districts under this section shall be made according to the payment schedule under section 17b.

SEC. 25H. (1) FROM THE FUNDS APPROPRIATED IN SECTION 11, THERE IS ALLOCATED FOR 2018‑2019 AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $100,000.00 TO AN ELIGIBLE DISTRICT FOR A PROGRAM TO REDUCE THE NUMBER OF HIGH SCHOOL DROPOUTS.

(2) A DISTRICT IS ELIGIBLE FOR FUNDS UNDER THIS SECTION IF THE DISTRICT MEETS ALL OF THE FOLLOWING:

(A) HAS A PUPIL MEMBERSHIP GREATER THAN 15,000.

(B) IS LOCATED IN AN INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT FOR WHICH THE COMBINED PUPIL MEMBERSHIPS OF ALL OF ITS CONSTITUENT DISTRICTS IS GREATER THAN 100,000 AND LESS THAN 120,000.

(C) COLLABORATES WITH A PROGRAM ALIGNED WITH THE GOALS AND STRATEGIES OF THE DEPARTMENT’S TOP TEN IN TEN AND THE RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE CAREER PATHWAY ALLIANCE TO INCREASE DISTRICT GRADUATION RATES, ATTENDANCE RATES, AND CAREER READINESS FOR AT‑RISK YOUTH.

Sec. 26a. From the funds appropriated in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $17,000,000.00 each fiscal year for 2016‑2017 and $15,000,000.00 for 2017‑2018 AND THERE IS ALLOCATED AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $15,000,000.00 FOR 2018‑2019 to reimburse districts and intermediate districts pursuant to section 12 of the Michigan renaissance zone act, 1996 PA 376, MCL 125.2692, for taxes levied in 2016 and 2017 2017 AND 2018, as applicable. The allocations shall be made not later than 60 days after the department of treasury certifies to the department and to the state budget director that the department of treasury has received all necessary information to properly determine the amounts due to each eligible recipient.

Sec. 26b. (1) From the appropriation in section 11, there is allocated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 an amount not to exceed $4,405,100.00 for payments to districts, intermediate districts, and community college districts for the portion of the payment in lieu of taxes obligation that is attributable to districts, intermediate districts, and community college districts pursuant to UNDER section 2154 of the natural resources and environmental protection act, 1994 PA 451, MCL 324.2154.

(2) If the amount appropriated under this section is not sufficient to fully pay obligations under this section, payments shall be prorated on an equal basis among all eligible districts, intermediate districts, and community college districts.

Sec. 26c. (1) From the appropriation in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $1,500,000.00 $1,600,000.00 for 2017‑2018 AND THERE IS ALLOCATED AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $3,000,000.00 FOR 2018‑2019 to the promise zone fund created in subsection (3). The funds allocated under this section reflect the amount of revenue from the collection of the state education tax captured under section 17(2) of the Michigan promise zone authority act, 2008 PA 549, MCL 390.1677.

(2) Funds allocated to the promise zone fund under this section shall be used solely for payments to eligible districts and intermediate districts, in accordance with section 17(3) of the Michigan promise zone authority act, 2008 PA 549, MCL 390.1677, that have a promise zone development plan approved by the department of treasury under section 7 of the Michigan promise zone authority act, 2008 PA 549, MCL 390.1667. Eligible districts and intermediate districts shall use payments made under this section for reimbursement for qualified educational expenses as defined in section 3 of the Michigan promise zone authority act, 2008 PA 549, MCL 390.1663.

(3) The promise zone fund is created as a separate account within the state school aid fund to be used solely for the purposes of the Michigan promise zone authority act, 2008 PA 549, MCL 390.1661 to 390.1679. All of the following apply to the promise zone fund:

(a) The state treasurer shall direct the investment of the promise zone fund. The state treasurer shall credit to the promise zone fund interest and earnings from fund investments.

(b) Money in the promise zone fund at the close of a fiscal year shall remain in the promise zone fund and shall not lapse to the general fund.

(4) Subject to subsection (2), the state treasurer may make payments from the promise zone fund to eligible districts and intermediate districts pursuant to the Michigan promise zone authority act, 2008 PA 549, MCL 390.1661 to 390.1679, to be used for the purposes of a promise zone authority created under that act.

(5) Notwithstanding section 17b, payments under this section shall be paid on a schedule determined by the department.

Sec. 31a. (1) From the state school aid fund money appropriated in section 11, there is allocated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 an amount not to exceed $510,207,300.00 for payments to eligible districts and eligible public school academies for the purposes of ensuring that pupils are proficient in English language arts by the end of grade 3, that pupils are proficient in mathematics by the end of grade 8, that pupils are attending school regularly, that high school graduates are career and college ready, and for the purposes under subsections (7) and (8).

(2) For a district that has combined state and local revenue per membership pupil under sections 20 and 20m that is greater than the basic foundation allowance under section 20 for the current fiscal year, the allocation under this section shall be an amount equal to 30% of the allocation for which it would otherwise be eligible under this section before any proration under subsection (14).

(3) For a district or public school academy to be eligible to receive funding under this section, other than funding under subsection (7) or (8), the district or public school academy, for grades K to 3, 12, shall comply with the requirements under section 1280f of the revised school code, MCL 380.1280f, and SHALL use resources to address early literacy AND NUMERACY, and for at least grades 4 K to 8 12 or, if the district or public school academy does not operate all of grades 4 K to 8, 12, for all of the grades it operates, must implement a multi‑tiered system of supports that is an evidence‑based model FRAMEWORK that uses data‑driven problem solving to integrate academic and behavioral instruction and that uses intervention delivered to all pupils in varying intensities based on pupil needs. This THE multi‑tiered system of supports DESCRIBED IN THIS SUBSECTION must provide at least all of the following essential elements:COMPONENTS:

(a) Implements effective instruction for all learners.TEAM‑BASED LEADERSHIP.

(b) Intervenes early.A TIERED DELIVERY SYSTEM.

(c) Provides a multitiered model of instruction and intervention that provides the following:

(i) A core curriculum and classroom interventions available to all pupils that meet the needs of most pupils.

(ii) Targeted group interventions.

(iii) Intense individual interventions.

(C) SELECTION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF INSTRUCTION, INTERVENTIONS, AND SUPPORTS.

(d) Monitors pupil progress to inform instruction.A COMPREHENSIVE SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT SYSTEM.

(e) Uses data to make instructional decisions.CONTINUOUS DATA‑BASED DECISION MAKING.

(f) Uses assessments including universal screening, diagnostics, and progress monitoring.

(g) Engages families and the community.

(h) Implements evidencebased, scientifically validated, instruction and intervention.

(i) Implements instruction and intervention practices with fidelity.

(j) Uses a collaborative problem‑solving model.

(4) Except as otherwise provided in this subsection, an eligible district or eligible public school academy shall receive under this section for each membership pupil in the district or public school academy who is determined to be economically disadvantaged, as reported to the center in the form and manner prescribed by the center not later than the fifth Wednesday after the pupil membership count day of the immediately preceding fiscal year, an amount per pupil equal to 11.5% of the statewide weighted average foundation allowance. However, a public school academy that began operations as a public school academy after the pupil membership count day of the immediately preceding school year shall receive under this section for each membership pupil in the public school academy, who is determined to be economically disadvantaged, as reported to the center in the form and manner prescribed by the center not later than the fifth Wednesday after the pupil membership count day of the current fiscal year, an amount per pupil equal to 11.5% of the statewide weighted average foundation allowance.

(5) Except as otherwise provided in this section, a district or public school academy receiving funding under this section shall use that money only to provide instructional programs and direct noninstructional services, including, but not limited to, medical, mental health, or counseling services, for at‑risk pupils; for school health clinics; and for the purposes of subsection (6), (7), or (8). In addition, a district that is a school district of the first class or a district or public school academy in which at least 50% of the pupils in membership were determined to be economically disadvantaged in the immediately preceding state fiscal year, as determined and reported as described in subsection (4), may use not more than 20% of the funds it receives under this section for school security. A district or public school academy shall not use any of that money for administrative costs. The instruction or direct noninstructional services provided under this section may be conducted before or after regular school hours or by adding extra school days to the school year. FUNDS SPENT ON SCHOOL SECURITY UNDER THIS SUBSECTION MUST BE COUNTED TOWARD REQUIRED SPENDING UNDER SUBSECTION (16)(B).

(6) A district or public school academy that receives funds under this section and that operates a school breakfast program under section 1272a of the revised school code, MCL 380.1272a, shall use from the funds received under this section an amount, not to exceed $10.00 per pupil for whom the district or public school academy receives funds under this section, necessary to pay for costs associated with the operation of the school breakfast program.

(7) From the funds allocated under subsection (1), there is allocated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 an amount not to exceed $6,057,300.00 to support primary health care services provided to children and adolescents up to age 21. These funds shall be expended in a form and manner determined jointly by the department and the department of health and human services. If any funds allocated under this subsection are not used for the purposes of this subsection for the fiscal year in which they are allocated, those unused funds shall be used that fiscal year to avoid or minimize any proration that would otherwise be required under subsection (14) for that fiscal year.

(8) From the funds allocated under subsection (1), there is allocated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 an amount not to exceed $5,150,000.00 for the state portion of the hearing and vision screenings as described in section 9301 of the public health code, 1978 PA 368, MCL 333.9301. A local public health department shall pay at least 50% of the total cost of the screenings. The frequency of the screenings shall be as required under R 325.13091 to R 325.13096 and R 325.3271 to R 325.3276 of the Michigan Administrative Code. Funds shall be awarded in a form and manner approved jointly by the department and the department of health and human services. Notwithstanding section 17b, payments to eligible entities under this subsection shall be paid on a schedule determined by the department.

(9) Each district or public school academy receiving funds under this section shall submit to the department by July 15 of each fiscal year a report, in the form and manner prescribed by the department, that includes a brief description of each program conducted or services performed by the district or public school academy using funds under this section, the amount of funds under this section allocated to each of those programs or services, the total number of at‑risk pupils served by each of those programs or services, and the data necessary for the department and the department of health and human services to verify matching funds for the temporary assistance for needy families program. In prescribing the form and manner of the report, the department shall ensure that districts are allowed to expend funds received under this section on any activities that are permissible under this section. If a district or public school academy does not comply with this subsection, the department shall withhold an amount equal to the August payment due under this section until the district or public school academy complies with this subsection. If the district or public school academy does not comply with this subsection by the end of the state fiscal year, the withheld funds shall be forfeited to the school aid fund.

(10) In order to receive funds under this section, a district or public school academy shall allow access for the department or the department’s designee to audit all records related to the program for which it receives those funds. The district or public school academy shall reimburse the state for all disallowances found in the audit.

(11) Subject to subsections (6), (7), and (8), FOR SCHOOLS IN WHICH MORE THAN 40% OF PUPILS ARE IDENTIFIED AS AT‑RISK, a district or public school academy may use up to 100% of the funds it receives under this section to implement schoolwide reform in schools with 40% or more of their pupils identified as at‑risk pupils by providing instructional or noninstructional services consistent with the school improvement plan.REFORMS THAT ARE GUIDED BY THE DISTRICT’S COMPREHENSIVE NEEDS ASSESSMENT AND ARE INCLUDED IN THE DISTRICT IMPROVEMENT PLAN. SCHOOLWIDE REFORMS MUST INCLUDE PARENT AND COMMUNITY SUPPORTS, ACTIVITIES, AND SERVICES, THAT MAY INCLUDE THE PATHWAYS TO POTENTIAL PROGRAM CREATED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OR THE COMMUNITIES IN SCHOOLS PROGRAM.

(12) A district or public school academy that receives funds under this section may use up to 3% 5% of those funds to provide research‑based professional development AND TO IMPLEMENT A COACHING MODEL THAT SUPPORTS THE MULTI‑TIERED SYSTEM OF SUPPORTS FRAMEWORK. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT MAY BE PROVIDED to district and school leadership and teachers that is AND MUST BE aligned to professional learning standards; is integrated into district, school building, and classroom practices; and is solely related to the following:

(a) Implementing the multi‑tiered system of supports required in subsection (3) with fidelity and utilizing the data from that system to inform curriculum and instruction.

(b) Implementing section 1280f of the revised school code, MCL 380.1280f, as required under subsection (3), with fidelity.

(13) A district or public school academy that receives funds under this section may use funds received under this section to support instructional or behavioral coaches. Funds used for this purpose are not subject to the cap under subsection (12).

(14) If necessary, and before any proration required under section 296, the department shall prorate payments under this section by reducing the amount of the allocation as otherwise calculated under this section by an equal percentage per district.

(15) If a district is dissolved pursuant to section 12 of the revised school code, MCL 380.12, the intermediate district to which the dissolved school district was constituent shall determine the estimated number of pupils that are economically disadvantaged and that are enrolled in each of the other districts within the intermediate district and provide that estimate to the department for the purposes of distributing funds under this section within 60 days after the school district is declared dissolved.

(16) Beginning in 2018‑2019, 2019‑2020, if a district or public school academy does not demonstrate to the satisfaction of the department that at least 50% of at‑risk pupils are proficient in English language arts by the end of grade 3 as measured by the state assessment for the immediately preceding school year OR HAVE ACHIEVED AT LEAST 1 YEAR’S GROWTH IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS DURING GRADE 3 AS MEASURED BY A LOCAL BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT FOR THE IMMEDIATELY PRECEDING SCHOOL YEAR, DEMONSTRATE TO THE SATISFACTION OF THE DEPARTMENT THAT AT LEAST 50% OF AT‑RISK PUPILS ARE PROFICIENT IN MATHEMATICS BY THE END OF GRADE 8 AS MEASURED BY THE STATE ASSESSMENT FOR THE IMMEDIATELY PRECEDING SCHOOL YEAR OR HAVE ACHIEVED AT LEAST 1 YEAR’S GROWTH IN MATHEMATICS DURING GRADE 8 AS MEASURED BY A LOCAL BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT FOR THE IMMEDIATELY PRECEDING SCHOOL YEAR, and demonstrate to the satisfaction of the department improvement over each of the 3 immediately preceding school years in the percentage of at‑risk pupils that are career‑ and college‑ready as determined by proficiency on the English language arts, mathematics, and science content area assessments on the grade 11 summative assessment under section 1279g(2)(a) of the revised school code, MCL 380.1279g, the district or public school academy shall ensure all of the following:

(a) The district or public school academy shall determine the proportion of total at‑risk pupils that represents the number of pupils in grade 3 that are not proficient in English language arts by the end of grade 3 OR THAT DID NOT ACHIEVE AT LEAST 1 YEAR’S GROWTH IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS DURING GRADE 3, and the district or public school academy shall expend that same proportion multiplied by 1/2 1/3 of its total at‑risk funds under this section on tutoring and other methods of improving grade 3 English language arts proficiency OR GROWTH.

(B) THE DISTRICT OR PUBLIC SCHOOL ACADEMY SHALL DETERMINE THE PROPORTION OF TOTAL AT‑RISK PUPILS THAT REPRESENTS THE NUMBER OF PUPILS IN GRADE 8 THAT ARE NOT PROFICIENT IN MATHEMATICS BY THE END OF GRADE 8 OR THAT DID NOT ACHIEVE AT LEAST 1 YEAR’S GROWTH IN MATHEMATICS DURING GRADE 8, AND THE DISTRICT OR PUBLIC SCHOOL ACADEMY SHALL EXPEND THAT SAME PROPORTION MULTIPLIED BY 1/3 OF ITS TOTAL AT‑RISK FUNDS UNDER THIS SECTION ON TUTORING AND OTHER METHODS OF IMPROVING GRADE 8 MATHEMATICS PROFICIENCY OR GROWTH.

(C) (b) The district or public school academy shall determine the proportion of total at‑risk pupils that represent the number of pupils in grade 11 that are not career‑ and college‑ready as measured by the student’s score on the English language arts, mathematics, and science content area assessments on the grade 11 summative assessment under section 1279g(2)(a) of the revised school code, MCL 380.1279g, and the district or public school academy shall expend that same proportion multiplied by 1/2 1/3 of its total at‑risk funds under this section on tutoring and other activities to improve scores on the college entrance examination portion of the Michigan merit examination.

(17) As used in subsection (16), “total at‑risk pupils” means the sum of the number of pupils in grade 3 that are not proficient in English language arts by the end of third grade as measured on the state assessment AT‑RISK AND THE NUMBER OF PUPILS IN GRADE 8 THAT ARE AT‑RISK and the number of pupils in grade 11 that are not career and collegeready as measured by the student’s score on the English language arts, mathematics, and science content area assessments on the grade 11 summative assessment under section 1279g(2)(a) of the revised school code, MCL 380.1279g.AT‑RISK.

(18) A district or public school academy that receives funds under this section may use funds received under this section to provide an anti‑bullying or crisis intervention program.

(19) The department shall collaborate with the department of health and human services to prioritize assigning Pathways to Potential Success coaches to elementary schools that have a high percentage of pupils in grades K to 3 who are not proficient in English language arts, based upon state assessments for pupils in those grades.

(20) For the purpose of determining the number of economically disadvantaged pupils enrolled in a community district for 2017‑2018, disadvantaged pupils who were enrolled in the education achievement system for 2016‑2017 shall be considered to have been enrolled in the community district for 2016‑2017.

(20) (21) As used in this section:

(a) “At‑risk pupil” means a pupil IN GRADES K TO 12 for whom the district has documentation that the pupil meets any of the following criteria:

(i) The pupil is economically disadvantaged.

(ii) The pupil is an English language learner.

(iii) The pupil is chronically absent as defined by and reported to the center.

(iv) The pupil is a victim of child abuse or neglect.

(v) The pupil is a pregnant teenager or teenage parent.

(vi) The pupil has a family history of school failure, incarceration, or substance abuse.

(vii) The pupil is an immigrant who has immigrated within the immediately preceding 3 years.

(viii) The pupil did not complete high school in 4 years and is still continuing in school as identified in the Michigan cohort graduation and dropout report.

(ix) For pupils for whom the results of the state summative assessment have been received, is a pupil who did not achieve proficiency on the English language arts, mathematics, science, or social studies content area assessment.

(x) Is a pupil who is at risk of not meeting the district’s or public school academy’s core academic curricular objectives in English language arts or mathematics, as demonstrated on local assessments.

(b) “Economically disadvantaged” means a pupil who has been determined eligible for free or reduced‑price meals as determined under the Richard B. Russell national school lunch act, 42 USC 1751 to 1769j; who is in a household receiving supplemental nutrition assistance program or temporary assistance for needy families assistance; or who is homeless, migrant, or in foster care, as reported to the center.

(c) “English language learner” means limited English proficient pupils who speak a language other than English as their primary language and have difficulty speaking, reading, writing, or understanding English as reported to the center.

(d) “Statewide weighted average foundation allowance” means the number that is calculated by adding together the result of each district’s or public school academy’s foundation allowance or per pupil payment calculated under section 20 multiplied by the number of pupils in membership in that district or public school academy, and then dividing that total by the statewide number of pupils in membership. For the purposes of this calculation, a district’s foundation allowance shall not exceed the basic foundation allowance under section 20 for the current state fiscal year.

Sec. 31b. (1) From the appropriations in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $1,500,000.00 $750,000.00 for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for grants to at‑risk districts for implementing a balanced calendar instructional program for at least  1 of its schools.

(2) The department shall select districts for grants under this section from among applicant districts that meet both of the following:

(a) The district meets 1 or both of the following:

(i) Is eligible in 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for the community eligibility option for free and reduced price lunch under 42 USC 1759a.

(ii) At least 50% of the pupils in membership in the district met the income eligibility criteria for free breakfast, lunch, or milk in the immediately preceding state fiscal year, as determined under the Richard B. Russell national school lunch act, 42 USC 1751 to 1769j.

(b) The board of the district has adopted a resolution stating that the district will implement for the first time a balanced calendar instructional program that will begin in 2018‑2019 2019‑2020 for at least 1 school operated by the district and committing to providing the balanced calendar instructional program in each of those schools for at least 3 school years.

(3) A district seeking a grant under this section shall apply to the department in the form and manner prescribed by the department not later than December 1, 2017. 2018. The department shall select districts for grants and make notification not later than February 1, 2018.2019.

(4) The department shall award grants under this section on a competitive basis, but shall give priority based solely on consideration of the following criteria:

(a) Giving priority to districts that, in the immediately preceding fiscal year, had lower general fund balances as a percentage of revenues.

(b) Giving priority to districts that operate at least 1 school that has been identified by the department as either a priority school or a focus school.

(c) Ensuring that grant funding includes both rural and urban districts.

(5) The amount of a grant under this section to any 1 district shall not exceed $750,000.00.

(6) A grant payment under this section to a district shall be used for necessary modifications to instructional facilities and other nonrecurring costs of preparing for the operation of a balanced calendar instructional program as approved by the department.

(7) A district receiving a grant under this section is not required to provide more than the minimum number of days and hours of pupil instruction prescribed under section 101, but shall spread at least those minimum amounts of pupil instruction over the entire year in each of its schools in which a balanced calendar instructional calendar is implemented. The district shall commit to providing the balanced calendar instructional calendar in each of those schools for at least 3 school years.

(8) For a district receiving a grant under this section, excessive heat is considered to be a condition not within the control of school authorities for the purpose of days or hours being counted as days or hours of pupil instruction under section 101(4).

(9) Notwithstanding section 17b, grant payments to districts under this section shall be paid on a schedule determined by the department.

Sec. 31d. (1) From the appropriations in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $22,495,100.00 $22,802,000.00 for 2017‑2018 AND THERE IS ALLOCATED AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $23,144,000.00 FOR 2018‑2019 for the purpose of making payments to districts and other eligible entities under this section.

(2) The amounts allocated from state sources under this section shall be used to pay the amount necessary to reimburse districts for 6.0127% of the necessary costs of the state mandated portion of the school lunch programs provided by those districts. The amount due to each district under this section shall be computed by the department using the methods of calculation adopted by the Michigan supreme court in the consolidated cases known as Durant v State of Michigan, Durant v State of Michigan, 456 Mich 175 (1997).

(3) The payments made under this section include all state payments made to districts so that each district receives at least 6.0127% of the necessary costs of operating the state mandated portion of the school lunch program in a fiscal year.

(4) The payments made under this section to districts and other eligible entities that are not required under section 1272a of the revised school code, MCL 380.1272a, to provide a school lunch program shall be in an amount not to exceed $10.00 per eligible pupil plus 5 cents for each free lunch and 2 cents for each reduced price lunch provided, as determined by the department.

(5) From the federal funds appropriated in section 11, there is allocated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 all available federal funding, estimated at $520,000,000.00 for the national school lunch program and all available federal funding, estimated at $3,200,000.00 for the emergency food assistance program.

(6) Notwithstanding section 17b, payments to eligible entities other than districts under this section shall be paid on a schedule determined by the department.

(7) In purchasing food for a school lunch program funded under this section, preference shall be given to food that is grown or produced by Michigan businesses if it is competitively priced and of comparable quality.

Sec. 31f. (1) From the appropriations in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $4,500,000.00 each fiscal year for 2016‑2017 and for 2017‑2018 FOR 2018‑2019 for the purpose of making payments to districts to reimburse for the cost of providing breakfast.

(2) The funds allocated under this section for school breakfast programs shall be made available to all eligible applicant districts that meet all of the following criteria:

(a) The district participates in the federal school breakfast program and meets all standards as prescribed by 7 CFR parts 220 and 245.

(b) Each breakfast eligible for payment meets the federal standards described in subdivision (a).

(3) The payment for a district under this section is at a per meal rate equal to the lesser of the district’s actual cost or 100% of the statewide average cost of a breakfast served, as determined and approved by the department, less federal reimbursement, participant payments, and other state reimbursement. The statewide average cost shall be determined by the department using costs as reported in a manner approved by the department for the preceding school year.

(4) Notwithstanding section 17b, payments under this section may be made pursuant to an agreement with the department.

(5) In purchasing food for a school breakfast program funded under this section, preference shall be given to food that is grown or produced by Michigan businesses if it is competitively priced and of comparable quality.

Sec. 31j. (1) From the general fund money appropriated in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $375,000.00 $575,000.00 for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for a pilot project to support districts in the purchase of locally grown fruits and vegetables as described in this section.

(2) The department shall provide funding IN AN AMOUNT EQUAL TO $125,000.00 PER REGION to districts in prosperity regions 2, 4, 6, and 9 for the pilot project described under this section. IN ADDITION, THE DEPARTMENT SHALL PROVIDE FUNDING IN AN AMOUNT EQUAL TO $75,000.00 TO DISTRICTS IN PROSPERITY REGION 8 FOR THE PILOT PROJECT DESCRIBED UNDER THIS SECTION. From the funding to districts in subsection (1), funding retained by prosperity regions that administer the project shall not exceed 10%, and funding retained by the department for administration shall not exceed 6%. A prosperity region may enter into a memorandum of understanding with the department or another prosperity region, or both, to administer the project. If the department administers the project for a prosperity region, the department may retain up to 10% of that prosperity region’s funding for administration.

(3) The department shall develop and implement a competitive grant program for districts within the identified prosperity regions to assist in paying for the costs incurred by the district to purchase or increase purchases of whole or minimally processed fruits, vegetables, and legumes grown in this state. The maximum amount that may be drawn down on a grant to a district shall be based on the number of meals served by the school district during the previous school year under the Richard B. Russell national school lunch act, 42 USC 1751 to 1769j. The department shall collaborate with the Michigan department of agriculture and rural development to provide training to newly participating schools and electronic information on Michigan agriculture.

(4) The goals of the pilot project include improving daily nutrition and eating habits for children through the school settings while investing in Michigan’s agricultural and related food business economy.

(5) A district that receives a grant under this section shall use those funds for the costs incurred by the school district to purchase whole or minimally processed fruits, vegetables, and legumes that meet all of the following:

(a) Are purchased on or after the date the district received notification from the department of the amount to be distributed to the district under this subsection, including purchases made to launch meals in September 2017 2018 for the 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 school year.

(b) Are grown in this state and, if minimally processed, are also processed in this state.

(c) Are used for meals that are served as part of the United States Department of Agriculture’s child nutrition programs.

(6) For Michigan‑grown fruits, vegetables, and legumes that satisfy the requirements of subsection (5), matching reimbursements shall be made in an amount not to exceed 10 cents for every school meal that is served as part of the United States Department of Agriculture’s child nutrition programs and that uses Michigan‑grown fruits, vegetables, and legumes.

(7) A district that receives a grant for reimbursement under this section shall use the grant to purchase whole or minimally processed fruits, vegetables, and legumes that are grown in this state and, if minimally processed, are also processed in this state.

(8) In awarding grants under this section, the department shall work in conjunction with prosperity region offices, in consultation with Michigan‑based farm to school resource organizations, to develop scoring criteria that assess an applicant’s ability to procure Michigan‑grown products, prepare and menu Michigan‑grown products, promote and market Michigan‑grown products, and submit letters of intent from districts on plans for educational activities that promote the goals of the program.

(9) The department shall give preference to districts that propose educational activities that meet 1 or more of the following: promote healthy food activities; have clear educational objectives; involve parents or the community; and connect to a school’s farm‑to‑school procurement activities; AND MARKET AND PROMOTE THE PROGRAM, LEADING TO INCREASED PUPIL KNOWLEDGE AND CONSUMPTION OF MICHIGAN—GROWN PRODUCTS. APPLICATIONS WITH ROBUST MARKETING AND PROMOTIONAL ACTIVITIES SHALL RECEIVE STRONGER WEIGHTING AND CONSIDERATION.

(10) In awarding grants, the department shall also consider all of the following: the percentage of children who qualify for free or reduced price school meals under the Richard B. Russell national school lunch act, 42 USC 1751 to 1769j; the variety of school sizes and geographic locations within the identified prosperity regions; and existing or future collaboration opportunities between more than 1 district in a prosperity region.

(11) As a condition of receiving a grant under this section, a district shall provide or direct its vendors to provide to prosperity region offices copies of monthly receipts that show the quantity of different Michigan‑grown fruits, vegetables, and legumes purchased, the amount of money spent on each of these products, and the name and Michigan location of the farm that grew the products, AND THE METHODS OR PLANS TO MARKET AND PROMOTE THE PROGRAM. The district shall also provide to the prosperity region monthly lunch numbers and lunch participation rates, and calendars or monthly menus noting when and how Michigan‑grown products were used in meals. The district and school food service director or directors also shall agree to respond to brief online surveys and to provide a report that shows the percentage relationship of Michigan spending compared to total food spending. Not later than March 1, 2018, 2019, each prosperity region office, either on its own or in conjunction with another prosperity region, shall submit a report to the department on expected outcomes and related measurements for economic development and children’s nutrition and readiness to learn based on progress so far. The report shall include at least all of the following:

(a) The extent to which farmers and related businesses, including distributors and processors, see an increase in market opportunities and income generation through sales of Michigan or local products to districts. All of the following apply for purposes of this subdivision:

(i) The data used to determine the amount of this increase shall be the total dollar amount of Michigan or local fruits, vegetables, and legumes purchased by schools, along with the number of different types of products purchased; school food purchasing trends identified along with products that are of new and growing interest among food service directors; the number of businesses impacted; and the percentage of total food budget spent on Michigan‑grown fruits, vegetables, and legumes.

(ii) The prosperity region office shall use purchasing data collected for the project and surveys of school food service directors on the impact and success of the project as the source for the data described in subparagraph (i).

(b) The ability to which pupils can access a variety of healthy Michigan‑grown foods through schools and increase their consumption of those foods. All of the following apply for purposes of this subdivision:

(i) The data used to determine whether this subparagraph is met shall be the number of pupils exposed to Michigan‑grown fruits, vegetables, and legumes at schools; the variety of products served; new items taste‑tested or placed on menus; and the increase in pupil willingness to try new local, healthy foods.

(ii) The prosperity region office shall use purchasing data collected for the project, meal count and enrollment numbers, school menu calendars, and surveys of school food service directors as the source for the data described in subparagraph (i).

(12) The department shall compile the reports provided by prosperity region offices under subsection (11) into 1 legislative report. The department shall provide this report not later than April 1, 2018 2019 to the house and senate subcommittees responsible for school aid, the house and senate fiscal agencies, and the state budget director.

SEC. 31M. (1) THE SCHOOL MENTAL HEALTH AND SUPPORT SERVICES FUND IS CREATED AS A SEPARATE ACCOUNT WITHIN THE STATE SCHOOL AID FUND.

(2) THE STATE TREASURER MAY RECEIVE MONEY OR OTHER ASSETS FROM ANY SOURCE FOR DEPOSIT INTO THE SCHOOL MENTAL HEALTH AND SUPPORT SERVICES FUND. THE STATE TREASURER SHALL DIRECT THE INVESTMENT OF THE SCHOOL MENTAL HEALTH AND SUPPORT SERVICES FUND AND SHALL CREDIT TO THE SCHOOL MENTAL HEALTH AND SUPPORT SERVICES FUND INTEREST AND EARNINGS FROM THE SCHOOL MENTAL HEALTH AND SUPPORT SERVICES FUND.

(3) MONEY AVAILABLE IN THE SCHOOL MENTAL HEALTH AND SUPPORT SERVICES FUND SHALL NOT BE EXPENDED WITHOUT A SPECIFIC APPROPRIATION.

(4) MONEY IN THE SCHOOL MENTAL HEALTH AND SUPPORT SERVICES FUND AT THE CLOSE OF THE FISCAL YEAR SHALL REMAIN IN THE SCHOOL MENTAL HEALTH AND SUPPORT SERVICES FUND AND SHALL NOT LAPSE TO THE STATE SCHOOL AID FUND OR TO THE GENERAL FUND. THE DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY SHALL BE THE ADMINISTRATOR OF THE SCHOOL MENTAL HEALTH AND SUPPORT SERVICES FUND FOR AUDITING PURPOSES.

(5) FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2018, $30,000,000.00 FROM THE STATE SCHOOL AID FUND SHALL BE DEPOSITED INTO THE SCHOOL MENTAL HEALTH AND SUPPORT SERVICES FUND TO BE USED TO SUPPORT EFFORTS TO IMPROVE MENTAL HEALTH AND SUPPORT SERVICES FOR K‑12 PUPILS IN THIS STATE, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, IMPROVED ACCESS TO COUNSELING SERVICES, EDUCATIONAL AWARENESS PROGRAMS, AND ENHANCED MENTAL HEALTH AND CLINICAL SERVICES.

Sec. 32d. (1) From the funds appropriated in section 11, there is allocated to eligible intermediate districts and consortia of intermediate districts for great start readiness programs an amount not to exceed $243,600,000.00 for 2017‑2018. 2018‑2019. Funds allocated under this section for great start readiness programs shall be used to provide part‑day, school‑day, or GSRP/Head Start blended comprehensive free compensatory classroom programs designed to improve the readiness and subsequent achievement of educationally disadvantaged children who meet the participant eligibility and prioritization guidelines as defined by the department. For a child to be eligible to participate in a program under this section, the child shall be at least 4, but less than 5, years of age as of September 1 of the school year in which the program is offered and shall meet those eligibility and prioritization guidelines. A child who is not 4 years of age as of September 1, but who will be 4 years of age not later than December 1, is eligible to participate if the child’s parent or legal guardian seeks a waiver from the September 1 eligibility date by submitting a request for enrollment in a program to the responsible intermediate district, if the program has capacity on or after September 1 of the school year, and if the child meets eligibility and prioritization guidelines.

(2) Funds FROM THE FUNDS allocated under subsection (1), shall be AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $242,600,000.00 IS allocated to intermediate districts or consortia of intermediate districts based on the formula in section 39. An intermediate district or consortium of intermediate districts receiving funding under this section shall act as the fiduciary for the great start readiness programs. In order to be eligible to receive funds allocated under this subsection from an intermediate district or consortium of intermediate districts, a district, a consortium of districts, or a public or private for‑profit or nonprofit legal entity or agency shall comply with this section and section 39.

(3) In addition to the allocation under subsection (1), from the general fund money appropriated under section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $300,000.00 for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for a competitive grant to continue a longitudinal evaluation of children who have participated in great start readiness programs.

(4) To be eligible for funding under this section, a program shall prepare children for success in school through comprehensive part‑day, school‑day, or GSRP/Head Start blended programs that contain all of the following program components, as determined by the department:

(a) Participation in a collaborative recruitment and enrollment process to assure that each child is enrolled in the program most appropriate to his or her needs and to maximize the use of federal, state, and local funds.

(b) An age‑appropriate educational curriculum that is in compliance with the early childhood standards of quality for prekindergarten children adopted by the state board, including, at least, the Connect4Learning curriculum.

(c) Nutritional services for all program participants supported by federal, state, and local resources as applicable.

(d) Physical and dental health and developmental screening services for all program participants.

(e) Referral services for families of program participants to community social service agencies, including mental health services, as appropriate.

(f) Active and continuous involvement of the parents or guardians of the program participants.

(g) A plan to conduct and report annual great start readiness program evaluations and continuous improvement plans using criteria approved by the department.

(h) Participation in a school readiness advisory committee convened as a workgroup of the great start collaborative that provides for the involvement of classroom teachers, parents or guardians of program participants, and community, volunteer, and social service agencies and organizations, as appropriate. The advisory committee annually shall review and make recommendations regarding the program components listed in this subsection. The advisory committee also shall make recommendations to the great start collaborative regarding other community services designed to improve all children’s school readiness.

(i) The ongoing articulation of the kindergarten and first grade programs offered by the program provider.

(j) Participation in this state’s great start to quality process with a rating of at least 3 stars.

(5) An application for funding under this section shall provide for the following, in a form and manner determined by the department:

(a) Ensure compliance with all program components described in subsection (4).

(b) Except as otherwise provided in this subdivision, ensure that at least 90% of the children participating in an eligible great start readiness program for whom the intermediate district is receiving funds under this section are children who live with families with a household income that is equal to or less than 250% of the federal poverty level. If the intermediate district determines that all eligible children are being served and that there are no children on the waiting list who live with families with a household income that is equal to or less than 250% of the federal poverty level, the intermediate district may then enroll children who live with families with a household income that is equal to or less than 300% of the federal poverty level. The enrollment process shall consider income and risk factors, such that children determined with higher need are enrolled before children with lesser need. For purposes of this subdivision, all age‑eligible children served in foster care or who are experiencing homelessness or who have individualized education plans recommending placement in an inclusive preschool setting shall be considered to live with families with household income equal to or less than 250% of the federal poverty level regardless of actual family income and shall be prioritized for enrollment within the lowest quintile.

(c) Ensure that the applicant only uses qualified personnel for this program, as follows:

(i) Teachers possessing proper training. A lead teacher must have a valid teaching certificate with an early childhood (ZA or ZS) endorsement or a bachelor’s or higher degree in child development or early childhood education with specialization in preschool teaching. However, if an applicant demonstrates to the department that it is unable to fully comply with this subparagraph after making reasonable efforts to comply, teachers who have significant but incomplete training in early childhood education or child development may be used if the applicant provides to the department, and the department approves, a plan for each teacher to come into compliance with the standards in this subparagraph. A teacher’s compliance plan must be completed within 2 years of the date of employment. Progress toward completion of the compliance plan shall consist of at least 2 courses per calendar year.

(ii) Paraprofessionals possessing proper training in early childhood education, including an associate’s degree in early childhood education or child development or the equivalent, or a child development associate (CDA) credential. However, if an applicant demonstrates to the department that it is unable to fully comply with this subparagraph after making reasonable efforts to comply, the applicant may use paraprofessionals who have completed at least 1 course that earns college credit in early childhood education or child development if the applicant provides to the department, and the department approves, a plan for each paraprofessional to come into compliance with the standards in this subparagraph. A paraprofessional’s compliance plan must be completed within 2 years of the date of employment. Progress toward completion of the compliance plan shall consist of at least 2 courses or 60 clock hours of training per calendar year.

(d) Include a program budget that contains only those costs that are not reimbursed or reimbursable by federal funding, that are clearly and directly attributable to the great start readiness program, and that would not be incurred if the program were not being offered. Eligible costs include transportation costs. The program budget shall indicate the extent to which these funds will supplement other federal, state, local, or private funds. Funds received under this section shall not be used to supplant any federal funds received by the applicant to serve children eligible for a federally funded preschool program that has the capacity to serve those children.

(6) For a grant recipient that enrolls pupils in a school‑day program funded under this section, each child enrolled in the school‑day program shall be counted as described in section 39 for purposes of determining the amount of the grant award.

(7) For a grant recipient that enrolls pupils in a GSRP/Head Start blended program, the grant recipient shall ensure that all Head Start and GSRP policies and regulations are applied to the blended slots, with adherence to the highest standard from either program, to the extent allowable under federal law.

(8) An intermediate district or consortium of intermediate districts receiving a grant under this section shall designate an early childhood coordinator, and may provide services directly or may contract with 1 or more districts or public or private for‑profit or nonprofit providers that meet all requirements of subsections (4) and (5).

(9) An intermediate district or consortium of intermediate districts may retain for administrative services provided by the intermediate district or consortium of intermediate districts an amount not to exceed 4% of the grant amount. Expenses incurred by subrecipients engaged by the intermediate district or consortium of intermediate districts for directly running portions of the program shall be considered program costs or a contracted program fee for service.

(10) An intermediate district or consortium of intermediate districts may expend not more than 2% of the total grant amount for outreach, recruiting, and public awareness of the program.

(11) Each grant recipient shall enroll children identified under subsection (5)(b) according to how far the child’s household income is below 250% of the federal poverty level by ranking each applicant child’s household income from lowest to highest and dividing the applicant children into quintiles based on how far the child’s household income is below 250% of the federal poverty level, and then enrolling children in the quintile with the lowest household income before enrolling children in the quintile with the next lowest household income until slots are completely filled. If the grant recipient determines that all eligible children are being served and that there are no children on the waiting list who live with families with a household income that is equal to or less than 250% of the federal poverty level, the grant recipient may then enroll children who live with families with a household income that is equal to or less than 300% of the federal poverty level. The enrollment process shall consider income and risk factors, such that children determined with higher need are enrolled before children with lesser need. For purposes of this subdivision, all age‑eligible children served in foster care or who are experiencing homelessness or who have individualized education plans recommending placement in an inclusive preschool setting shall be considered to live with families with household income equal to or less than 250% of the federal poverty level regardless of actual family income and shall be prioritized for enrollment within the lowest quintile.

(12) An intermediate district or consortium of intermediate districts receiving a grant under this section shall allow parents of eligible children who are residents of the intermediate district or within the consortium to choose a program operated by or contracted with another intermediate district or consortium of intermediate districts and shall enter into a written agreement regarding payment, in a manner prescribed by the department.

(13) An intermediate district or consortium of intermediate districts receiving a grant under this section shall conduct a local process to contract with interested and eligible public and private for‑profit and nonprofit community‑based providers that meet all requirements of subsection (4) for at least 30% of its total allocation. For the purposes of this 30% allocation, an intermediate district or consortium of intermediate districts may count children served by a Head Start grantee or delegate in a blended Head Start and great start readiness school‑day program. Children served in a program funded only through Head Start shall not be counted toward this 30% allocation. The intermediate district or consortium shall report to the department, in a manner prescribed by the department, a detailed list of community‑based providers by provider type, including private for‑profit, private nonprofit, community college or university, Head Start grantee or delegate, and district or intermediate district, and the number and proportion of its total allocation allocated to each provider as subrecipient. If the intermediate district or consortium is not able to contract for at least 30% of its total allocation, the grant recipient shall notify the department and, if the department verifies that the intermediate district or consortium attempted to contract for at least 30% of its total allocation and was not able to do so, then the intermediate district or consortium may retain and use all of its allocation as provided under this section. To be able to use this exemption, the intermediate district or consortium shall demonstrate to the department that the intermediate district or consortium increased the percentage of its total allocation for which it contracts with a community‑based provider and the intermediate district or consortium shall submit evidence satisfactory to the department, and the department must be able to verify this evidence, demonstrating that the intermediate district or consortium took measures to contract for at least 30% of its total allocation as required under this subsection, including, but not limited to, at least all of the following measures:

(a) The intermediate district or consortium notified each nonparticipating licensed child care center located in the service area of the intermediate district or consortium regarding the center’s eligibility to participate, in a manner prescribed by the department.

(b) The intermediate district or consortium provided to each nonparticipating licensed child care center located in the service area of the intermediate district or consortium information regarding great start readiness program requirements and a description of the application and selection process for community‑based providers.

(c) The intermediate district or consortium provided to the public and to participating families a list of community‑based great start readiness program subrecipients with a great start to quality rating of at least 3 stars.

(14) If an intermediate district or consortium of intermediate districts receiving a grant under this section fails to submit satisfactory evidence to demonstrate its effort to contract for at least 30% of its total allocation, as required under subsection (13), the department shall reduce the allocation to the intermediate district or consortium by a percentage equal to the difference between the percentage of an intermediate district’s or consortium’s total allocation awarded to community‑based providers and 30% of its total allocation.

(15) In order to assist intermediate districts and consortia in complying with the requirement to contract with community‑based providers for at least 30% of their total allocation, the department shall do all of the following:

(a) Ensure that a great start resource center or the department provides each intermediate district or consortium receiving a grant under this section with the contact information for each licensed child care center located in the service area of the intermediate district or consortium by March 1 of each year.

(b) Provide, or ensure that an organization with which the department contracts provides, a community‑based provider with a validated great start to quality rating within 90 days of the provider’s having submitted a request and self‑assessment.

(c) Ensure that all intermediate district, district, community college or university, Head Start grantee or delegate, private for‑profit, and private nonprofit providers are subject to a single great start to quality rating system. The rating system shall ensure that regulators process all prospective providers at the same pace on a first‑come, first‑served basis and shall not allow 1 type of provider to receive a great start to quality rating ahead of any other type of provider.

(d) Not later than December 1 of each year, compile the results of the information reported by each intermediate district or consortium under subsection (13) and report to the legislature a list by intermediate district or consortium with the number and percentage of each intermediate district’s or consortium’s total allocation allocated to community‑based providers by provider type, including private for‑profit, private nonprofit, community college or university, Head Start grantee or delegate, and district or intermediate district.

(16) A recipient of funds under this section shall report to the department CENTER in a form and manner prescribed by the department CENTER the number of children participating in the program who meet the income eligibility criteria under subsection (5)(b) and the total number of children participating in the program. For children participating in the program who meet the income eligibility criteria specified under subsection (5)(b), a recipient shall also report whether or not a parent is available to provide care based on employment status. For the purposes of this subsection, “employment status” shall be defined by the department of health and human services in a manner consistent with maximizing the amount of spending that may be claimed for temporary assistance for needy families maintenance of effort purposes.

(17) As used in this section:

(a) “GSRP/Head Start blended program” means a part‑day program funded under this section and a Head Start program, which are combined for a school‑day program.

(b) “Part‑day program” means a program that operates at least 4 days per week, 30 weeks per year, for at least 3 hours of teacher‑child contact time per day but for fewer hours of teacher‑child contact time per day than a school‑day program.

(c) “School‑day program” means a program that operates for at least the same length of day as a district’s first grade program for a minimum of 4 days per week, 30 weeks per year. A classroom that offers a school‑day program must enroll all children for the school day to be considered a school‑day program.

(18) An intermediate district or consortium of intermediate districts receiving funds under this section shall establish and charge tuition according to a sliding scale of tuition rates based upon household income for children participating in an eligible great start readiness program who live with families with a household income that is more than 250% of the federal poverty level to be used by all of its providers, as approved by the department.

(19) From the amount appropriated in subsection (1), there is allocated an amount not to exceed $10,000,000.00 for reimbursement of transportation costs for children attending great start readiness programs funded under this section. To receive reimbursement under this subsection, not later than November 1, 2017, 2018, a program funded under this section that provides transportation shall submit to the intermediate district that is the fiscal agent for the program a projected transportation budget. The amount of the reimbursement for transportation under this subsection shall be no more than the projected transportation budget or $300.00 multiplied by the number of children funded for the program under this section. If the amount allocated under this subsection is insufficient to fully reimburse the transportation costs for all programs that provide transportation and submit the required information, the reimbursement shall be prorated in an equal amount per child funded. Payments shall be made to the intermediate district that is the fiscal agent for each program, and the intermediate district shall then reimburse the program provider for transportation costs as prescribed under this subsection.

(20) SUBJECT TO, AND FROM THE FUNDS ALLOCATED UNDER, SUBSECTION (19), THE DEPARTMENT SHALL REIMBURSE A PROGRAM FOR TRANSPORTATION COSTS RELATED TO PARENT‑ OR GUARDIAN‑ACCOMPANIED TRANSPORTATION PROVIDED BY TRANSPORTATION SERVICE COMPANIES, BUSES, OR OTHER PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION SERVICES. TO BE ELIGIBLE FOR REIMBURSEMENT UNDER THIS SUBSECTION, A PROGRAM MUST BE A COMMUNITY‑BASED PROVIDER AND MUST SUBMIT TO THE DEPARTMENT ALL OF THE FOLLOWING:

(A) THE NAMES OF FAMILIES PROVIDED WITH TRANSPORTATION SUPPORT ALONG WITH A DOCUMENTED REASON FOR THE NEED FOR TRANSPORTATION SUPPORT AND THE TYPE OF TRANSPORTATION PROVIDED.

(B) FINANCIAL DOCUMENTATION OF ACTUAL TRANSPORTATION COSTS INCURRED BY THE PROGRAM, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, RECEIPTS AND MILEAGE REPORTS, AS DETERMINED BY THE DEPARTMENT.

(C) ANY OTHER DOCUMENTATION OR INFORMATION DETERMINED NECESSARY BY THE DEPARTMENT.

(21) (20) The department shall implement a process to review and approve age‑appropriate comprehensive classroom level quality assessments for GSRP grantees that support the early childhood standards of quality for prekindergarten children adopted by the state board. The department shall complete the approval process and make available to intermediate districts at least 2 approved classroom level quality assessments no later than April 1, 2018.THAT WERE APPROVED IN 2018.

(22) (21) An intermediate district that is a GSRP grantee may approve the use of a supplemental curriculum that aligns with and enhances the age‑appropriate educational curriculum in the classroom. If the department objects to the use of a supplemental curriculum approved by an intermediate district, the superintendent of public instruction shall establish a review committee independent of the department. The review committee shall meet within 60 days of the department registering its objection in writing and provide a final determination on the validity of the objection within 60 days of the review committee’s first meeting.

(23) THE DEPARTMENT SHALL IMPLEMENT A PROCESS TO EVALUATE AND APPROVE AGE‑APPROPRIATE EDUCATIONAL CURRICULA THAT ARE IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE EARLY CHILDHOOD STANDARDS OF QUALITY FOR PREKINDERGARTEN CHILDREN ADOPTED BY THE STATE BOARD.

(24) FROM THE FUNDS ALLOCATED UNDER SUBSECTION (1), THERE IS ALLOCATED AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $1,000,000.00 FOR PAYMENTS TO INTERMEDIATE DISTRICTS OR CONSORTIA OF INTERMEDIATE DISTRICTS FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR EDUCATORS IN PROGRAMS IMPLEMENTING NEW CURRICULA IN 2019‑2020.

(25) (22) A great start readiness program or a GSRP/Head Start blended program funded under this section shall be permitted to utilize AmeriCorps Pre‑K Reading Corps members in classrooms implementing research‑based early literacy intervention strategies.

Sec. 32p. (1) From the appropriation in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $13,400,000.00 to intermediate districts for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for the purpose of providing early childhood funding to intermediate school districts to support the activities under subsection (2) and subsection (4), and to provide early childhood programs for children from birth through age 8. The funding provided to each intermediate district under this section shall be determined by the distribution formula established by the department’s office of great start to provide equitable funding statewide. In order to receive funding under this section, each intermediate district shall provide an application to the office of great start not later than September 15 of the immediately preceding fiscal year indicating the activities planned to be provided.

(2) Each intermediate district or consortium of intermediate districts that receives funding under this section shall convene a local great start collaborative and a parent coalition. The goal of each great start collaborative and parent coalition shall be to ensure the coordination and expansion of local early childhood infrastructure and programs that allow every child in the community to achieve the following outcomes:

(a) Children born healthy.

(b) Children healthy, thriving, and developmentally on track from birth to third grade.

(c) Children developmentally ready to succeed in school at the time of school entry.

(d) Children prepared to succeed in fourth grade and beyond by reading proficiently by the end of third grade.

(3) Each local great start collaborative and parent coalition shall convene workgroups to make recommendations about community services designed to achieve the outcomes described in subsection (2) and to ensure that its local great start system includes the following supports for children from birth through age 8:

(a) Physical health.

(b) Social‑emotional health.

(c) Family supports and basic needs.

(d) Parent education.

(e) Early education, including the child’s development of skills linked to success in foundational literacy, and care.

(4) From the funds allocated in subsection (1), at least $2,500,000.00 shall be used for the purpose of providing home visits to at‑risk children and their families. The home visits shall be conducted as part of a locally coordinated, family‑centered, evidence‑based, data‑driven home visit strategic plan that is approved by the department. The goals of the home visits funded under this subsection shall be to improve school readiness using evidence‑based methods, including a focus on developmentally appropriate outcomes for early literacy, to reduce the number of pupils retained in grade level, and to reduce the number of pupils requiring special education services, TO IMPROVE POSITIVE PARENTING PRACTICES, AND TO IMPROVE FAMILY ECONOMIC SELF‑SUFFICIENCY WHILE REDUCING THE IMPACT OF HIGH‑RISK FACTORS THROUGH COMMUNITY RESOURCES AND REFERRALS. The department shall coordinate the goals of the home visit strategic plans approved under this subsection with other state agency home visit programs in a way that strengthens Michigan’s home visiting infrastructure and maximizes federal funds available for the purposes of at‑risk family home visits. The coordination among departments and agencies is intended to avoid duplication of state services and spending, and should emphasize efficient service delivery of home visiting programs.

(5) Not later than December 1 of each year, each intermediate district shall provide a report to the department detailing the activities actually provided during the immediately preceding school year and the families and children actually served. At a minimum, the report shall include an evaluation of the services provided with additional funding under subsection (4) for home visits, using the goals identified in subsection (4) as the basis for the evaluation, including the degree to which school readiness was improved, any change in the number of pupils retained at grade level, and any change in the number of pupils receiving special education services. The department shall compile and summarize these reports and submit its summary to the house and senate appropriations subcommittees on school aid and to the house and senate fiscal agencies not later than February 15 of each year.

(6) An intermediate district or consortium of intermediate districts that receives funding under this section may carry over any unexpended funds received under this section into the next fiscal year and may expend those unused funds through June 30 of the next fiscal year. A recipient of a grant shall return any unexpended grant funds to the department in the manner prescribed by the department not later than September 30 of the next fiscal year after the fiscal year in which the funds are received.

Sec. 32q. From the state school aid fund allocation under section 11, there is allocated to an eligible intermediate district an amount equal to $175,000.00 in 2017‑2018 FOR 2018‑2019 for the purpose of this section. An intermediate district receiving a grant under this section shall partner with an early childhood collaborative to conduct a pilot program as provided under this section. It is the intent of the legislature that this is the second THIRD of 3 years of funding, and that funding FOR THE PILOT PROGRAM shall NOT continue in 2018‑2019. 2019‑2020. Funding allocated to an intermediate district shall be used in partnership with a collaborative to conduct a pilot program to evaluate the relative impact on vulnerable children of 1 versus 2 years of preschool education. All of the following apply to the pilot program funded under this section:

(a) An eligible intermediate district is an intermediate district that is located in a county with a population as of the most recent federal decennial census that was greater than 500,000 but fewer than 800,000 and that has an early learning collaborative located within its boundaries.

(b) The funds shall be used for research, family coaching support, administration, information systems, and evaluation.

(c) In order to be eligible to receive the allocated funds, the early learning collaborative, in partnership with the intermediate district, shall provide the funding for all eligible children included in the pilot program.

(d) The early learning collaborative, in partnership with the intermediate district, shall develop a 3‑year pilot program under the supervision of the office of great start in the department.

(e) For a child to be eligible for participation in the pilot program under this section, the child shall be 3 years of age as of the date specified for determining a child’s eligibility to attend school under section 1147 of the revised school code, MCL 380.1147.

(f) A child participating in the pilot program shall meet the participant eligibility and prioritization guidelines as defined by the department.

(g) Notwithstanding section 17b, the department shall distribute funds under this section not later than November 15 of the fiscal year.

(h) The early learning collaborative, in partnership with the intermediate district, shall provide annual progress evaluations to the office of great start.

(i) By December 1, 2019, the early learning collaborative, in partnership with the intermediate district, shall provide a pilot program report and evaluation to the office of great start. The office of great start shall review the pilot program report and evaluation and, by February 15, 2020, provide a report to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on state school aid and to the senate and house fiscal agencies of its evaluation of the pilot program.

Sec. 35a. (1) From the appropriations in section 11, there is allocated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for the purposes of this section an amount not to exceed $26,900,000.00 from the state school aid fund and an amount not to exceed $2,500,000.00 $3,000,000.00 from the general fund. THE SUPERINTENDENT SHALL DESIGNATE STAFF OR CONTRACTED EMPLOYEES FUNDED UNDER THIS SECTION AS CRITICAL SHORTAGE. PROGRAMS FUNDED UNDER THIS SECTION ARE INTENDED TO ENSURE THAT THIS STATE WILL BE IN THE TOP 10 MOST IMPROVED STATES IN GRADE 4 READING PROFICIENCY BY THE 2019 NATIONAL ASSESSMENT OF EDUCATIONAL PROGRESS (NAEP) AND WILL BE IN THE TOP 10 STATES OVERALL IN GRADE 4 READING PROFICIENCY BY 2025.

(2) A district that receives funds under subsection (5) may spend up to 5% of those funds for professional development for educators in a department‑approved research‑based training program related to current state literacy standards for pupils in grades K to 3. The professional development shall also include training in the use of screening and diagnostic tools, progress monitoring, and intervention methods used to address barriers to learning and delays in learning that are diagnosed through the use of these tools.

(3) A district that receives funds under subsection (5) may use up to 5% of those funds to administer department‑approved screening and diagnostic tools to monitor the development of early literacy and early reading skills of pupils in grades K to 3 and to support research‑based professional development for educators in administering screening and diagnostic tools and in data interpretation of the results obtained through the use of those tools for the purpose of implementing a multi‑tiered system of support to improve reading proficiency among pupils in grades K to 3. A department‑approved screening and diagnostic tool administered by a district using funding under this section must include all of the following components: phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, and comprehension. Further, all of the following sub‑skills must be assessed within each of these components:

(a) Phonemic awareness ‑ segmentation, blending, and sound manipulation (deletion and substitution).

(b) Phonics ‑ decoding (reading) and encoding (spelling).

(c) Fluency ‑ reading rate, accuracy, and expression.

(d) Comprehension ‑ making meaning of text.

(4) From the allocations under subsection (1), there is allocated an amount not to exceed $6,000,000.00 $7,000,000.00 for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for the purpose of providing early literacy coaches at intermediate districts to assist teachers in developing and implementing instructional strategies for pupils in grades K to 3 so that pupils are reading at grade level by the end of grade 3. All of the following apply to funding under this subsection:

(a) The department shall develop an application process consistent with the provisions of this subsection. An application shall provide assurances that literacy coaches funded under this subsection are knowledgeable about at least the following:

(i) Current state literacy standards for pupils in grades K to 3.

(ii) Implementing an instructional delivery model based on frequent use of formative, screening, and diagnostic tools, known as a multi‑tiered system of support, to determine individual progress for pupils in grades K to 3 so that pupils are reading at grade level by the end of grade 3.

(iii) The use of data from diagnostic tools to determine the necessary additional supports and interventions needed by individual pupils in grades K to 3 in order to be reading at grade level.

(b) From the allocation under this subsection, the department shall award grants to intermediate districts for the support of early literacy coaches. An intermediate district must provide matching funds for at least 50% of the grant amount awarded to support the cost of the literacy coach. The department shall provide this funding in the following manner:

(i) Each intermediate district shall be awarded grant funding to support the cost of 1 early literacy coach in an equal amount per early literacy coach, not to exceed $75,000.00.

(ii) After distribution of the grant funding under subparagraph (i), the department shall distribute the remainder of grant funding for additional early literacy coaches in an amount not to exceed $75,000.00 per early literacy coach. The number of funded early literacy coaches for each intermediate district shall be based on the percentage of the total statewide number of pupils in grades K to 3 who meet the income eligibility standards for the federal free and reduced‑price lunch programs who are enrolled in districts in the intermediate district. For each additional early literacy coach funded under this subparagraph, the department shall not make an award to an intermediate district under this subparagraph in an amount that is less than the amount necessary to pay 1/2 of the total cost of that additional early literacy coach.

(5) From the allocations under subsection (1), there is allocated an amount not to exceed $20,900,000.00 $19,900,000.00 for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 to districts that provide additional instructional time to those pupils in grades K to 3 who have been identified by using department‑approved screening and diagnostic tools as needing additional supports and interventions in order to be reading at grade level by the end of grade 3. Additional instructional time may be provided before, during, and after regular school hours or as part of a year‑round balanced school calendar. All of the following apply to funding under this subsection:

(a) In order to be eligible to receive funding, a district shall demonstrate to the satisfaction of the department that the district has done all of the following:

(i) Implemented a multi‑tiered system of support instructional delivery model that is an evidence‑based model that uses data‑driven problem solving to integrate academic and behavioral instruction and that uses intervention delivered to all pupils in varying intensities based on pupil needs. The multi‑tiered system of supports must provide at least all of the following essential elements:COMPONENTS:

(A) Implements effective instruction for all learners.

(B) Intervenes early.

(C) Provides a multitiered model of instruction and intervention that provides the following: a core curriculum and classroom interventions available to all pupils that meet the needs of most pupils; targeted group interventions; and intense individual interventions.

(D) Monitors pupil progress to inform instruction.

(E) Uses data to make instructional decisions.

(F) Uses assessments including universal screening, diagnostics, and progress monitoring.

(G) Engages families and the community.

(H) Implements evidencebased, scientifically validated, instruction and intervention.

(I) Implements instruction and intervention practices with fidelity.

(J) Uses a collaborative problem‑solving model.

(A) TEAM‑BASED LEADERSHIP.

(B) A TIERED DELIVERY SYSTEM.

(C) SELECTION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF INSTRUCTION, INTERVENTIONS, AND SUPPORTS.

(D) A COMPREHENSIVE SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT SYSTEM.

(E) CONTINUOUS DATA‑BASED DECISION MAKING.

(ii) Used department‑approved research‑based diagnostic tools to identify individual pupils in need of additional instructional time.

(iii) Used a reading instruction method that focuses on the 5 fundamental building blocks of reading: phonics, phonemic awareness, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension and content knowledge.

(iv) Provided teachers of pupils in grades K to 3 with research‑based professional development in diagnostic data interpretation.

(v) Complied with the requirements under section 1280f of the revised school code, MCL 380.1280f.

(b) Funding allocated under this subsection shall be distributed to eligible districts by multiplying the number of full‑time‑equivalent pupils in grade 1 in the district by $210.00.ON AN EQUAL PER‑FIRST‑GRADE‑PUPIL BASIS.

(c) If the funds allocated under this subsection are insufficient to fully fund the payments under this subsection, payments under this subsection shall be prorated on an equal per‑pupil basis based on grade 1 pupils.

(6) NOT LATER THAN SEPTEMBER 1, 2019, A DISTRICT THAT RECEIVES FUNDING UNDER THIS SECTION, IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE MICHIGAN DATA HUB NETWORK, IF POSSIBLE, SHALL PROVIDE TO THE DEPARTMENT A REPORT THAT INCLUDES AT LEAST BOTH OF THE FOLLOWING, IN A FORM AND MANNER PRESCRIBED BY THE DEPARTMENT:

(A) FOR PUPILS IN GRADES K TO 3, THE PUPILS, SCHOOLS, AND GRADES SERVED WITH FUNDS UNDER THIS SECTION AND THE CATEGORIES OF SERVICES PROVIDED.

(B) FOR PUPILS IN GRADES K TO 3, PUPIL PROFICIENCY AND GROWTH DATA THAT ALLOWS ANALYSIS BOTH IN THE AGGREGATE AND BY EACH OF THE FOLLOWING SUBGROUPS, AS APPLICABLE:

(i) SCHOOL.

(ii) GRADE LEVEL.

(iii) GENDER.

(iv) RACE.

(v) ETHNICITY.

(vi) ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STATUS.

(vii) DISABILITY.

(viii) PUPILS IDENTIFIED AS HAVING READING DEFICIENCIES.

(7) (6) From the general fund money allocated in subsection (1), the department shall allocate the amount of $2,500,000.00 for 2017‑2018 FOR 2018‑2019 to the Michigan Education Corps FOR THE PREK READING CORPS, THE K3 READING CORPS, AND THE MATH CORPS. All of the following apply to funding under this subsection:

(a) By August SEPTEMBER 1 of the current fiscal year, the Michigan Education Corps shall provide a report concerning its use of the funding to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on state school aid, the senate and house fiscal agencies, and the senate and house caucus policy offices on outcomes and performance measures of the Michigan Education Corps, including, but not limited to, the degree to which the Michigan Education Corps’s replication of the Michigan PREK Reading Corps, program K3 READING CORPS, AND MATH CORPS PROGRAMS is demonstrating sufficient efficacy and impact. The report must include data pertaining to at least all of the following:

(i) The current impact of the Michigan Reading Corps PROGRAMS on this state in terms of numbers of children and programs SCHOOLS receiving support. This portion of the report shall specify the number of children tutored, including dosage and completion, and the demographics of those children.

(ii) Whether the assessments and interventions are implemented with fidelity. This portion of the report shall include details on the total number of assessments and interventions completed and the range, median, mean, and standard deviation. for all assessments.

(iii) Whether the literacy OR MATH improvement of children participating in the Michigan Reading Corps PROGRAMS is consistent with expectations. This portion of the report shall detail at least all of the following:

(A) Growth rate by grade OR AGE level, in comparison to targeted growth rate.

(B) Average linear growth rates.

(C) Exit rates.

(D) Percentage of children who exit who also meet or exceed spring benchmarks.

(iv) The impact of the Michigan Reading Corps PROGRAMS on organizations and stakeholders, including, but not limited to, school administrators, internal coaches, and AmeriCorps members.

(b) If the department determines that the Michigan Education Corps has misused the funds allocated under this subsection, the Michigan Education Corps shall reimburse this state for the amount of state funding misused.

(c) The department may not reserve any portion of the allocation provided under this subsection for an evaluation of the Michigan Education Corps, the Michigan Education Corps’ funding, or the Michigan Education Corps’ programming UNLESS AGREED TO IN WRITING BY THE MICHIGAN EDUCATION CORPS. The department shall award the entire $2,500,000.00 allocated under this subsection to the Michigan Education Corps and shall not condition the awarding of this funding on the implementation of an independent evaluation.

(8) FROM THE GENERAL FUND MONEY ALLOCATED UNDER SUBSECTION (1), THERE IS ALLOCATED AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $500,000.00 FOR 2018‑2019 FOR A GRANT TO AN ELIGIBLE PROGRAM THAT HAS A GOAL TO SLOW OR PREVENT THE K TO 4 SUMMER READING SLIDE AMONG ALL PUPILS ENROLLED IN GRADES K TO 4, PARTICULARLY THOSE FROM ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED HOUSEHOLDS. FUNDS ALLOCATED UNDER THIS SUBSECTION ARE GRANT FUNDS AND MUST BE DISTRIBUTED BY THE DEPARTMENT. A PROGRAM IS ELIGIBLE IF IT MEETS AT LEAST ALL OF THE FOLLOWING:

(A) THE PROGRAM’S OBJECTIVE IS TO DELIVER A BILINGUAL, IN‑HOME, INDIVIDUALIZED SUMMER READING PROGRAM CONSISTING OF SELF‑SELECTED, INDEPENDENT READING LEVEL BOOKS TO K TO 4 PUPILS EACH WEEK DURING THE SUMMER.

(B) IS EVALUATED QUANTITATIVELY AND QUALITATIVELY USING PRE‑ AND POST‑STANDARDIZED TEST SCORE COMPARISON AND PARENT AND SCHOOL SURVEYS SPECIFIC TO EACH DISTRICT.

(C) INCORPORATES AT LEAST WEEKLY INTERACTIVE PARENTAL AND FAMILY ENGAGEMENT DURING THE SUMMER.

(D) BUILDS ON PEDAGOGICAL AND LITERACY PRINCIPLES TO SCAFFOLD FLUENCY TO IMPROVE READING COMPREHENSION WITH PUPIL EXERCISES.

(E) PROVIDES AT LEAST 4, AND UP TO 9, STUDENT‑SELECTED NEW BOOKS TO READ AND KEEP.

(F) COLLECTS, ANALYZES, AND REPORTS DETAILED DATA ON PARENTAL ENGAGEMENT, BOOKS READ, AND SPRING‑TO‑FALL READING SCORES.

(G) FOLLOWS THE DEPARTMENT’S TOP 10 IN 10 GOALS AND STRATEGIES, WITH AN EMPHASIS ON GOALS 4 AND 5.

(H) FOCUSES ON IN‑HOME PROGRAM DELIVERY THROUGH WEEKLY MAILINGS.

(I) PROVIDES SUMMARY DATA TO THE LEGISLATURE AND TO THE DEPARTMENT FOR ALL PUPILS SERVED BY THE PROGRAM AFTER EACH SUMMER.

SEC. 35B. (1) FROM THE FUNDS APPROPRIATED IN SECTION 11, THERE IS ALLOCATED FOR 2018‑2019 AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $250,000.00 FOR A GRANT TO BE DISTRIBUTED BY THE DEPARTMENT TO AN ELIGIBLE DISTRICT TO CREATE A PILOT PROGRAM TO USE A MULTISENSORY STRUCTURED LANGUAGE EDUCATION METHOD TO IMPROVE READING PROFICIENCY RATES AND TO COMPLY WITH SECTION 1280F OF THE REVISED SCHOOL CODE, MCL 380.1280F.

(2) A DISTRICT IS ELIGIBLE FOR A GRANT UNDER THIS SECTION IF ALL OF THE FOLLOWING ARE MET:

(A) A DYSLEXIA CENTER ACCREDITED BY THE INTERNATIONAL MULTISENSORY STRUCTURED LANGUAGE EDUCATION COUNCIL IS LOCATED IN THE DISTRICT.

(B) THE DISTRICT PARTNERS WITH THE DYSLEXIA CENTER DESCRIBED IN SUBDIVISION (A) TO PROVIDE MULTISENSORY STRUCTURED LANGUAGE EDUCATION FOR PUPILS IN GRADES K TO 3 IDENTIFIED AS HAVING AN EARLY LITERACY DELAY OR READING DEFICIENCY.

(C) THE DISTRICT HAS A PUPIL MEMBERSHIP GREATER THAN 7,000 AND LESS THAN 8,000.

(3) A DISTRICT MAY EXPEND GRANT FUNDS AWARDED UNDER THIS SECTION, IN COLLABORATION WITH THE DYSLEXIA CENTER DESCRIBED IN SUBSECTION (2)(A), FOR THE FOLLOWING PURPOSES:

(A) PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT INCLUDING TRAINING STAFF AND TUTORS IN THE MULTISENSORY, SEQUENTIAL, SYSTEMATIC EDUCATION APPROACH USED BY THE DYSLEXIA CENTER.

(B) ADDITIONAL INSTRUCTIONAL TIME BEFORE, DURING, OR AFTER SCHOOL FOR PUPILS IN GRADES K TO 3 IDENTIFIED AS HAVING AN EARLY LITERACY DELAY OR READING DEFICIENCY USING THE MULTISENSORY, SEQUENTIAL, SYSTEMATIC EDUCATION APPROACH USED BY THE DYSLEXIA CENTER.

(4) NOT LATER THAN DECEMBER 1, 2020, A DISTRICT THAT RECEIVES GRANT FUNDS UNDER THIS SECTION SHALL REPORT TO THE HOUSE AND SENATE APPROPRIATIONS SUBCOMMITTEES ON SCHOOL AID, THE HOUSE AND SENATE FISCAL AGENCIES, AND THE STATE BUDGET DIRECTOR ON ALL OF THE FOLLOWING FOR THE GRANT FUNDS AWARDED UNDER THIS SECTION:

(A) THE NUMBER OF STAFF AND TUTORS TRAINED.

(B) THE NUMBER OF PUPILS IN GRADES K TO 3 IDENTIFIED AS HAVING AN EARLY LITERACY DELAY OR READING DEFICIENCY SERVED.

(C) THE NUMBER OF HOURS OF ADDED INSTRUCTIONAL TIME PROVIDED TO PUPILS SERVED.

(D) PUPIL READING PROFICIENCY AND GROWTH DATA OF PUPILS SERVED NECESSARY TO EVALUATE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THE PROGRAM.

Sec. 39. (1) An eligible applicant receiving funds under section 32d shall submit an application, in a form and manner prescribed by the department, by a date specified by the department in the immediately preceding state fiscal year. THE APPLICATION SHALL NOT REQUIRE AN ELIGIBLE APPLICANT TO AMEND THE APPLICANT’S CURRENT ACCOUNTING CYCLE OR ADOPT THIS STATE’S FISCAL YEAR ACCOUNTING CYCLE IN ACCOUNTING FOR FINANCIAL TRANSACTIONS UNDER THIS SECTION. The application shall include all of the following:

(a) For 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 calculations, the estimated total number of children in the community who meet the criteria of section 32d, as provided to the applicant by the department utilizing the most recent population data available from the American community survey COMMUNITY SURVEY conducted by the United States Census Bureau. Beginning in 2018‑2019, the department shall ensure that it provides updated American community survey COMMUNITY SURVEY population data at least once every 3 years.

(b) The estimated number of children in the community who meet the criteria of section 32d and are being served exclusively by Head Start programs operating in the community.

(c) The number of children whom the applicant has the capacity to serve who meet the criteria of section 32d including a verification of physical facility and staff resources capacity.

(2) After notification of funding allocations, an applicant receiving funds under section 32d shall also submit an implementation plan for approval, in a form and manner prescribed by the department, by a date specified by the department, that details how the applicant complies with the program components established by the department pursuant to section 32d.

(3) The initial allocation to each eligible applicant under section 32d shall be the lesser of the following:

(a) The sum of the number of children served in a school‑day program in the preceding school year multiplied by $7,250.00 and the number of children served in a GSRP/Head Start blended program or a part‑day program in the preceding school year multiplied by $3,625.00.

(b) The sum of the number of children the applicant has the capacity to serve in 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 in a school‑day program multiplied by $7,250.00 and the number of children served in a GSRP/Head Start blended program or a part‑day program the applicant has the capacity to serve in 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 multiplied by $3,625.00.

(4) If funds remain after the allocations under subsection (3), the department shall distribute the remaining funds to each intermediate district or consortium of intermediate districts that serves less than the state percentage benchmark determined under subsection (5). These remaining funds shall be distributed to each eligible applicant based upon each applicant’s proportionate share of the remaining unserved children necessary to meet the statewide percentage benchmark in intermediate districts or consortia of intermediate districts serving less than the statewide percentage benchmark. When all applicants have been given the opportunity to reach the statewide percentage benchmark, the statewide percentage benchmark may be reset, as determined by the department, until greater equity of opportunity to serve eligible children across all intermediate school districts has been achieved.

(5) For the purposes of subsection (4), for the 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 program year, the department shall calculate a percentage of children served by each intermediate district or consortium of intermediate districts by dividing the number of children served in the immediately preceding year by that intermediate district or consortium by the total number of children within the intermediate district or consortium of intermediate districts who meet the criteria of section 32d as determined by the department utilizing the most recent population data available from the American community survey COMMUNITY SURVEY conducted by the United States Census Bureau. The department shall compare the resulting percentage of eligible children served to a statewide percentage benchmark to determine if the intermediate district or consortium is eligible for additional funds under subsection (4). For 2017‑2018, 2018‑2019, the statewide percentage benchmark is 60%.

(6) If, taking into account the total amount to be allocated to the applicant as calculated under this section, an applicant determines that it is able to include additional eligible children in the great start readiness program without additional funds under section 32d, the applicant may include additional eligible children but shall not receive additional funding under section 32d for those children.

(7) The department shall review the program components under section 32d and under this section at least biennially. The department also shall convene a committee of internal and external stakeholders at least once every 5 years to ensure that the funding structure under this section reflects current system needs under section 32d.

(8) As used in this section, “school‑day program”, “GSRP/Head Start blended program”, and “part‑day program” mean those terms as defined in section 32d.

Sec. 39a. (1) From the federal funds appropriated in section 11, there is allocated each fiscal year for 2016‑2017 and for 2017‑2018 FOR 2018‑2019 to districts, intermediate districts, and other eligible entities all available federal funding, estimated at $744,039,900.00 for 2016‑2017 and $731,600,000.00 for 2017‑2018 $730,600,000.00 for the federal programs under the no child left behind act of 2001, Public Law 107‑110, or the every student succeeds act, Public Law 114‑95. These funds are allocated as follows:

(a) An amount estimated at $1,200,000.00 each fiscal year FOR 2018‑2019 to provide students with drug‑ and violence‑prevention programs and to implement strategies to improve school safety, funded from DED‑OESE, drug‑free schools and communities funds.

(b) An amount estimated at $111,111,900.00 for 2016‑2017 and $100,000,000.00 for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for the purpose of preparing, training, and recruiting high‑quality teachers and class size reduction, funded from DED‑OESE, improving teacher quality funds.

(c) An amount estimated at $12,200,000.00 for 2016‑2017 and $11,000,000.00 for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for programs to teach English to limited English proficient (LEP) children, funded from DED‑OESE, language acquisition state grant funds.

(d) An amount estimated at $250,000.00 for 2016‑2017 only for the Michigan charter school subgrant program, funded from DED‑OESE, charter school funds.

(D) (e) An amount estimated at $3,000,000.00 for 2016‑2017 and $2,800,000.00 for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for rural and low income schools, funded from DED‑OESE, rural and low income school funds.

(E) (f) An amount estimated at $535,000,000.00 each fiscal year FOR 2018‑2019 to provide supplemental programs to enable educationally disadvantaged children to meet challenging academic standards, funded from DED‑OESE, title I, disadvantaged children funds.

(F) (g) An amount estimated at $8,878,000.00 for 2016‑2017 and $9,200,000.00 for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for the purpose of identifying and serving migrant children, funded from DED‑OESE, title I, migrant education funds.

(G) (h) An amount estimated at $39,000,000.00 each fiscal year FOR 2018‑2019 for the purpose of providing high‑quality extended learning opportunities, after school and during the summer, for children in low‑performing schools, funded from DED‑OESE, twenty‑first century community learning center funds.

(H) (i) An amount estimated at $18,000,000.00 each fiscal year $12,000,000.00 FOR 2018‑2019 to help support local school improvement efforts, funded from DED‑OESE, title I, local school improvement grants.

(I) (j) An amount estimated at $15,400,000.00 each fiscal year FOR 2018‑2019 to improve the academic achievement of students, funded from DED‑OESE, title IV, student support and academic enrichment grants.

(J) AN AMOUNT ESTIMATED AT $5,000,000.00 FOR 2018‑2019 FOR THE REMAINING BALANCE OF THE AMOUNT APPROPRIATED UNDER THE FORMER SECTION 32R, FOR FEDERAL FUNDING AWARDED TO THIS STATE UNDER SECTIONS 14005, 14006, AND 14013 OF TITLE XIV OF THE AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT OF 2009, PUBLIC LAW 111‑5, FOR THE RACE TO THE TOP EARLY LEARNING CHALLENGE GRANT.

(2) From the federal funds appropriated in section 11, there is allocated for 2016‑2017 and for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 to districts, intermediate districts, and other eligible entities all available federal funding, estimated at $30,800,000.00 for 2016‑2017 and $30,000,000.00 for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for the following programs that are funded by federal grants:

(a) An amount estimated at $200,000.00 for 2016‑2017 and $100,000.00 for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome education grants, funded from HHS – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, AIDS funding.

(b) An amount estimated at $2,600,000.00 for 2016‑2017 and $1,900,000.00 for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 to provide services to homeless children and youth, funded from DED‑OVAE, homeless children and youth funds.

(c) An amount estimated at $4,000,000.00 each fiscal year FOR 2018‑2019 to provide mental health, substance abuse, or violence prevention services to students, funded from HHS‑SAMHSA.

(d) An amount estimated at $24,000,000.00 each fiscal year FOR 2018‑2019 for providing career and technical education services to pupils, funded from DED‑OVAE, basic grants to states.

(3) All federal funds allocated under this section shall be distributed in accordance with federal law and with flexibility provisions outlined in Public Law 107‑116, and in the education flexibility partnership act of 1999, Public Law 106‑25. Notwithstanding section 17b, payments of federal funds to districts, intermediate districts, and other eligible entities under this section shall be paid on a schedule determined by the department.

(4) For the purposes of applying for federal grants appropriated under this article, the department shall allow an intermediate district to submit a consortium application on behalf of 2 or more districts with the agreement of those districts as appropriate according to federal rules and guidelines.

(5) For the purposes of funding federal title I grants under this article, in addition to any other federal grants for which a strict discipline academy is eligible, the department shall allocate to strict discipline academies out of title I, part A funds equal to what a strict discipline academy would have received if included and calculated under title I, part D, or what it would receive under the formula allocation under title I, part A, whichever is greater.

(6) As used in this section:

(a) “DED” means the United States Department of Education.

(b) “DED‑OESE” means the DED Office of Elementary and Secondary Education.

(c) “DED‑OVAE” means the DED Office of Vocational and Adult Education.

(d) “HHS” means the United States Department of Health and Human Services.

(e) “HHS‑SAMHSA” means the HHS Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

Sec. 41. (1) For a district or public school academy to be eligible to receive funding under this section, the district or public school academy must administer to English language learners the English language proficiency assessment known as the “WIDA ACCESS for English language learners” or the “WIDA Alternate ACCESS”. From the appropriation in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $6,000,000.00 for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for payments to eligible districts and eligible public school academies for services for English language learners who have been administered the WIDA ACCESS for English language learners.

(2) Funding allocated under this section shall be distributed to eligible districts and eligible public school academies based on the number of full‑time equivalent English language learners as follows:

(a) $620.00 per full‑time equivalent English language learner who has been assessed under the WIDA ACCESS for English language learners or the WIDA Alternate ACCESS with a WIDA ACCESS or WIDA Alternate ACCESS composite score between 1.0 and 1.9, or less, as applicable to each assessment.

(b) $410.00 per full‑time equivalent English language learner who has been assessed under the WIDA ACCESS for English language learners or the WIDA Alternate ACCESS with a WIDA ACCESS or WIDA Alternate ACCESS composite score between 2.0 and 2.9, or less, as applicable to each assessment.

(3) If funds allocated under this section are insufficient to fully fund the payments as prescribed under subsection (2), payments shall be prorated on an equal percentage basis, with the same percentage proration applied to both funding categories.

(4) Each district or public school academy receiving funds under this section shall submit to the department by July 15 of each fiscal year a report, not to exceed 10 pages, on the usage by the district or public school academy of funds under this section, in a form and manner determined by the department, which shall include a brief description of each program conducted or services performed by the district or public school academy using funds under this section and the amount of funds under this section allocated to each of those programs or services. If a district or public school academy does not comply with this section, the department shall withhold an amount equal to the August payment due under this section until the district or public school academy complies with this subsection. If the district or public school academy does not comply with this section by the end of the state fiscal year, the withheld funds shall be forfeited to the school aid fund.

(5) In order to receive funds under this section, a district or public school academy shall allow access for the department or the department’s designee to audit all records related to the program for which it receives those funds. The district or public school academy shall reimburse this state for all disallowances found in the audit.

(6) Beginning July 1, 2020, and every 3 years thereafter, the department shall review the per‑pupil distribution under subsection (2), to ensure that funding levels are appropriate and make recommendations for adjustments to the members of the senate and house subcommittees on K‑12 school aid appropriations.

Sec. 51a. (1) From the appropriation in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $941,946,100.00 for 2016‑2017 and there is allocated an amount not to exceed $956,246,100.00 $960,446,100.00 for 2017‑2018 AND THERE IS ALLOCATED AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $983,196,100.00 FOR 2018‑2019 from state sources and all available federal funding under sections 611 to 619 of part B of the individuals with disabilities education act, 20 USC 1411 to 1419, estimated at $370,000,000.00 each fiscal year for 2016‑2017 and for 2017‑2018 AND FOR 2018‑2019, plus any carryover federal funds from previous year appropriations. In addition, from the general fund appropriation in section 11, there is allocated to the department an amount not to exceed $500,000.00 for EACH FISCAL YEAR FOR 2017‑2018 AND FOR 2018‑2019 for the purpose of subsection (16). The allocations under this subsection are for the purpose of reimbursing districts and intermediate districts for special education programs, services, and special education personnel as prescribed in article 3 of the revised school code, MCL 380.1701 to 380.1766; 380.1761; net tuition payments made by intermediate districts to the Michigan Schools for the Deaf and Blind; and special education programs and services for pupils who are eligible for special education programs and services according to statute or rule. For meeting the costs of special education programs and services not reimbursed under this article, a district or intermediate district may use money in general funds or special education funds, not otherwise restricted, or contributions from districts to intermediate districts, tuition payments, gifts and contributions from individuals or other entities, or federal funds that may be available for this purpose, as determined by the intermediate district plan prepared pursuant to article 3 of the revised school code, MCL 380.1701 to 380.1766. 380.1761. Notwithstanding section 17b, payments of federal funds to districts, intermediate districts, and other eligible entities under this section shall be paid on a schedule determined by the department.

(2) From the funds allocated under subsection (1), there is allocated the amount necessary, and estimated at $260,700,000.00 for 2016‑2017 and estimated at $264,200,000.00 $266,900,000.00 for 2017‑2018 AND ESTIMATED AT $273,100,000.00 FOR 2018‑2019, for payments toward reimbursing districts and intermediate districts for 28.6138% of total approved costs of special education, excluding costs reimbursed under section 53a, and 70.4165% of total approved costs of special education transportation. Allocations under this subsection shall be made as follows:

(a) The initial amount allocated to a district under this subsection toward fulfilling the specified percentages shall be calculated by multiplying the district’s special education pupil membership, excluding pupils described in subsection (11), times the foundation allowance under section 20 of the pupil’s district of residence plus the amount of the district’s per‑pupil allocation under section 20m, not to exceed the basic foundation allowance under section 20 for the current fiscal year, or, for a special education pupil in membership in a district that is a public school academy, times an amount equal to the amount per membership pupil calculated under section 20(6). For an intermediate district, the amount allocated under this subdivision toward fulfilling the specified percentages shall be an amount per special education membership pupil, excluding pupils described in subsection (11), and shall be calculated in the same manner as for a district, using the foundation allowance under section 20 of the pupil’s district of residence, not to exceed the basic foundation allowance under section 20 for the current fiscal year, and that district’s per‑pupil allocation under section 20m.

(b) After the allocations under subdivision (a), districts and intermediate districts for which the payments calculated under subdivision (a) do not fulfill the specified percentages shall be paid the amount necessary to achieve the specified percentages for the district or intermediate district.

(3) From the funds allocated under subsection (1), there is allocated each fiscal year for 2016‑2017 and for 2017‑2018 an amount not to exceed $1,000,000.00 $1,300,000.00 AND THERE IS ALLOCATED AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $1,300,000.00 FOR 2018‑2019 to make payments to districts and intermediate districts under this subsection. If the amount allocated to a district or intermediate district for a fiscal year under subsection (2)(b) is less than the sum of the amounts allocated to the district or intermediate district for 1996‑97 under sections 52 and 58, there is allocated to the district or intermediate district for the fiscal year an amount equal to that difference, adjusted by applying the same proration factor that was used in the distribution of funds under section 52 in 1996‑97 as adjusted to the district’s or intermediate district’s necessary costs of special education used in calculations for the fiscal year. This adjustment is to reflect reductions in special education program operations or services between 1996‑97 and subsequent fiscal years. Adjustments for reductions in special education program operations or services shall be made in a manner determined by the department and shall include adjustments for program or service shifts.

(4) If the department determines that the sum of the amounts allocated for a fiscal year to a district or intermediate district under subsection (2)(a) and (b) is not sufficient to fulfill the specified percentages in subsection (2), then the shortfall shall be paid to the district or intermediate district during the fiscal year beginning on the October 1 following the determination and payments under subsection (3) shall be adjusted as necessary. If the department determines that the sum of the amounts allocated for a fiscal year to a district or intermediate district under subsection (2)(a) and (b) exceeds the sum of the amount necessary to fulfill the specified percentages in subsection (2), then the department shall deduct the amount of the excess from the district’s or intermediate district’s payments under this article for the fiscal year beginning on the October 1 following the determination and payments under subsection (3) shall be adjusted as necessary. However, if the amount allocated under subsection (2)(a) in itself exceeds the amount necessary to fulfill the specified percentages in subsection (2), there shall be no deduction under this subsection.

(5) State funds shall be allocated on a total approved cost basis. Federal funds shall be allocated under applicable federal requirements, except that an amount not to exceed $3,500,000.00 may be allocated by the department each fiscal year for 2016‑2017 and for 2017‑2018 AND FOR 2018‑2019 to districts, intermediate districts, or other eligible entities on a competitive grant basis for programs, equipment, and services that the department determines to be designed to benefit or improve special education on a statewide scale.

(6) From the amount allocated in subsection (1), there is allocated an amount not to exceed $2,200,000.00 each fiscal year for 2016‑2017 and for 2017‑2018 AND FOR 2018‑2019 to reimburse 100% of the net increase in necessary costs incurred by a district or intermediate district in implementing the revisions in the administrative rules for special education that became effective on July 1, 1987. As used in this subsection, “net increase in necessary costs” means the necessary additional costs incurred solely because of new or revised requirements in the administrative rules minus cost savings permitted in implementing the revised rules. Net increase in necessary costs shall be determined in a manner specified by the department.

(7) For purposes of sections 51a to 58, all of the following apply:

(a) “Total approved costs of special education” shall be determined in a manner specified by the department and may include indirect costs, but shall not exceed 115% of approved direct costs for section 52 and section 53a programs. The total approved costs include salary and other compensation for all approved special education personnel for the program, including payments for social security and Medicare and public school employee retirement system contributions. The total approved costs do not include salaries or other compensation paid to administrative personnel who are not special education personnel as defined in section 6 of the revised school code, MCL 380.6. Costs reimbursed by federal funds, other than those federal funds included in the allocation made under this article, are not included. Special education approved personnel not utilized full time in the evaluation of students or in the delivery of special education programs, ancillary, and other related services shall be reimbursed under this section only for that portion of time actually spent providing these programs and services, with the exception of special education programs and services provided to youth placed in child caring institutions or juvenile detention programs approved by the department to provide an on‑grounds education program.

(b) Beginning with the 2004‑2005 fiscal year, a district or intermediate district that employed special education support services staff to provide special education support services in 2003‑2004 or in a subsequent fiscal year and that in a fiscal year after 2003‑2004 receives the same type of support services from another district or intermediate district shall report the cost of those support services for special education reimbursement purposes under this article. This subdivision does not prohibit the transfer of special education classroom teachers and special education classroom aides if the pupils counted in membership associated with those special education classroom teachers and special education classroom aides are transferred and counted in membership in the other district or intermediate district in conjunction with the transfer of those teachers and aides.

(c) If the department determines before bookclosing for a fiscal year that the amounts allocated for that fiscal year under subsections (2), (3), (6), and (11) and sections 53a, 54, and 56 will exceed expenditures for that fiscal year under subsections (2), (3), (6), and (11) and sections 53a, 54, and 56, then for a district or intermediate district whose reimbursement for that fiscal year would otherwise be affected by subdivision (b), subdivision (b) does not apply to the calculation of the reimbursement for that district or intermediate district and reimbursement for that district or intermediate district shall be calculated in the same manner as it was for 2003‑2004. If the amount of the excess allocations under subsections (2), (3), (6), and (11) and sections 53a, 54, and 56 is not sufficient to fully fund the calculation of reimbursement to those districts and intermediate districts under this subdivision, then the calculations and resulting reimbursement under this subdivision shall be prorated on an equal percentage basis. Beginning in 2015‑2016, the amount of reimbursement under this subdivision for a fiscal year shall not exceed $2,000,000.00 for any district or intermediate district.

(d) Reimbursement for ancillary and other related services, as defined by R 340.1701c of the Michigan Administrative Code, shall not be provided when those services are covered by and available through private group health insurance carriers or federal reimbursed program sources unless the department and district or intermediate district agree otherwise and that agreement is approved by the state budget director. Expenses, other than the incidental expense of filing, shall not be borne by the parent. In addition, the filing of claims shall not delay the education of a pupil. A district or intermediate district shall be responsible for payment of a deductible amount and for an advance payment required until the time a claim is paid.

(e) Beginning with calculations for 2004‑2005, if an intermediate district purchases a special education pupil transportation service from a constituent district that was previously purchased from a private entity; if the purchase from the constituent district is at a lower cost, adjusted for changes in fuel costs; and if the cost shift from the intermediate district to the constituent does not result in any net change in the revenue the constituent district receives from payments under sections 22b and 51c, then upon application by the intermediate district, the department shall direct the intermediate district to continue to report the cost associated with the specific identified special education pupil transportation service and shall adjust the costs reported by the constituent district to remove the cost associated with that specific service.

(8) A pupil who is enrolled in a full‑time special education program conducted or administered by an intermediate district or a pupil who is enrolled in the Michigan schools for the deaf and blind shall not be included in the membership count of a district, but shall be counted in membership in the intermediate district of residence.

(9) Special education personnel transferred from 1 district to another to implement the revised school code shall be entitled to the rights, benefits, and tenure to which the person would otherwise be entitled had that person been employed by the receiving district originally.

(10) If a district or intermediate district uses money received under this section for a purpose other than the purpose or purposes for which the money is allocated, the department may require the district or intermediate district to refund the amount of money received. Money that is refunded shall be deposited in the state treasury to the credit of the state school aid fund.

(11) From the funds allocated in subsection (1), there is allocated the amount necessary, estimated at $3,500,000.00 for 2016‑2017, and estimated at $3,600,000.00 $3,200,000.00 for 2017‑2018, AND ESTIMATED AT $3,400,000.00 FOR 2018‑2019, to pay the foundation allowances for pupils described in this subsection. The allocation to a district under this subsection shall be calculated by multiplying the number of pupils described in this subsection who are counted in membership in the district times the sum of the foundation allowance under section 20 of the pupil’s district of residence plus the amount of the district’s per‑pupil allocation under section 20m, not to exceed the basic foundation allowance under section 20 for the current fiscal year, or, for a pupil described in this subsection who is counted in membership in a district that is a public school academy, times an amount equal to the amount per membership pupil under section 20(6) or, for a pupil described in this subsection who is counted in membership in the education achievement system, times an amount equal to the amount per membership pupil under section 20(7). The allocation to an intermediate district under this subsection shall be calculated in the same manner as for a district, using the foundation allowance under section 20 of the pupil’s district of residence, not to exceed the basic foundation allowance under section 20 for the current fiscal year, and that district’s per‑pupil allocation under section 20m. This subsection applies to all of the following pupils:

(a) Pupils described in section 53a.

(b) Pupils counted in membership in an intermediate district who are not special education pupils and are served by the intermediate district in a juvenile detention or child caring facility.

(c) Pupils with an emotional impairment counted in membership by an intermediate district and provided educational services by the department of health and human services.

(12) If it is determined that funds allocated under subsection (2) or (11) or under section 51c will not be expended, funds up to the amount necessary and available may be used to supplement the allocations under subsection (2) or (11) or under section 51c in order to fully fund those allocations. After payments under subsections (2) and (11) and section 51c, the remaining expenditures from the allocation in subsection (1) shall be made in the following order:

(a) 100% of the reimbursement required under section 53a.

(b) 100% of the reimbursement required under subsection (6).

(c) 100% of the payment required under section 54.

(d) 100% of the payment required under subsection (3).

(e) 100% of the payments under section 56.

(13) The allocations under subsections (2), (3), and (11) shall be allocations to intermediate districts only and shall not be allocations to districts, but instead shall be calculations used only to determine the state payments under section 22b.

(14) If a public school academy that is not a cyber school, as defined in section 551 of the revised school code, MCL 380.551, enrolls under this section a pupil who resides outside of the intermediate district in which the public school academy is located and who is eligible for special education programs and services according to statute or rule, or who is a child with disabilities, as defined under the individuals with disabilities education act, Public Law 108‑446, the intermediate district in which the public school academy is located and the public school academy shall enter into a written agreement with the intermediate district in which the pupil resides for the purpose of providing the pupil with a free appropriate public education, and the written agreement shall include at least an agreement on the responsibility for the payment of the added costs of special education programs and services for the pupil. If the public school academy that enrolls the pupil does not enter into an agreement under this subsection, the public school academy shall not charge the pupil’s resident intermediate district or the intermediate district in which the public school academy is located the added costs of special education programs and services for the pupil, and the public school academy is not eligible for any payouts based on the funding formula outlined in the resident or nonresident intermediate district’s plan. If a pupil is not enrolled in a public school academy under this subsection, the provision of special education programs and services and the payment of the added costs of special education programs and services for a pupil described in this subsection are the responsibility of the district and intermediate district in which the pupil resides.

(15) For the purpose of receiving its federal allocation under part B of the individuals with disabilities education act, Public Law 108‑446, a public school academy that is a cyber school, as defined in section 551 of the revised school code, MCL 380.551, and is in compliance with section 553a of the revised school code, MCL 380.553a, shall directly receive the federal allocation under part B of the individuals with disabilities education act, Public Law 108‑446, from the intermediate district in which the cyber school is located, as the subrecipient. If the intermediate district does not distribute the funds described in this subsection to the cyber school by the part B application due date of July 1, the department may distribute the funds described in this subsection directly to the cyber school according to the formula prescribed in 34 CFR 300.705 and 34 CFR 300.816.

(16) For a public school academy that is a cyber school, as defined in section 551 of the revised school code, MCL 380.551, and is in compliance with section 553a of the revised school code, MCL 380.553a, that enrolls a pupil under this section, the intermediate district in which the cyber school is located shall ensure that the cyber school complies with sections 1701a, 1703, 1704, 1751, 1752, 1756, and 1757 of the revised school code, MCL 380.1701a, 380.1703, 380.1704, 380.1751, 380.1752, 380.1756, and 380.1757; applicable rules; and the individuals with disabilities education act, Public Law 108‑446. From the general fund appropriation under subsection (1), the department shall provide appropriate administrative funding to the intermediate district in which that cyber school is located for the purpose of ensuring that compliance.

(17) For the purposes of this section, the department or the center shall only require a district or intermediate district to report information that is not already available from the financial information database maintained by the center.

Sec. 51c. As required by the court in the consolidated cases known as Durant v State of Michigan, Durant v State of Michigan, 456 Mich 175 (1997), from the allocation under section 51a(1), there is allocated each fiscal year for 2016‑2017 and for 2017‑2018 AND FOR 2018‑2019 the amount necessary, estimated at $624,600,000.00 for 2016‑2017 and $635,300,000.00 $636,900,000.00 for 2017‑2018 AND $651,000,000.00 FOR 2018‑2019, for payments to reimburse districts for 28.6138% of total approved costs of special education excluding costs reimbursed under section 53a, and 70.4165% of total approved costs of special education transportation. Funds allocated under this section that are not expended in the state fiscal year for which they were allocated, as determined by the department, may be used to supplement the allocations under sections 22a and 22b in order to fully fund those calculated allocations for the same fiscal year.

Sec. 51d. (1) From the federal funds appropriated in section 11, there is allocated each fiscal year for 2016‑2017 and for 2017‑2018, FOR 2018‑2019 all available federal funding, estimated at $61,000,000.00, each fiscal year, for special education programs and services that are funded by federal grants. All federal funds allocated under this section shall be distributed in accordance with federal law. Notwithstanding section 17b, payments of federal funds to districts, intermediate districts, and other eligible entities under this section shall be paid on a schedule determined by the department.

(2) From the federal funds allocated under subsection (1), the following amounts are allocated each fiscal year for 2016‑2017 and for 2017‑2018:FOR 2018‑2019:

(a) An amount estimated at $14,000,000.00 each fiscal year for handicapped infants and toddlers, funded from DED‑OSERS, handicapped infants and toddlers funds.

(b) An amount estimated at $12,000,000.00 each fiscal year for preschool grants (Public Law 94‑142), funded from DED‑OSERS, handicapped preschool incentive funds.

(c) An amount estimated at $35,000,000.00 each fiscal year for special education programs funded by DED‑OSERS, handicapped program, individuals with disabilities act funds.

(3) As used in this section, “DED‑OSERS” means the United States Department of Education Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services.

Sec. 53a. (1) For districts, reimbursement for pupils described in subsection (2) shall be 100% of the total approved costs of operating special education programs and services approved by the department and included in the intermediate district plan adopted pursuant to article 3 of the revised school code, MCL 380.1701 to 380.1766, 380.1761, minus the district’s foundation allowance calculated under section 20 and minus the district’s per‑pupil allocation under section 20m. For intermediate districts, reimbursement for pupils described in subsection (2) shall be calculated in the same manner as for a district, using the foundation allowance under section 20 of the pupil’s district of residence, not to exceed the basic foundation allowance under section 20 for the current fiscal year, and that district’s per‑pupil allocation under section 20m.

(2) Reimbursement under subsection (1) is for the following special education pupils:

(a) Pupils assigned to a district or intermediate district through the community placement program of the courts or a state agency, if the pupil was a resident of another intermediate district at the time the pupil came under the jurisdiction of the court or a state agency.

(b) Pupils who are residents of institutions operated by the department of health and human services.

(c) Pupils who are former residents of department of community health institutions for the developmentally disabled who are placed in community settings other than the pupil’s home.

(d) Pupils enrolled in a department‑approved on‑grounds educational program longer than 180 days, but not longer than 233 days, at a residential child care institution, if the child care institution offered in 1991‑92 an on‑grounds educational program longer than 180 days but not longer than 233 days.

(e) Pupils placed in a district by a parent for the purpose of seeking a suitable home, if the parent does not reside in the same intermediate district as the district in which the pupil is placed.

(3) Only those costs that are clearly and directly attributable to educational programs for pupils described in subsection (2), and that would not have been incurred if the pupils were not being educated in a district or intermediate district, are reimbursable under this section.

(4) The costs of transportation shall be funded under this section and shall not be reimbursed under section 58.

(5) Not more than $10,500,000.00 of the allocation for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 in section 51a(1) shall be allocated under this section.

Sec. 54. Each intermediate district shall receive an amount per‑pupil for each pupil in attendance at the Michigan schools for the deaf and blind. The amount shall be proportionate to the total instructional cost at each school. Not more than $1,688,000.00 of the allocation for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 in section 51a(1) shall be allocated under this section.

Sec. 54b. (1) From the general fund appropriation in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $1,600,000.00 for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 to continue the implementation of the recommendations of the special education reform task force published in January 2016.

(2) Except as provided in subsection (3), the THE department shall use funds allocated under this section for the purpose of piloting statewide implementation of the Michigan Integrated Behavior and Learning Support Initiative (MiBLSI), a nationally recognized program that includes positive behavioral intervention and supports and provides a statewide structure to support local initiatives for an integrated behavior and reading program. With the assistance of the intermediate districts involved in MiBLSI, the department shall identify a number of intermediate districts to participate in the pilot that is sufficient to ensure that MiBLSI can be implemented statewide with fidelity and sustainability. In addition, the department shall identify an intermediate district to act as a fiscal agent for these funds.

(3) In addition to the purpose under subsection (2), the department shall use funds allocated under this section for the purpose of providing training to intermediate districts and districts related to the safe implementation of emergency restraints and seclusion. The department shall develop and implement a training program that is based on the state board’s adopted standards and on any other legislation enacted by the legislature regarding the emergency use of seclusion and restraint.

SEC. 54D. (1) FROM THE APPROPRIATIONS IN SECTION 11, THERE IS ALLOCATED AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $5,000,000.00 FOR 2018‑2019 TO INTERMEDIATE DISTRICTS FOR THE PURPOSE OF PROVIDING STATE EARLY ON SERVICES PILOT PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN FROM BIRTH TO 3 YEARS OF AGE WITH A DEVELOPMENTAL DELAY OR A DISABILITY, OR BOTH, AND THEIR FAMILIES, AS DESCRIBED IN THE EARLY ON MICHIGAN STATE PLAN, AS APPROVED BY THE DEPARTMENT.

(2) TO BE ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE GRANT FUNDING UNDER THIS SECTION, EACH INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT SHALL APPLY IN A FORM AND MANNER DETERMINED BY THE DEPARTMENT.

(3) THE GRANT FUNDING ALLOCATED UNDER THIS SECTION SHALL BE USED TO INCREASE EARLY ON SERVICES AND RESOURCES AVAILABLE TO CHILDREN THAT DEMONSTRATE DEVELOPMENTAL DELAYS TO HELP PREPARE THEM FOR SUCCESS AS THEY ENTER SCHOOL. STATE EARLY ON SERVICES INCLUDE EVALUATING AND PROVIDING EARLY INTERVENTION SERVICES FOR ELIGIBLE INFANTS AND TODDLERS AND THEIR FAMILIES TO ADDRESS DEVELOPMENTAL DELAYS, INCLUDING THOSE AFFECTING PHYSICAL, COGNITIVE, COMMUNICATION, ADAPTIVE, SOCIAL, OR EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT. GRANT FUNDS MUST NOT BE USED TO SUPPLANT EXISTING SERVICES THAT ARE CURRENTLY BEING PROVIDED.

(4) THE FUNDS ALLOCATED UNDER SUBSECTION (1) SHALL BE DISTRIBUTED TO INTERMEDIATE DISTRICTS ACCORDING TO THE DEPARTMENT’S EARLY ON FUNDING FORMULA UTILIZED TO DISTRIBUTE THE FEDERAL AWARD TO MICHIGAN UNDER PART C OF THE INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES EDUCATION ACT. FUNDS RECEIVED UNDER THIS SECTION MUST NOT SUPPLANT EXISTING FUNDS OR RESOURCES ALLOCATED FOR EARLY ON EARLY INTERVENTION SERVICES. AN INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT RECEIVING FUNDS UNDER THIS SECTION SHALL MAXIMIZE THE CAPTURE OF MEDICAID FUNDS TO SUPPORT EARLY ON EARLY INTERVENTION SERVICES TO THE EXTENT POSSIBLE.

(5) EACH INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT THAT RECEIVES FUNDS UNDER THIS SECTION SHALL REPORT DATA AND OTHER INFORMATION TO THE DEPARTMENT IN A FORM, MANNER, AND FREQUENCY PRESCRIBED BY THE DEPARTMENT TO ALLOW FOR MONITORING AND EVALUATION OF THE PILOT PROJECTS AND TO ENSURE THAT THE CHILDREN DESCRIBED IN SUBSECTION (1) RECEIVED APPROPRIATE LEVELS AND TYPES OF SERVICES DELIVERED BY QUALIFIED PERSONNEL, BASED ON THE INDIVIDUAL NEEDS OF THE CHILDREN AND THEIR FAMILIES.

(6) NOTWITHSTANDING SECTION 17B, PAYMENTS UNDER THIS SECTION SHALL BE PAID ON A SCHEDULE DETERMINED BY THE DEPARTMENT.

Sec. 55. (1) From the GENERAL FUND money appropriated in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $150,000.00 for 2017‑2018 to Michigan State University, Department of Epidemiology, for a study of $250,000.00 FOR 2018‑2019 TO the Conductive Learning Center located at Aquinas College. This funding shall MUST be used to develop and implement an evaluation of the effectiveness of conductive education for children with cerebral palsy. The evaluation shall be multidimensional and shall include a control group of children with cerebral palsy not enrolled in conductive education. It should include an assessment of the motor system itself as well as the impact of conductive education on each of the following:

(a) The acquisition of skills permitting complex motor functions.

(b) The performance of tasks essential to daily living.

(c) The attitudes and feelings of both children and parents.

(d) The long‑term need for special education for children with cerebral palsy.

(2) This funding is for the third of 3 years of funding for this purpose.SUPPORT THE OPERATIONAL COSTS OF THE CONDUCTIVE EDUCATION MODEL TAUGHT AT THE CONDUCTIVE LEARNING CENTER TO MAXIMIZE THE INDEPENDENCE AND MOBILITY OF CHILDREN AND ADULTS WITH NEUROMOTOR DISABILITIES. THE CONDUCTIVE EDUCATION MODEL FUNDED UNDER THIS SECTION MUST BE BASED ON THE CONCEPT OF NEUROPLASTICITY AND THE ABILITY OF PEOPLE TO LEARN AND IMPROVE WHEN THEY ARE MOTIVATED, REGARDLESS OF THE SEVERITY OF THEIR DISABILITY.

(2) NOTWITHSTANDING SECTION 17B, THE DEPARTMENT SHALL DISTRIBUTE THE FUNDING ALLOCATED UNDER THIS SECTION TO THE CONDUCTIVE LEARNING CENTER NOT LATER THAN DECEMBER 1, 2018.

Sec. 56. (1) For the purposes of this section:

(a) “Membership” means for a particular fiscal year the total membership for the immediately preceding fiscal year of the intermediate district and the districts constituent to the intermediate district.

(b) “Millage levied” means the millage levied for special education pursuant to part 30 of the revised school code, MCL 380.1711 to 380.1743, 380.1741, including a levy for debt service obligations.

(c) “Taxable value” means the total taxable value of the districts constituent to an intermediate district, except that if a district has elected not to come under part 30 of the revised school code, MCL 380.1711 to 380.1743, 380.1741, membership and taxable value of the district shall not be included in the membership and taxable value of the intermediate district.

(2) From the allocation under section 51a(1), there is allocated an amount not to exceed $37,758,100.00 each fiscal year for 2016‑2017 and for 2017‑2018 AND AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $40,008,100.00 FOR 2018‑2019 to reimburse intermediate districts levying millages for special education pursuant to part 30 of the revised school code, MCL 380.1711 to 380.1743. 380.1741. The purpose, use, and expenditure of the reimbursement shall be limited as if the funds were generated by these millages and governed by the intermediate district plan adopted pursuant to article 3 of the revised school code, MCL 380.1701 to 380.1766. 380.1761. As a condition of receiving funds under this section, an intermediate district distributing any portion of special education millage funds to its constituent districts shall submit for departmental approval and implement a distribution plan.

(3) Reimbursement for those millages levied in 2015‑2016 shall be made in 2016‑2017 at an amount per 2015‑2016 membership pupil computed by subtracting from $180,900.00 the 2015‑2016 taxable value behind each membership pupil and multiplying the resulting difference by the 20152016 millage levied.

(3) (4) Reimbursement for those millages levied in 2016‑2017 shall be made in 2017‑2018 at an amount per 2016‑2017 membership pupil computed by subtracting from $183,200.00 $185,000.00 the 2016‑2017 taxable value behind each membership pupil and multiplying the resulting difference by the 2016‑2017 millage levied, and then subtracting from that amount the 2016‑2017 local community stabilization share revenue for special education purposes behind each membership pupil for reimbursement of personal property exemption loss under the local community stabilization authority act, 2014 PA 86, MCL 123.1341 to 123.1362.

(4) EXCEPT AS OTHERWISE PROVIDED IN THIS SUBSECTION, REIMBURSEMENT FOR THOSE MILLAGES LEVIED IN 2017‑2018 SHALL BE MADE IN 2018‑2019 AT AN AMOUNT PER 2017‑2018 MEMBERSHIP PUPIL COMPUTED BY SUBTRACTING FROM $193,700.00 THE 2017‑2018 TAXABLE VALUE BEHIND EACH MEMBERSHIP PUPIL AND MULTIPLYING THE RESULTING DIFFERENCE BY THE 2017‑2018 MILLAGE LEVIED, AND THEN SUBTRACTING FROM THAT AMOUNT THE 2017‑2018 LOCAL COMMUNITY STABILIZATION SHARE REVENUE FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION PURPOSES BEHIND EACH MEMBERSHIP PUPIL FOR REIMBURSEMENT OF PERSONAL PROPERTY EXEMPTION LOSS UNDER THE LOCAL COMMUNITY STABILIZATION AUTHORITY ACT, 2014 PA 86, MCL 123.1341 TO 123.1362. REIMBURSEMENT IN 2018‑2019 FOR AN INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT WHOSE 2017‑2018 ALLOCATION WAS AFFECTED BY THE OPERATION OF SUBSECTION (5) SHALL BE AN AMOUNT EQUAL TO 102.5% OF THE 2017‑2018 ALLOCATION TO THAT INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT.

(5) The amount paid to a single intermediate district under this section shall not exceed 62.9% of the total amount allocated under subsection (2).

(6) The amount paid to a single intermediate district under this section shall not be less than 75% of the amount allocated to the intermediate district under this section for the immediately preceding fiscal year.

Sec. 61a. (1) From the appropriation in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $36,611,300.00 for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 to reimburse on an added cost basis districts, except for a district that served as the fiscal agent for a vocational education consortium in the 1993‑94 school year and that has a foundation allowance as calculated under section 20 greater than the minimum foundation allowance under that section, and secondary area vocational‑technical education centers for secondary‑level career and technical education programs according to rules approved by the superintendent. Applications for participation in the programs shall be submitted in the form prescribed by the department. The department shall determine the added cost for each career and technical education program area. The allocation of added cost funds shall be prioritized based on the capital and program expenditures needed to operate the career and technical education programs provided; the number of pupils enrolled; the advancement of pupils through the instructional program; the existence of an articulation agreement with at least 1 postsecondary institution that provides pupils with opportunities to earn postsecondary credit during the pupil’s participation in the career and technical education program and transfers those credits to the postsecondary institution upon completion of the career and technical education program; and the program rank in student placement, job openings, and wages, and shall not exceed 75% of the added cost of any program. Notwithstanding any rule or department determination to the contrary, when determining a district’s allocation or the formula for making allocations under this section, the department shall include the participation of pupils in grade 9 in all of those determinations and in all portions of the formula. With the approval of the department, the board of a district maintaining a secondary career and technical education program may offer the program for the period from the close of the school year until September 1. The program shall use existing facilities and shall be operated as prescribed by rules promulgated by the superintendent.

(2) Except for a district that served as the fiscal agent for a vocational education consortium in the 1993‑94 school year, districts and intermediate districts shall be reimbursed for local career and technical education administration, shared time career and technical education administration, and career education planning district career and technical education administration. The definition of what constitutes administration and reimbursement shall be pursuant to guidelines adopted by the superintendent. Not more than $800,000.00 of the allocation in subsection (1) shall be distributed under this subsection.

(3) A career and technical education program funded under this section may provide an opportunity for participants who are eligible to be funded under section 107 to enroll in the career and technical education program funded under this section if the participation does not occur during regular school hours.

(4) In addition to the money allocated under subsections (1) , AND (5), and (6), from the general fund money appropriated in section 11, there is allocated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 an amount not to exceed $79,000.00 $100,000.00 to an eligible Michigan‑approved 501(c)(3) organization for the purposes of teaching or training restaurant management and culinary arts for career and professional development. The department shall oversee funds distributed to an eligible grantee under this section. As used in this subsection, “eligible Michigan‑approved 501(c)(3) organization” means an organization that is exempt from taxation under section 501(c)(3) of the internal revenue code of 1986, 26 USC 501, that provides the ProStart curriculum and training to state‑approved career and technical education programs with classification of instructional programs (CIP) codes in the 12.05xx category, and that administers national certification for the purpose of restaurant management and culinary arts for career and professional development.

(5) In addition to the funds allocated under subsections (1) , AND (4), and (6), from the funds appropriated in section 11, there is allocated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 an amount not to exceed $1,000,000.00 for competitive grants to intermediate districts to hire career and technical education counselors. All of the following apply to this funding:

(a) An intermediate district seeking a grant under this subsection shall apply to the department in a form and manner specified by the department.

(b) The department shall award grants under this subsection on a competitive basis to no more than 3 intermediate districts but shall give priority to the intermediate district that has the greatest number of pupils enrolled in its constituent districts and shall ensure that grants are equitably distributed to the various geographic areas of this state and to urban and rural areas.THAT RECEIVED FUNDING UNDER THIS SUBSECTION IN 2017‑2018.

(c) To be eligible for funding under this subsection, an intermediate district shall do all of the following:

(i) Catalog all available K‑12 and other workforce development programs and services, including job search, job training, pre‑employment certifications, career awareness programs, career and technical education programs, and other related programs and services offered by districts or intermediate districts, postsecondary institutions, and other private or public service organizations.

(ii) Develop an outreach program that educates students about career and technical education options and connects students to the services cataloged under subparagraph (i).

(iii) Track student placement and report on student placement to the house and senate appropriations subcommittees on school aid no later than June 30, 2018 2019 in the form and manner prescribed by the department.

(6) In addition to the funds allocated under subsections (1), (4), and (5), there is allocated an amount not to exceed $160,000.00 for 2017‑2018 to eligible districts under this subsection for the purpose of career and technical education counselors. To be eligible to receive funding under this subsection, an eligible district must be a constituent district of an intermediate district that is located in prosperity region 6 and borders prosperity regions 5, 7, and 9, and must have at least 1,600 pupils in membership in 2017‑2018. A grant to an eligible district under this subsection shall be $80,000.00.

Sec. 61b. (1) From the appropriation in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $8,000,000.00 each fiscal year for 2016‑2017 and 2017‑2018 AND FOR 2018‑2019 for CTE early/middle college and CTE dual enrollment programs authorized under this section and for planning grants for the development or expansion of CTE early/middle college programs. The purpose of these programs is to increase the number of Michigan residents with high‑quality degrees or credentials, and to increase the number of students who are college and career ready upon high school graduation.

(2) From the funds allocated under subsection (1), an amount as determined under this subsection shall be allocated to each intermediate district serving as a fiscal agent for state‑approved CTE early/middle college and CTE dual enrollment programs in each of the prosperity regions and subregions identified by the department. An intermediate district shall not use more than 5% of the funds allocated under this subsection for administrative costs for serving as the fiscal agent.

(3) To be an eligible fiscal agent, an intermediate district must agree to do all of the following in a form and manner determined by the department:

(a) Distribute funds to eligible CTE early/middle college and CTE dual enrollment programs in a prosperity region or subregion as described in this section.

(b) Collaborate with the talent district career council CAREER AND EDUCATIONAL ADVISORY COUNCIL that is located in the prosperity region or subregion to develop a regional strategic plan under subsection (4) that aligns CTE programs and services into an efficient and effective delivery system for high school students.

(c) Implement a regional process to rank career clusters in the prosperity region or subregion as described under subsection (4). Regional processes shall be approved by the department before the ranking of career clusters.

(d) Report CTE early/middle college and CTE dual enrollment program and student data and information as prescribed by the department AND THE CENTER.

(4) A regional strategic plan must be approved by the talent district career AND EDUCATIONAL ADVISORY council before submission to the department. A regional strategic plan shall include, but not be limited to, the following:

(a) An identification of regional employer need based on a ranking of all career clusters in the prosperity region or subregion ranked by 10‑year job openings projections and median wage for each standard occupational code in each career cluster as obtained from the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics. Standard occupational codes within high‑ranking clusters also may be further ranked by median wage. The rankings shall be reviewed by the talent district career AND EDUCATIONAL ADVISORY council located in the prosperity region or subregion and modified if necessary to accurately reflect employer demand for talent in the prosperity region or subregion. A talent district career AND EDUCATIONAL ADVISORY council shall document that it has conducted this review and certify that it is accurate. These career cluster rankings shall be determined and updated once every 4 years.

(b) An identification of educational entities in the prosperity region or subregion that will provide eligible CTE early/middle college and CTE dual enrollment programs including districts, intermediate districts, postsecondary institutions, and noncredit occupational training programs leading to an industry‑recognized credential.

(c) A strategy to inform parents and students of CTE early/middle college and CTE dual enrollment programs in the prosperity region or subregion.

(d) Any other requirements as defined by the department.

(5) An eligible CTE program is a program that meets all of the following:

(a) Has been identified in the highest 5 career cluster rankings in any of the 10 regional strategic plans jointly approved by the Michigan talent investment agency in the department of talent and economic development and the department.

(b) Has a coherent sequence of courses that will allow a student to earn a high school diploma and achieve at least 1 of the following in a specific career cluster:

(i) An associate degree.

(ii) An industry‑recognized technical certification approved by the Michigan talent investment agency in the department of talent and economic development.

(iii) Up to 60 transferable college credits.

(iv) Participation in a registered apprenticeship, PRE‑APPRENTICESHIP, OR APPRENTICE READINESS PROGRAM.

(c) Is aligned with the Michigan merit curriculum.

(d) Has an articulation agreement with at least 1 postsecondary institution that provides students with opportunities to receive postsecondary credits during the student’s participation in the CTE early/middle college or CTE dual enrollment program and transfers those credits to the postsecondary institution upon completion of the CTE early/middle college or CTE dual enrollment program.

(e) Provides instruction that is supervised, directed, or coordinated by an appropriately certificated CTE teacher or, for concurrent enrollment courses, a postsecondary faculty member.

(f) Provides for highly integrated student support services that include at least the following:

(i) Teachers as academic advisors.

(ii) Supervised course selection.

(iii) Monitoring of student progress and completion.

(iv) Career planning services provided by a local one‑stop service center as described in the Michigan works one‑stop service center system act, 2006 PA 491, MCL 408.111 to 408.135, or by a high school counselor or advisor.

(g) Has courses that are taught on a college campus, are college courses offered at the high school and taught by college faculty, or are courses taught in combination with online instruction.

(6) Funds to eligible CTE early/middle college and CTE dual enrollment programs shall be distributed as follows:

(a) The department shall determine statewide average CTE costs per pupil for each CIP code program by calculating statewide average costs for each CIP code program for the 3 most recent fiscal years.

(b) Distribution to each eligible CTE early/middle college or CTE dual enrollment program shall be the product of 50% of CTE costs per pupil times the current year pupil enrollment of each eligible CTE early/middle college or CTE dual enrollment program.

(7) In order to receive funds under this section, a CTE early/middle college or CTE dual enrollment program shall furnish to the intermediate district that is the fiscal agent identified in subsection (1), (2), in a form and manner determined by the department, all information needed to administer this program and meet federal reporting requirements; shall allow the department or the department’s designee to review all records related to the program for which it receives funds; and shall reimburse the state for all disallowances found in the review, as determined by the department.

(8) There is allocated from the funds under subsection (1) an amount not to exceed $500,000.00 EACH FISCAL YEAR for 2017‑2018 AND FOR 2018‑2019 for grants to intermediate districts or consortia of intermediate districts for the purpose of planning for new or expanded early middle college programs. Applications for grants shall be submitted in a form and manner determined by the department. The amount of a grant under this subsection shall not exceed $50,000.00. To be eligible for a grant under this subsection, an intermediate district or consortia of intermediate districts must provide matching funds equal to the grant received under this subsection. Notwithstanding section 17b, payments under this subsection may be made as determined by the department.

(9) Funds distributed under this section may be used to fund program expenditures that would otherwise be paid from foundation allowances. A program receiving funding under section 61a may receive funding under this section for allowable costs that exceed the reimbursement the program received under section 61a. The combined payments received by a program under section 61a and this section shall not exceed the total allowable costs of the program. A program provider shall not use more than 5% of the funds allocated under this section to the program for administrative costs.

(10) If the allocation under subsection (1) is insufficient to fully fund payments as otherwise calculated under this section, the department shall prorate payments under this section on an equal percentage basis.

(11) If pupils enrolled in a career cluster in an eligible CTE early/middle college or CTE dual enrollment program qualify to be reimbursed under this section, those pupils continue to qualify for reimbursement until graduation, even if the career cluster is no longer identified as being in the highest 5 career cluster rankings.

(12) As used in this section:

(a) “Allowable costs” means those costs directly attributable to the program as jointly determined by the Michigan talent investment agency and the department.

(B) “CAREER AND EDUCATIONAL ADVISORY COUNCIL” MEANS AN ADVISORY COUNCIL TO THE LOCAL WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT BOARDS LOCATED IN A PROSPERITY REGION CONSISTING OF EDUCATIONAL, EMPLOYER, LABOR, AND PARENT REPRESENTATIVES.

(C) (b) “CIP” means classification of instructional programs.

(D) (c) “CTE” means career and technical education programs.

(E) (d) “CTE dual enrollment program” means a 4‑year high school program of postsecondary courses offered by eligible postsecondary educational institutions that leads to an industry‑recognized certification or degree.

(F) (e) “Early/middle college program” means a 5‑year high school program.

(G) (f) “Eligible postsecondary educational institution” means that term as defined in section 3 of the career and technical preparation act, 2000 PA 258, MCL 388.1903.

(g) “Talent district career council” means an advisory council to the local workforce development boards located in a prosperity region consisting of educational, employer, labor, and parent representatives.

Sec. 61c. (1) From the general fund appropriation in section 11, there is allocated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 an amount not to exceed $7,000,000.00 $2,500,000.00 to ELIGIBLE career education planning districts for the CTE skilled trades initiative described in subsections (2) to (5). TO BE ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE FUNDING UNDER THIS SECTION, AT LEAST 50% OF THE AREA SERVED BY A CEPD MUST BE LOCATED IN AN INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT THAT DID NOT LEVY A VOCATIONAL EDUCATION MILLAGE IN 2018.

(2) To be eligible to receive funding under subsection (1), each ELIGIBLE CEPD shall apply in a form and manner determined by the department. Funding to each ELIGIBLE CEPD shall be equal to the quotient of the allocation under subsection (1) and the sum of the number of career education planning districts applying for funding under subsection (1) THAT ARE LOCATED IN AN INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT THAT DID NOT LEVY A VOCATIONAL EDUCATION MILLAGE IN 2018.

(3) The AT LEAST 50% OF THE funding allocated to each ELIGIBLE CEPD shall be used to update equipment in current CTE programs that have been identified in the highest 5 career cluster rankings in any of the 10 regional strategic plans jointly approved by the Michigan talent investment agency in the department of talent and economic development and the department, for training on new equipment, for professional development relating to computer science or coding, or for new and emerging certified CTE programs to allow CEPD administrators to provide programming in communities that will enhance economic development. The funding for equipment should be used to support and enhance community areas that have sustained job growth, and act as a commitment to build a more qualified and skilled workforce. In addition, each CEPD is encouraged to explore the option of leasing equipment from local private industry to encourage the use of the most advanced equipment.

(4) The allocation of funds at the local level shall be determined by CEPD administrators using data from the state, region, and local sources to make well‑informed decisions on program equipment improvements. Grants awarded by CEPD administrators for capital infrastructure shall be used to ensure that CTE programs can deliver educational programs in high‑wage, high‑skill, and high‑demand occupations. Each CEPD shall continue to ensure that program advisory boards make recommendations on needed improvements for equipment that support job growth and job skill development and retention for both the present and the future.

(5) Not later than September 15 of each fiscal year, each CEPD receiving funding under subsection (1) shall annually report to the department, the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on state school aid, and the senate and house fiscal agencies and legislature on equipment purchased under subsection (1). In addition, the report shall identify growth data on program involvement, retention, and development of student skills.

(6) In addition to the funds allocated under subsection (1), from the general fund appropriation in section 11, there is allocated for 2017‑2018 an amount not to exceed $500,000.00 to districts for a competitive grant to mechatronics programs that operated in 2016‑2017 for updating mechatronics program equipment.

(7) In addition to the funds allocated under subsections (1) and (6), from the general fund appropriation in section 11, there is allocated for 2017‑2018 an amount not to exceed $5,000,000.00 for grants to districts and intermediate districts or consortia of districts and intermediate districts for the CTE equipment and innovation competitive grant program described in subsections (8) to (10).

(8) To be eligible to receive a competitive grant under subsection (7), an applicant shall apply in a form and manner determined by the department. The amount of a grant awarded from the allocation under subsection (7) shall be at least $100,000.00 but shall not exceed $1,000,000.00 and shall be used for the purchase or lease of equipment from private industry partners and for related capacity building activities. A grant application for a grant awarded from the allocation under subsection (7) shall include at least all of the following information:

(a) A description of how the proposed capital infrastructure initiative will provide increased career opportunities for students and adult learners in high‑wage, high‑skill, and high‑demand occupations.

(b) Demonstrated evidence of employer demand for the initiative and related CTE training, including documentation of industry involvement in the initiative that will allow for workbased learning opportunities, apprenticeships, teacher externships, or a combination of these.

(c) A budget for the initiative, including demonstrated commitment of local or regional partners to sustain the initiative beyond the initial grant funding.

(d) A description of how the initiative aligns with other CTE and community college programs and how the equipment will be utilized by initiative partners.

(e) Other information as requested by the department and the department of talent and economic development.

(9) The department shall evaluate grant applications under subsection (8) in collaboration with the department of talent and economic development. A member of the governor’s talent investment board may serve in an advisory capacity in the evaluation process as determined by the department of talent and economic development.

(10) Not later than December 15 of each fiscal year, each grant recipient receiving funding under subsection (7) shall annually report to the department, the department of talent and economic development, the house and senate appropriations subcommittees on state school aid, the house and senate fiscal agencies, and the state budget director on equipment purchased under subsection (7) in the immediately preceding school year. The report shall identify growth data on program involvement, retention, and development of student and adult learner skills.

(6) (11) As used in this section:

(a) “CEPD” means a career education planning district described in this section.

(b) “CTE” means career and technical education.

SEC. 61D. (1) FROM THE APPROPRIATION IN SECTION 11, THERE IS ALLOCATED AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $5,000,000.00 FOR 2018‑2019 FOR ADDITIONAL PAYMENTS TO DISTRICTS FOR CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS FOR THE PURPOSE OF INCREASING THE NUMBER OF MICHIGAN RESIDENTS WITH HIGH‑QUALITY DEGREES OR CREDENTIALS, AND TO INCREASE THE NUMBER OF PUPILS WHO ARE COLLEGE‑ AND CAREER‑READY UPON HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION.

(2) PAYMENTS TO DISTRICTS UNDER THIS SECTION MUST BE CALCULATED IN THE FOLLOWING MANNER:

(A) A PAYMENT OF $25.00 MULTIPLIED BY THE NUMBER OF PUPILS IN GRADES 9 TO 12 WHO ARE COUNTED IN MEMBERSHIP IN THE DISTRICT AND ARE ENROLLED IN AT LEAST 1 CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM.

(B) AN ADDITIONAL PAYMENT OF $25.00 MULTIPLIED BY THE NUMBER OF PUPILS IN GRADES 9 TO 12 WHO ARE COUNTED IN MEMBERSHIP IN THE DISTRICT AND ARE ENROLLED IN AT LEAST 1 CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM THAT PROVIDES INSTRUCTION IN CRITICAL SKILLS AND HIGH‑DEMAND CAREER FIELDS.

(3) IF THE ALLOCATION UNDER SUBSECTION (1) IS INSUFFICIENT TO FULLY FUND PAYMENTS UNDER SUBSECTION (2), THE DEPARTMENT SHALL PRORATE PAYMENTS UNDER THIS SECTION ON AN EQUAL PER‑PUPIL BASIS.

(4) AS USED IN THIS SECTION:

(A) “CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM” MEANS A STATE‑APPROVED CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM, AS DETERMINED BY THE DEPARTMENT.

(B) “CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM THAT PROVIDES INSTRUCTION IN CRITICAL SKILLS AND HIGH‑DEMAND CAREER FIELD” MEANS A CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM CLASSIFIED UNDER ANY OF THE FOLLOWING 2‑DIGIT CLASSIFICATION OF INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS (CIP) CODES:

(i) 01, WHICH REFERS TO “AGRICULTURE, AGRICULTURE OPERATIONS, AND RELATED SCIENCES”.

(ii) 03, WHICH REFERS TO “NATURAL RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION”.

(iii) 10 THROUGH 11, WHICH REFERS TO “COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGIES/TECHNICIANS AND SUPPORT SERVICES” AND “COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCES AND SUPPORT SERVICES”.

(iv) 14 THROUGH 15, WHICH REFERS TO “ENGINEERING” AND “ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES AND ENGINEERING‑RELATED FIELDS”.

(v) 26, WHICH REFERS TO “BIOLOGICAL AND BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES”.

(vi) 46 THROUGH 48, WHICH REFERS TO “CONSTRUCTION TRADES”, “MECHANIC AND REPAIR TECHNOLOGIES/TECHNICIANS”, AND “PRECISION PRODUCTION”.

(vii) 51, WHICH REFERS TO “HEALTH PROFESSIONS AND RELATED PROGRAMS”.

SEC. 61E. (1) FROM THE FUNDS APPROPRIATED IN SECTION 11, THERE IS ALLOCATED FOR 2017‑2018 AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $250,000.00 TO A DISTRICT FOR REGIONAL CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION PLANNING.

(2) A DISTRICT IS ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE FUNDS UNDER THIS SECTION IF IT MEETS ALL OF THE FOLLOWING:

(A) IS LOCATED IN AN INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT IN WHICH THE COMBINED PUPIL MEMBERSHIPS OF THE INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT’S CONSTITUENT DISTRICTS IN 2017‑2018 IS AT LEAST 26,000 AND LESS THAN 28,000.

(B) IS LOCATED IN A COUNTY WITH A POPULATION OF NOT MORE THAN 160,000 AS OF THE MOST RECENT FEDERAL DECENNIAL CENSUS.

(C) HAS A PUPIL MEMBERSHIP GREATER THAN 2,900 BUT LESS THAN 3,100.

(D) COLLABORATES WITH OTHER DISTRICTS, AREA NONPROFITS, LOCAL EMPLOYERS, AND COMMUNITY COLLEGES.

(3) THE DISTRICT SHALL SUBMIT A REPORT INCLUDING A REGIONAL CAREER AND TECHNICAL PLAN TO THE DEPARTMENT NOT LATER THAN NOVEMBER 30, 2018. THE REPORT REQUIRED UNDER THIS SUBSECTION MUST INCLUDE ALL OF THE FOLLOWING:

(A) A PLAN FOR THE JOINT DELIVERY OF CAREER AND TECHNICAL SERVICES TO URBAN AND RURAL YOUTH, SPECIFICALLY WHILE OVERCOMING SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC BARRIERS THAT ADVERSELY AFFECT YOUTH POPULATIONS AND PROVIDING WRAPAROUND SERVICES TO MITIGATE BARRIERS TO EDUCATION.

(B) AN OUTLINE OF UNIQUE OPPORTUNITIES FOR EDUCATION, WORKFORCE BOARDS, AND BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY TO CREATE A COLLABORATIVE, JOINTLY OPERATED, AND SUSTAINABLE CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION MODEL.

(C) A DISCUSSION OF THE PROJECT’S ABILITY TO ENGAGE THE AT‑RISK YOUTH POPULATION IN CHALLENGING EDUCATION AND TRAINING ENVIRONMENTS.

(D) A LIST OF SOLUTIONS TO INDUSTRY DEMAND FOR THE REGIONAL WORKFORCE THROUGH AN UNDERSTANDING OF ECONOMIC TRENDS.

(4) NOTWITHSTANDING SECTION 17B, PAYMENTS UNDER THIS SECTION MAY BE MADE ON A SCHEDULE DETERMINED BY THE DEPARTMENT.

Sec. 62. (1) For the purposes of this section:

(a) “Membership” means for a particular fiscal year the total membership for the immediately preceding fiscal year of the intermediate district and the districts constituent to the intermediate district or the total membership for the immediately preceding fiscal year of the area vocational‑technical program.

(b) “Millage levied” means the millage levied for area vocational‑technical education pursuant to sections 681 to 690 of the revised school code, MCL 380.681 to 380.690, including a levy for debt service obligations incurred as the result of borrowing for capital outlay projects and in meeting capital projects fund requirements of area vocational‑technical education.

(c) “Taxable value” means the total taxable value of the districts constituent to an intermediate district or area vocational‑technical education program, except that if a district has elected not to come under sections 681 to 690 of the revised school code, MCL 380.681 to 380.690, the membership and taxable value of that district shall not be included in the membership and taxable value of the intermediate district. However, the membership and taxable value of a district that has elected not to come under sections 681 to 690 of the revised school code, MCL 380.681 to 380.690, shall be included in the membership and taxable value of the intermediate district if the district meets both of the following:

(i) The district operates the area vocational‑technical education program pursuant to a contract with the intermediate district.

(ii) The district contributes an annual amount to the operation of the program that is commensurate with the revenue that would have been raised for operation of the program if millage were levied in the district for the program under sections 681 to 690 of the revised school code, MCL 380.681 to 380.690.

(2) From the appropriation in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $9,190,000.00 each fiscal year for 2016‑2017 and for 2017‑2018 AND FOR 2018‑2019 to reimburse intermediate districts and area vocational‑technical education programs established under section 690(3) of the revised school code, MCL 380.690, levying millages for area vocational‑technical education pursuant to sections 681 to 690 of the revised school code, MCL 380.681 to 380.690. The purpose, use, and expenditure of the reimbursement shall be limited as if the funds were generated by those millages.

(3) Reimbursement for the millages levied in 2015‑2016 shall be made in 2016‑2017 at an amount per 2015‑2016 membership pupil computed by subtracting from $198,100.00 the 2015‑2016 taxable value behind each membership pupil and multiplying the resulting difference by the 20152016 millage levied.

(3) (4) Reimbursement for those millages levied in 2016‑2017 shall be made in 2017‑2018 at an amount per 2016‑2017 membership pupil computed by subtracting from $199,000.00 $200,800.00 the 2016‑2017 taxable value behind each membership pupil and multiplying the resulting difference by the 2016‑2017 millage levied, and then subtracting from that amount the 2016‑2017 local community stabilization share revenue for area vocational technical education behind each membership pupil for reimbursement of personal property exemption loss under the local community stabilization authority act, 2014 PA 86, MCL 123.1341 to 123.1362.

(4) REIMBURSEMENT FOR THOSE MILLAGES LEVIED IN 2017‑2018 SHALL BE MADE IN 2018‑2019 AT AN AMOUNT PER 2017‑2018 MEMBERSHIP PUPIL COMPUTED BY SUBTRACTING FROM $205,700.00 THE 2017‑2018 TAXABLE VALUE BEHIND EACH MEMBERSHIP PUPIL AND MULTIPLYING THE RESULTING DIFFERENCE BY THE 2017‑2018 MILLAGE LEVIED, AND THEN SUBTRACTING FROM THAT AMOUNT THE 2017‑2018 LOCAL COMMUNITY STABILIZATION SHARE REVENUE FOR AREA VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL EDUCATION BEHIND EACH MEMBERSHIP PUPIL FOR REIMBURSEMENT OF PERSONAL PROPERTY EXEMPTION LOSS UNDER THE LOCAL COMMUNITY STABILIZATION AUTHORITY ACT, 2014 PA 86, MCL 123.1341 TO 123.1362.

(5) The amount paid to a single intermediate district under this section shall not exceed 38.4% of the total amount allocated under subsection (2).

(6) The amount paid to a single intermediate district under this section shall not be less than 75% of the amount allocated to the intermediate district under this section for the immediately preceding fiscal year.

Sec. 64b. (1) From the appropriation in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $1,750,000.00 for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for supplemental payments to districts that support the attendance of district pupils in grades 9 to 12 under the postsecondary enrollment options act, 1996 PA 160, MCL 388.511 to 388.524, or under the career and technical preparation act, 2000 PA 258, MCL 388.1901 to 388.1913, consistent with section 21b, or that support the attendance of district pupils in a concurrent enrollment program if the district meets the requirements under subsection (3). Programs funded under this section are intended to increase the number of pupils who are college‑ and career‑ready upon high school graduation.

(2) To be eligible for payments under this section for supporting the attendance of district pupils under the postsecondary enrollment options act, 1996 PA 160, MCL 388.511 to 388.524, or under the career and technical preparation act, 2000 PA 258, MCL 388.1901 to 388.1913, a district shall do all of the following:

(a) Provide information to all high school pupils on postsecondary enrollment options, including enrollment eligibility, the institutions and types of courses that are eligible for participation, the decision‑making process for granting academic credit, and an explanation of eligible charges that will be paid by the district.

(b) Enter into a written agreement with a postsecondary institution before the enrollment of district pupils.

(c) Agree to pay all eligible charges pursuant to section 21b.

(d) Award high school credit for the postsecondary course if the pupil successfully completes the course.

(3) To be eligible for payments under this section for pupils enrolled in a concurrent enrollment program, a district shall do all of the following:

(a) Provide information to all high school pupils on postsecondary enrollment options, including enrollment eligibility, the institutions and types of courses that are eligible for participation, the decision‑making process for granting academic credit, and an explanation of eligible charges that will be paid by the district.

(b) Enter into a written agreement with a postsecondary institution establishing the concurrent enrollment program before the enrollment of district pupils in a postsecondary course through the postsecondary institution.

(c) Ensure that the course is taught by either a high school teacher or postsecondary faculty pursuant to standards established by the postsecondary institution with which the district has entered into a written agreement to operate the concurrent enrollment program.

(d) Ensure that the written agreement provides that the postsecondary institution agrees not to charge the pupil for any cost of the program.

(e) Ensure that the course is taught in the local district or intermediate district.

(f) Ensure that the pupil is awarded both high school and college credit at a community college or state public university in this state upon successful completion of the course as outlined in the agreement with the postsecondary institution.

(4) Funds shall be awarded to eligible districts under this section in the following manner:

(a) A payment of $10.00 per credit, for up to 3 credits, for a credit‑bearing course in which a pupil enrolls during the current school year, as described under either subsection (2) or (3).

(b) An additional payment of $30.00 per‑pupil per course identified in subdivision (a), if the pupil successfully completes, and is awarded both high school and postsecondary credit for, the course during the current school year.

(5) A district requesting payment under this section shall submit an application to the department in the form and manner prescribed by the department. Notwithstanding section 17b, payments under this section shall be made on a schedule determined by the department.

Sec. 64d. (1) From the general fund appropriation under section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $2,300,000.00 for 2017‑2018 FOR 2018‑2019 for a competitive grant to provide information technology education opportunities to students attending schools operating grades K‑12, career and technical centers and career academies, and community colleges and universities. It is the intent of the legislature that 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 is the first SECOND of 3 years of funding for the competitive grant program. Funds allocated under this section shall be used for instruction in information technology skills and competencies that are essential for the workplace and requested by employers and shall allow participating students and faculties to secure broad‑based information technology certifications and, if applicable, college credit.

(2) The department shall select a THE provider using a competitive request for proposals process. Proposals submitted under this subsection shall THAT RECEIVED FUNDING UNDER THIS SECTION IN 2017‑2018. A PROGRAM FUNDED UNDER THIS SECTION MUST include at least the following components:

(a) Research‑ and skill‑development‑based and information technology curriculum.

(b) Online access to the curriculum.

(c) Instructional software for classroom and student use.

(d) A program that includes coding curriculum and material that are aligned to the CS AP exam and grants a certificate upon completion of the program.

(e) Components for all grade levels on computational thinking skills development using the latest gaming software.

(f) A process for students to obtain certifications of skills and competencies in a broad base of information technology‑related skill areas.

(g) Professional development for faculty.

(h) Implementation and program support, including, but not limited to, integration with current curriculum standards.

(i) Methods for students to earn college credit.

(3) The department shall give priority to proposals by providers that have previously demonstrated success in this state in providing high‑quality information technology education opportunities to students.

(3) (4) The funds allocated under this section for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 are a work project appropriation, and any unexpended funds for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 are to be carried forward into 2018‑2019. 2019‑2020. The purpose of the work project is to continue to provide information technology education opportunities described in this section. The estimated completion date of the work project is September 30, 2020.

Sec. 65. (1) From the general fund money appropriated APPROPRIATION under section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $340,000.00 for 2017‑2018 $400,000.00 FOR 2018‑2019 for a pre‑college engineering K‑12 educational program that is focused on the development of a diverse future Michigan workforce, that serves multiple communities within southeast Michigan, that enrolls pupils from multiple districts, and that received funds appropriated for this purpose in the appropriations act that provided the Michigan strategic fund budget for 2014‑2015.

(2) To be eligible for funding under this section, a program must have the ability to expose pupils to, and motivate and prepare pupils for, science, technology, engineering, and mathematics careers and postsecondary education with special attention given to groups of pupils who are at‑risk and underrepresented in technical professions and careers.

Sec. 67. (1) From the general fund amount appropriated in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $3,000,000.00 for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for college access programs. The programs funded under this section are intended to inform students of college and career options and to provide resources intended to increase the number of pupils who are adequately prepared with the information needed to make informed decisions on college and career. The funds appropriated under this section are intended to be used to increase the number of Michigan residents with high‑quality degrees or credentials. Funds appropriated under this section shall not be used to supplant funding for counselors already funded by districts.

(2) The talent investment agency of the department of talent and economic development shall administer funds allocated under this section in collaboration with the Michigan college access network. These funds may be used for any of the following purposes:

(a) Michigan college access network operations, programming, and services to local college access networks.

(b) Local college access networks, which are community‑based college access/success partnerships committed to increasing the college participation and completion rates within geographically defined communities through a coordinated strategy.

(c) The Michigan college advising program, a program intended to place trained, recently graduated college advisors in high schools that serve significant numbers of low‑income and first‑generation college‑going pupils. State funds used for this purpose may not exceed 33% of the total funds available under this subsection.

(d) Subgrants of up to $5,000.00 to districts with comprehensive high schools that establish a college access team and implement specific strategies to create a college‑going culture in a high school in a form and manner approved by the Michigan college access network and the Michigan talent investment agency.

(e) The Michigan college access portal, an online one‑stop portal to help pupils and families plan and apply for college.

(f) Public awareness and outreach campaigns to encourage low‑income and first‑generation college‑going pupils to take necessary steps toward college and to assist pupils and families in completing a timely and accurate free application for federal student aid.

(g) Subgrants to postsecondary institutions to recruit, hire, and train college student mentors and college advisors to assist high school pupils in navigating the postsecondary planning and enrollment process.

(3) For the purposes of this section, “college” means any postsecondary educational opportunity that leads to a career, including, but not limited to, a postsecondary degree, industry‑recognized technical certification, or registered apprenticeship.

Sec. 74. (1) From the amount appropriated in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $3,730,300.00 for 2017‑2018 $3,754,900.00 FOR 2018‑2019 for the purposes of this section.

(2) From the allocation in subsection (1), there is allocated for each fiscal year the amount necessary for payments to state supported colleges or universities and intermediate districts providing school bus driver safety instruction pursuant to section 51 of the pupil transportation act, 1990 PA 187, MCL 257.1851. The payments shall be in an amount determined by the department not to exceed the actual cost of instruction and driver compensation for each public or nonpublic school bus driver attending a course of instruction. For the purpose of computing compensation, the hourly rate allowed each school bus driver shall not exceed the hourly rate received for driving a school bus. Reimbursement compensating the driver during the course of instruction shall be made by the department to the college or university or intermediate district providing the course of instruction.

(3) From the allocation in subsection (1), there is allocated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 the amount necessary to pay the reasonable costs of nonspecial education auxiliary services transportation provided pursuant to section 1323 of the revised school code, MCL 380.1323. Districts funded under this subsection shall not receive funding under any other section of this article for nonspecial education auxiliary services transportation.

(4) From the funds allocated in subsection (1), there is allocated an amount not to exceed $1,705,300.00 for 2017‑2018 $1,729,900.00 FOR 2018‑2019 for reimbursement to districts and intermediate districts for costs associated with the inspection of school buses and pupil transportation vehicles by the department of state police as required under section 715a of the Michigan vehicle code, 1949 PA 300, MCL 257.715a, and section 39 of the pupil transportation act, 1990 PA 187, MCL 257.1839. The department of state police shall prepare a statement of costs attributable to each district for which bus inspections are provided and submit it to the department and to an intermediate district serving as fiduciary in a time and manner determined jointly by the department and the department of state police. Upon review and approval of the statement of cost, the department shall forward to the designated intermediate district serving as fiduciary the amount of the reimbursement on behalf of each district and intermediate district for costs detailed on the statement within 45 days after receipt of the statement. The designated intermediate district shall make payment in the amount specified on the statement to the department of state police within 45 days after receipt of the statement. The total reimbursement of costs under this subsection shall not exceed the amount allocated under this subsection. Notwithstanding section 17b, payments to eligible entities under this subsection shall be paid on a schedule prescribed by the department.

Sec. 81. (1) From the appropriation in section 11, there is allocated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 to the intermediate districts the sum necessary, but not to exceed $67,108,000.00 $68,453,000.00 to provide state aid to intermediate districts under this section.

(2) The amount allocated under this section to each intermediate district is an amount equal to 100% 102% of the amount allocated to the intermediate district under this section for 2016‑2017. 2017‑2018. Funding provided under this section shall be used to comply with requirements of this article and the revised school code that are applicable to intermediate districts, and for which funding is not provided elsewhere in this article, and to provide technical assistance to districts as authorized by the intermediate school board.

(3) Intermediate districts receiving funds under this section, shall collaborate with the department to develop expanded professional development opportunities for teachers to update and expand their knowledge and skills needed to support the Michigan merit curriculum.

(4) From the allocation in subsection (1), there is allocated to an intermediate district, formed by the consolidation or annexation of 2 or more intermediate districts or the attachment of a total intermediate district to another intermediate school district or the annexation of all of the constituent K‑12 districts of a previously existing intermediate school district which has disorganized, an additional allotment of $3,500.00 each fiscal year for each intermediate district included in the new intermediate district for 3 years following consolidation, annexation, or attachment.

(5) In order to receive funding under this section, an intermediate district shall do all of the following:

(a) Demonstrate to the satisfaction of the department that the intermediate district employs at least 1 person who is trained in pupil accounting and auditing procedures, rules, and regulations.

(b) Demonstrate to the satisfaction of the department that the intermediate district employs at least 1 person who is trained in rules, regulations, and district reporting procedures for the individual‑level student data that serves as the basis for the calculation of the district and high school graduation and dropout rates.

(c) Comply with sections 1278a and 1278b of the revised school code, MCL 380.1278a and 380.1278b.

(d) Furnish data and other information required by state and federal law to the center and the department in the form and manner specified by the center or the department, as applicable.

(e) Comply with section 1230g of the revised school code, MCL 380.1230g.

(f) Comply with section 761 of the revised school code, MCL 380.761.

Sec. 94. (1) From the general fund appropriation in section 11, there is allocated to the department for 2017‑2018 an amount not to exceed $750,000.00 AND THERE IS ALLOCATED TO THE DEPARTMENT FOR 2018‑2019 AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $1,000,000.00 for efforts to increase the number of pupils who participate and succeed in advanced placement and international baccalaureate programs, AND, BEGINNING IN 2018‑2019, TO SUPPORT THE COLLEGE‑LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP).

(2) From the funds allocated under this section, the department shall award funds to cover all or part of the costs of advanced placement test fees or international baccalaureate test fees and international baccalaureate registration fees for low‑income pupils who take an advanced placement or an international baccalaureate test, AND, BEGINNING IN 2018‑2019, CLEP FEES FOR LOW‑INCOME PUPILS WHO TAKE A CLEP TEST. Payments shall not exceed $20.00 per test completed or $150.00 per international baccalaureate registration fees per pupil registered.

(3) The department shall only award funds under this section if the department determines that all of the following criteria are met:

(a) Each pupil for whom payment is made meets eligibility requirements of the federal advanced placement test fee program under section 1701 of the no child left behind act of 2001, Public Law 107‑110, or under a corresponding provision of the every student succeeds act, Public Law 114‑95.

(b) The tests are administered by the college board, the international baccalaureate organization, or another test provider approved by the department.

(c) The pupil for whom payment is made pays at least $5.00 toward the cost of each test for which payment is made.

(4) The department shall establish procedures for awarding funds under this section.

(5) Notwithstanding section 17b, payments under this section shall be made on a schedule determined by the department.

Sec. 94a. (1) There is created within the state budget office in the department of technology, management, and budget the center for educational performance and information. The center shall do all of the following:

(a) Coordinate the collection of all data required by state and federal law from districts, intermediate districts, and postsecondary institutions.

(b) Create, maintain, and enhance this state’s P‑20 longitudinal data system and ensure that it meets the requirements of subsection (4).

(c) Collect data in the most efficient manner possible in order to reduce the administrative burden on reporting entities, including, but not limited to, electronic transcript services.

(d) Create, maintain, and enhance this state’s web‑based educational portal to provide information to school leaders, teachers, researchers, and the public in compliance with all federal and state privacy laws. Data shall include, but are not limited to, all of the following:

(i) Data sets that link teachers to student information, allowing districts to assess individual teacher impact on student performance and consider student growth factors in teacher and principal evaluation systems.

(ii) Data access or, if practical, data sets, provided for regional data hubs that, in combination with local data, can improve teaching and learning in the classroom.

(iii) Research‑ready data sets for researchers to perform research that advances this state’s educational performance.

(e) Provide data in a useful manner to allow state and local policymakers to make informed policy decisions.

(f) Provide public reports to the citizens of this state to allow them to assess allocation of resources and the return on their investment in the education system of this state.

(g) Other functions as assigned by the state budget director.

(2) Each state department, officer, or agency that collects information from districts, intermediate districts, or postsecondary institutions as required under state or federal law shall make arrangements with the center to ensure that the state department, officer, or agency is in compliance with subsection (1). This subsection does not apply to information collected by the department of treasury under the uniform budgeting and accounting act, 1968 PA 2, MCL 141.421 to 141.440a; the revised municipal finance act, 2001 PA 34, MCL 141.2101 to 141.2821; the school bond qualification, approval, and loan act, 2005 PA 92, MCL 388.1921 to 388.1939; or section 1351a of the revised school code, MCL 380.1351a.

(3) The center may enter into any interlocal agreements necessary to fulfill its functions.

(4) The center shall ensure that the P‑20 longitudinal data system required under subsection (1)(b) meets all of the following:

(a) Includes data at the individual student level from preschool through postsecondary education and into the workforce.

(b) Supports interoperability by using standard data structures, data formats, and data definitions to ensure linkage and connectivity in a manner that facilitates the exchange of data among agencies and institutions within the state and between states.

(c) Enables the matching of individual teacher and student records so that an individual student may be matched with those teachers providing instruction to that student.

(d) Enables the matching of individual teachers with information about their certification and the institutions that prepared and recommended those teachers for state certification.

(e) Enables data to be easily generated for continuous improvement and decision‑making, including timely reporting to parents, teachers, and school leaders on student achievement.

(f) Ensures the reasonable quality, validity, and reliability of data contained in the system.

(g) Provides this state with the ability to meet federal and state reporting requirements.

(h) For data elements related to preschool through grade 12 and postsecondary, meets all of the following:

(i) Contains a unique statewide student identifier that does not permit a student to be individually identified by users of the system, except as allowed by federal and state law.

(ii) Contains student‑level enrollment, demographic, and program participation information.

(iii) Contains student‑level information about the points at which students exit, transfer in, transfer out, drop out, or complete education programs.

(iv) Has the capacity to communicate with higher education data systems.

(i) For data elements related to preschool through grade 12 only, meets all of the following:

(i) Contains yearly test records of individual students for assessments approved by DED‑OESE for accountability purposes under section 1111(b) of the elementary and secondary education act of 1965, 20 USC 6311, including information on individual students not tested, by grade and subject.

(ii) Contains student‑level transcript information, including information on courses completed and grades earned.

(iii) Contains student‑level college readiness test scores.

(j) For data elements related to postsecondary education only:

(i) Contains data that provide information regarding the extent to which individual students transition successfully from secondary school to postsecondary education, including, but not limited to, all of the following:

(A) Enrollment in remedial coursework.

(B) Completion of 1 year’s worth of college credit applicable to a degree within 2 years of enrollment.

(ii) Contains data that provide other information determined necessary to address alignment and adequate preparation for success in postsecondary education.

(5) From the general fund appropriation in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $10,173,200.00 for 2016‑2017 and an amount not to exceed $16,216,000.00 $16,356,700.00 for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 to the department of technology, management, and budget to support the operations of the center. In addition, from the federal funds appropriated in section 11 there is allocated for each fiscal year for 2016‑2017 and for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 the amount necessary, estimated at $193,500.00, to support the operations of the center and to establish a P‑20 longitudinal data system necessary for state and federal reporting purposes. The center shall cooperate with the department to ensure that this state is in compliance with federal law and is maximizing opportunities for increased federal funding to improve education in this state.

(6) From the funds allocated in subsection (5), the center may use an amount determined by the center for competitive grants for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 to support collaborative efforts on the P‑20 longitudinal data system. All of the following apply to grants awarded under this subsection:

(a) The center shall award competitive grants to eligible intermediate districts or a consortium of intermediate districts based on criteria established by the center.

(b) Activities funded under the grant shall support the P‑20 longitudinal data system portal and may include portal hosting, hardware and software acquisition, maintenance, enhancements, user support and related materials, and professional learning tools and activities aimed at improving the utility of the P‑20 longitudinal data system.

(c) An applicant that received a grant under this subsection for the immediately preceding fiscal year shall receive priority for funding under this section. However, after 3 fiscal years of continuous funding, an applicant is required to compete openly with new applicants.

(7) Funds allocated under this section that are not expended in the fiscal year in which they were allocated may be carried forward to a subsequent fiscal year and are appropriated for the purposes for which the funds were originally allocated.

(8) The center may bill departments as necessary in order to fulfill reporting requirements of state and federal law. The center may also enter into agreements to supply custom data, analysis, and reporting to other principal executive departments, state agencies, local units of government, and other individuals and organizations. The center may receive and expend funds in addition to those authorized in subsection (5) to cover the costs associated with salaries, benefits, supplies, materials, and equipment necessary to provide such data, analysis, and reporting services.

(9) As used in this section:

(a) “DED‑OESE” means the United States Department of Education Office of Elementary and Secondary Education.

(b) “State education agency” means the department.

Sec. 95b. (1) From the general fund appropriation under section 11, there is allocated to the department an amount not to exceed $2,500,000.00 for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for the department to adopt a model value‑added growth and projection analytics system and to incorporate that model into its reporting requirements under the every student succeeds act, Public Law 114‑95. The adopted model shall do at least all of the following:

(a) Utilize existing assessments and any future assessments that are suitable for measuring student growth.

(b) Report student growth measures at the district, school, teacher, and subgroup levels.

(c) Recognize the growth of tested students, including those who may have missing assessment data.

(d) Include all available prior standardized assessment data that meet inclusion criteria across grades, subjects, and state and local assessments.

(e) Allow student growth results to be disaggregated.

(f) Provide individual student projections showing the probability of a student reaching specific performance levels on future assessments.

(g) Demonstrate any prior success with this state’s assessments through the Michigan council of educator effectiveness teacher evaluation pilot.

(h) Demonstrate prior statewide implementation in at least 2 other states for at least 10 years.

(i) Have a native roster verification system built into the value‑added reporting platform that has been implemented statewide in at least 2 other states.

(j) Have a “Help/Contact Us” ticketing system built into the value‑added reporting platform.

(2) The department shall provide internet‑based electronic student growth and projection reporting based on the model adopted under subsection (1) to educators at the school, district, and state levels. The model shall include role‑based permissions that allow educators to access information about the performance of the students within their immediate responsibility in accordance with applicable privacy laws.

(3) The model adopted under subsection (1) must not be a mandatory part of teacher evaluation or educator pay‑for‑performance systems.

(4) THE MODEL ADOPTED UNDER SUBSECTION (1) MUST BE A MODEL THAT RECEIVED FUNDING UNDER THIS SECTION IN 2017‑2018.

Sec. 98. (1) From the general fund money appropriated in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $7,387,500.00 for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for the purposes described in this section. The Michigan Virtual University shall provide a report to the legislature not later than November 1 , 2017 OF EACH YEAR that includes its mission, its plans, and proposed benchmarks it must meet, which shall include a plan to achieve a 50% increase in documented improvement in each requirement of the Michigan Virtual Learning Research Institute and Michigan Virtual School, and all other THE organizational priorities identified in this section, in order to receive full funding for 2018‑2019. 2019‑2020. Not later than March 1 , 2018, OF EACH YEAR, the Michigan Virtual University shall provide an update to the house and senate appropriations subcommittees on school aid to show the progress being made to meet the benchmarks identified.

(2) The Michigan Virtual University shall operate the Michigan Virtual Learning Research Institute. The Michigan Virtual Learning Research Institute shall do all of the following:

(a) Support and accelerate innovation in education through the following activities:

(i) Test, evaluate, and recommend as appropriate new technology‑based instructional tools and resources.

(ii) Research, design, and recommend virtual education delivery models for use by pupils and teachers that include age‑appropriate multimedia instructional content.

(iii) Research, develop, and recommend annually to the department criteria by which cyber schools and virtual course providers should be monitored and evaluated to ensure a quality education for their pupils.

(iv) Based on pupil completion and performance data reported to the department or the center for educational performance and information from cyber schools and other virtual course providers operating in this state, analyze the effectiveness of virtual learning delivery models in preparing pupils to be college‑ and career‑ready and publish a report that highlights enrollment totals, completion rates, and the overall impact on pupils. The report shall be submitted to the house and senate appropriations subcommittees on state school aid, the state budget director, the house and senate fiscal agencies, the department, districts, and intermediate districts not later than March 31 , 2018.OF EACH YEAR.

(v) Provide an extensive professional development program to at least 30,000 educational personnel, including teachers, school administrators, and school board members, that focuses on the effective integration of virtual learning into curricula and instruction. The Michigan Virtual Learning Research Institute is encouraged to work with the MiSTEM advisory council created under section 99s to coordinate professional development of teachers in applicable fields. In addition, the Michigan Virtual Learning Research Institute and external stakeholders are encouraged to coordinate with the department for professional development in this state. Not later than December 1 , 2018, OF EACH YEAR, the Michigan Virtual Learning Research Institute shall submit a report to the house and senate appropriations subcommittees on state school aid, the state budget director, the house and senate fiscal agencies, and the department on the number and percentage of teachers, school administrators, and school board members who have received professional development services from the Michigan Virtual University. The report shall also identify barriers and other opportunities to encourage the adoption of virtual learning in the public education system.

(vi) Identify and share best practices for planning, implementing, and evaluating virtual and blended education delivery models with intermediate districts, districts, and public school academies to accelerate the adoption of innovative education delivery models statewide.

(b) Provide leadership for this state’s system of virtual learning education by doing the following activities:

(i) Develop and report policy recommendations to the governor and the legislature that accelerate the expansion of effective virtual learning in this state’s schools.

(ii) Provide a clearinghouse for research reports, academic studies, evaluations, and other information related to virtual learning.

(iii) Promote and distribute the most current instructional design standards and guidelines for virtual teaching.

(iv) In collaboration with the department and interested colleges and universities in this state, support implementation and improvements related to effective virtual learning instruction.

(v) Pursue public/private partnerships that include districts to study and implement competency‑based technology‑rich virtual learning models.

(vi) Create a statewide network of school‑based mentors serving as liaisons between pupils, virtual instructors, parents, and school staff, as provided by the department or the center, and provide mentors with research‑based training and technical assistance designed to help more pupils be successful virtual learners.

(vii) Convene focus groups and conduct annual surveys of teachers, administrators, pupils, parents, and others to identify barriers and opportunities related to virtual learning.

(viii) Produce an annual consumer awareness report for schools and parents about effective virtual education providers and education delivery models, performance data, cost structures, and research trends.

(ix) Research and establish PROVIDE an internet‑based platform that educators can use to create student‑centric learning tools and resources FOR SHARING IN THE STATE’S OPEN EDUCATIONAL RESOURCE REPOSITORY and facilitate a user network that assists educators in using the CONTENT CREATION platform AND STATE REPOSITORY FOR OPEN EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES. As part of this initiative, the Michigan Virtual University shall work collaboratively with districts and intermediate districts to establish a plan to make available virtual resources that align to Michigan’s K‑12 curriculum standards for use by students, educators, and parents.

(x) Create and maintain a public statewide catalog of virtual learning courses being offered by all public schools and community colleges in this state. The Michigan Virtual Learning Research Institute shall identify and develop a list of nationally recognized best practices for virtual learning and use this list to support reviews of virtual course vendors, courses, and instructional practices. The Michigan Virtual Learning Research Institute shall also provide a mechanism for intermediate districts to use the identified best practices to review content offered by constituent districts. The Michigan Virtual Learning Research Institute shall review the virtual course offerings of the Michigan Virtual University, and make the results from these reviews available to the public as part of the statewide catalog. The Michigan Virtual Learning Research Institute shall ensure that the statewide catalog is made available to the public on the Michigan Virtual University website and shall allow the ability to link it to each district’s website as provided for in section 21f. The statewide catalog shall also contain all of the following:

(A) The number of enrollments in each virtual course in the immediately preceding school year.

(B) The number of enrollments that earned 60% or more of the total course points for each virtual course in the immediately preceding school year.

(C) The completion PASS rate for each virtual course.

(xi) Develop prototype and pilot SUPPORT registration, payment services, and transcript functionality to FOR the statewide catalog and train key stakeholders on how to use new features.

(xii) Collaborate with key stakeholders to examine district level accountability and teacher effectiveness issues related to virtual learning under section 21f and make findings and recommendations publicly available.

(xiii) Provide a report on the activities of the Michigan Virtual Learning Research Institute.

(3) To further enhance its expertise and leadership in virtual learning, the Michigan Virtual University shall continue to operate the Michigan Virtual School as a statewide laboratory and quality model of instruction by implementing virtual and blended learning solutions for Michigan schools in accordance with the following parameters:

(a) The Michigan Virtual School must maintain its accreditation status from recognized national and international accrediting entities.

(b) The Michigan Virtual University shall use no more than $1,000,000.00 of the amount allocated under this section to subsidize the cost paid by districts for virtual courses.

(c) In providing educators responsible for the teaching of virtual courses as provided for in this section, the Michigan Virtual School shall follow the requirements to request and assess, and the department of state police shall provide, a criminal history check and criminal records check under sections 1230 and 1230a of the revised school code, MCL 380.1230 and 380.1230a, in the same manner as if the Michigan Virtual School were a school district under those sections.

(4) From the funds allocated under subsection (1), the Michigan Virtual University shall allocate up to $500,000.00 to support the expansion of new online and blended educator professional development programs.

(5) If the course offerings are included in the statewide catalog of virtual courses under subsection (2)(b)(x), the Michigan Virtual School operated by the Michigan Virtual University may offer virtual course offerings, including, but not limited to, all of the following:

(a) Information technology courses.

(b) College level equivalent courses, as defined in section 1471 of the revised school code, MCL 380.1471.

(c) Courses and dual enrollment opportunities.

(d) Programs and services for at‑risk pupils.

(e) High school equivalency test preparation courses for adjudicated youth.

(f) Special interest courses.

(g) Professional development programs for teachers, school administrators, other school employees, and school board members.

(6) If a home‑schooled or nonpublic school student is a resident of a district that subscribes to services provided by the Michigan Virtual School, the student may use the services provided by the Michigan Virtual School to the district without charge to the student beyond what is charged to a district pupil using the same services.

(7) Not later than December 1 of each fiscal year, the Michigan Virtual University shall provide a report to the house and senate appropriations subcommittees on state school aid, the state budget director, the house and senate fiscal agencies, and the department that includes at least all of the following information related to the Michigan Virtual School for the preceding state fiscal year:

(a) A list of the districts served by the Michigan Virtual School.

(b) A list of virtual course titles available to districts.

(c) The total number of virtual course enrollments and information on registrations and completions by course.

(d) The overall course completion rate percentage.

(8) In addition to the information listed in subsection (7), the report under subsection (7) shall also include a plan to serve at least 600 schools with courses from the Michigan Virtual School or with content available through the internet‑based platform identified in subsection (2)(b)(ix).

(9) The governor may appoint an advisory group for the Michigan Virtual Learning Research Institute established under subsection (2). The members of the advisory group shall serve at the pleasure of the governor and shall serve without compensation. The purpose of the advisory group is to make recommendations to the governor, the legislature, and the president and board of the Michigan Virtual University that will accelerate innovation in this state’s education system in a manner that will prepare elementary and secondary students to be career and college ready and that will promote the goal of increasing the percentage of citizens of this state with high‑quality degrees and credentials to at least 60% by 2025.

(10) Not later than November 1 , 2017, OF EACH YEAR, the Michigan Virtual University shall submit to the house and senate appropriations subcommittees on state school aid, the state budget director, and the house and senate fiscal agencies a detailed budget for the 2017‑2018 THAT fiscal year that includes a breakdown on its projected costs to deliver virtual educational services to districts and a summary of the anticipated fees to be paid by districts for those services. Not later than March 1 each year, the Michigan Virtual University shall submit to the house and senate appropriations subcommittees on state school aid, the state budget director, and the house and senate fiscal agencies a breakdown on its actual costs to deliver virtual educational services to districts and a summary of the actual fees paid by districts for those services based on audited financial statements for the immediately preceding fiscal year.

(11) As used in this section:

(a) “Blended learning” means a hybrid instructional delivery model where pupils are provided content, instruction, and assessment, in part at a supervised educational facility away from home where the pupil and a teacher with a valid Michigan teaching certificate are in the same physical location and in part through internet‑connected learning environments with some degree of pupil control over time, location, and pace of instruction.

(b) “Cyber school” means a full‑time instructional program of virtual courses for pupils that may or may not require attendance at a physical school location.

(c) “Virtual course” means a course of study that is capable of generating a credit or a grade and that is provided in an interactive learning environment in which the majority of the curriculum is delivered using the internet and in which pupils are separated from their instructor or teacher of record by time or location, or both.

Sec. 99h. (1) From the state school aid fund appropriation in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $2,500,000.00 $3,000,000.00 FOR 2017‑2018 AND AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $3,000,000.00 for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for competitive grants to districts AND INTERMEDIATE DISTRICTS, and from the general fund appropriation in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $300,000.00 EACH FISCAL YEAR for 2017‑2018 AND FOR 2018‑2019 for competitive grants to nonpublic schools , that provide pupils in grades K to 12 with expanded opportunities to improve mathematics, science, and technology skills by participating in events hosted by a science and technology development program known as FIRST (for inspiration and recognition of science and technology) Robotics, including JR FIRST Lego League, FIRST Lego League, FIRST tech challenge, and FIRST Robotics competition, OR, BEGINNING IN 2018‑2019, OTHER COMPETITIVE ROBOTICS PROGRAMS, INCLUDING THOSE HOSTED BY THE ROBOTICS EDUCATION AND COMPETITION (REC) FOUNDATION. Programs funded under this section are intended to increase the number of pupils demonstrating proficiency in science and mathematics on the state assessments and to increase the number of pupils who are college‑ and career‑ready upon high school graduation. Notwithstanding section 17b, grant payments to districts, and nonpublic schools, AND INTERMEDIATE DISTRICTS under this section shall be paid on a schedule determined by the department. The department shall set maximum grant awards for each different level of competition in a manner that both maximizes the number of teams that will be able to receive funds and expands the geographical distribution of teams.

(2) A district, or nonpublic school, OR INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT applying for a grant under this section shall submit an application in a form and manner determined by the department. To be eligible for a grant, a district, or nonpublic school, OR INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT shall demonstrate in its application that the district, or nonpublic school, OR INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT has established a partnership for the purposes of the FIRST Robotics ROBOTICS program with at least 1 sponsor, business entity, higher education institution, or technical school, shall submit a spending plan, and shall pay at least 25% of the cost of the FIRST Robotics ROBOTICS program.

(3) The department shall distribute the grant funding under this section for the following purposes:

(a) Grants to districts, or nonpublic schools, OR INTERMEDIATE DISTRICTS to pay for stipends not to exceed $1,500.00 for 1 coach per team.

(b) Grants to districts, or nonpublic schools, OR INTERMEDIATE DISTRICTS for event registrations, materials, travel costs, and other expenses associated with the preparation for and attendance at FIRST Robotics ROBOTICS events and competitions. Each grant recipient shall provide a local match from other private or local funds for the funds received under this subdivision equal to at least 50% of the costs of participating in an event.

(c) Grants to districts, or nonpublic schools, OR INTERMEDIATE DISTRICTS for awards to teams that advance to the state and world championship competitions. The department shall determine an equal amount per team for those teams that advance to the state championship and a second equal award amount to those teams that advance to the world championship.

(4) A nonpublic school that receives a grant under this section may use the funds for either FIRST Robotics ROBOTICS or Science Olympiad programs.

(5) To be eligible to receive funds under this section, a nonpublic school must be a nonpublic school registered with the department and must meet all applicable state reporting requirements for nonpublic schools.

(6) THE FUNDS ALLOCATED UNDER THIS SECTION FOR 2017‑2018 ARE A WORK PROJECT APPROPRIATION, AND ANY UNEXPENDED FUNDS FOR 2017‑2018 ARE CARRIED FORWARD INTO 2018‑2019. THE PURPOSE OF THE WORK PROJECT IS TO CONTINUE SUPPORT OF FIRST ROBOTICS AND MUST NOT BE USED TO SUPPORT OTHER ROBOTICS COMPETITIONS. THE ESTIMATED COMPLETION DATE OF THE WORK PROJECT IS SEPTEMBER 30, 2020.

Sec. 99s. (1) From the funds appropriated under section 11, there is allocated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 an amount not to exceed $6,234,300.00 $7,634,300.00 from the state school aid fund appropriation and an amount not to exceed $1,600,000.00 $300,000.00 from the general fund appropriation for Michigan science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (MiSTEM) programs. In addition, from the federal funds appropriated in section 11, there is allocated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 an amount estimated at $4,700,000.00 $3,500,000.00 from DED‑OESE, title II, mathematics and science partnership grants. Programs funded under this section are intended to increase the number of pupils demonstrating proficiency in science and mathematics on the state assessments and to increase the number of pupils who are college‑ and career‑ready upon high school graduation. Notwithstanding section 17b, payments under this section shall be paid on a schedule determined by the department.

(2) From the general fund allocation in subsection (1), there is allocated an amount not to exceed $50,000.00 to the department for administrative, training, and travel costs related to the MiSTEM advisory council. All of the following apply to the MiSTEM advisory council: funded under this subsection:

(a) The MiSTEM advisory council is created. The MiSTEM advisory council shall provide to the governor, legislature, department of talent and economic development, and department recommendations designed to improve and promote innovation in STEM education and to prepare students for careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

(b) The MiSTEM advisory council created under subdivision (a) shall consist of the following members:

(i) The governor shall appoint 11 voting members who are representative of business sectors that are important to Michigan’s economy and rely on a STEM‑educated workforce, nonprofit organizations and associations that promote STEM education, K‑12 and postsecondary education entities involved in STEM‑related career education, or other sectors as considered appropriate by the governor. Each of these members shall serve at the pleasure of the governor and for a term determined by the governor.

(ii) The senate majority leader shall appoint 2 members of the senate to serve as nonvoting, ex‑officio members of the MiSTEM advisory council, including 1 majority party member and 1 minority party member.

(iii) The speaker of the house of representatives shall appoint 2 members of the house of representatives to serve as nonvoting, ex‑officio members of the MiSTEM advisory council, including 1 majority party member and 1 minority party member.

(c) Each member of the MiSTEM advisory council shall serve without compensation.

(d) The MiSTEM advisory council annually shall review and make recommendations to the governor, the legislature, and the department concerning changes to the statewide strategy adopted by the council for delivering STEM education‑related opportunities to pupils. The MiSTEM advisory council shall use funds received under this subsection to ensure that its members or their designees are trained in the Change the Equation STEMworks rating system program for the purpose of rating STEM programs.

(e) The MiSTEM advisory council shall make specific funding recommendations for the funds allocated under subsection (3) by December 15 of each fiscal year. The amount of each grant recommended shall not exceed $100,000.00. Each specific funding recommendation shall be for a program approved by the MiSTEM advisory council. To be eligible for MiSTEM advisory council approval, a program must satisfy all of the following:

(i) Align with this state’s academic standards.

(ii) Have STEMworks certification.

(iii) Provide project‑based experiential learning, student programming, or educator professional learning experiences.

(iv) Focus predominantly on classroom‑based STEM experiences or professional learning experiences.

(f) The MiSTEM advisory council shall approve programs that REPRESENT ALL NETWORK REGIONS AND include a diverse array of options for students and educators and at least 1 program in each of the following areas:

(i) Robotics.

(ii) Computer science or coding.

(iii) Engineering or bioscience.

(g) The MiSTEM advisory council is encouraged to work with the MiSTEM Network regions NETWORK to develop locally and regionally developed programs and professional development experiences for the programs on the list of approved programs.

(h) If the MiSTEM advisory council is unable to make specific funding recommendations by December 15 of a fiscal year, the department of technology, management, and budget shall award and the department shall distribute the funds allocated under subsection (3) on a competitive grant basis that at least follows the statewide STEM strategy plan and rating system recommended by the MiSTEM advisory council. Each grant shall not exceed $100,000.00 and must provide STEM education‑related opportunities for pupils.

(i) The MiSTEM advisory council shall work with the executive director of the MiSTEM network funded under section 99r to implement the statewide STEM strategy adopted by the MiSTEM advisory council.

(3) From the state school aid fund money allocated under subsection (1), there is allocated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 an amount not to exceed $2,850,000.00 $3,050,000.00 for the purpose of funding programs under this section for 2017‑2018, 2018‑2019, as recommended by the MiSTEM advisory council.

(4) From the state school aid fund allocation under subsection (1), there is allocated for 20172018 an amount not to exceed $3,299,300.00 to support the activities and programs of mathematics and science centers. In addition, from the federal funds allocated under subsection (1), there is allocated for 2017‑2018 an amount estimated at $4,700,000.00 from DED‑OESE, title II, mathematics and science partnership grants, for the purposes of this subsection. All of the following apply to the programs and funding under this subsection:

(a) Within a service area designated locally, approved by the department, and consistent with the comprehensive master plan for mathematics and science centers developed by the department and approved by the state board, an established mathematics and science center shall provide 2 or more of the following 6 basic services, as described in the master plan, to constituent districts and communities: leadership, pupil services, curriculum support, community involvement, professional development, and resource clearinghouse services.

(b) The department shall not award a state grant under this subsection to more than 1 mathematics and science center located in a designated region as prescribed in the 2007 master plan unless each of the grants serves a distinct target population or provides a service that does not duplicate another program in the designated region.

(c) As part of the technical assistance process, the department shall provide minimum standard guidelines that may be used by the mathematics and science center for providing fair access for qualified pupils and professional staff as prescribed in this subsection.

(d) Allocations under this subsection to support the activities and programs of mathematics and science centers shall be continuing support grants to all 33 established mathematics and science centers. For 2017‑2018, each established mathematics and science center shall receive state funding in an amount equal to 100% of the amount it was allocated under former section 99 for 2014‑2015. If a center declines state funding or a center closes, the remaining money available under this subsection shall be distributed to the remaining centers, as determined by the department.

(e) From the funds allocated under this subsection, the department shall distribute for 20172018 an amount not to exceed $750,000.00 in a form and manner determined by the department to those centers able to provide curriculum and professional development support to assist districts in implementing the Michigan merit curriculum components for mathematics and science. Funding under this subdivision is in addition to funding allocated under subdivision (d).

(f) It is the intent of the legislature that the funding allocated under this subsection represents the final year of funding for mathematics and science centers and that mathematics and science centers shall not be funded in 2018‑2019.

(5) From the funds allocated under subsection (1), there is allocated an amount not to exceed $85,000.00 to the Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network to reimburse intermediate school districts for transition costs incurred as the centers transition to MiSTEM network regions.

(4) (6) From the general SCHOOL AID fund allocation under subsection (1), there is allocated an amount not to exceed $1,400,000.00 to $3,834,300.00 FOR 2018‑2019 TO SUPPORT THE ACTIVITIES AND PROGRAMS OF the MiSTEM network regions. For 20172018, each established MiSTEM network region shall receive funding under this subsection in an amount equal to 50% of the state funding amount allocated for 2017‑2018 to the mathematics and science centers located within that region to allow the MiSTEM network region to begin operating by April 1, 2018. For former mathematics and science centers with territory in more than 1 MiSTEM network region, the amount allocated shall be divided proportionally.IN ADDITION, FROM THE FEDERAL FUNDS ALLOCATED UNDER SUBSECTION (1), THERE IS ALLOCATED FOR 2018‑2019 AN AMOUNT ESTIMATED AT $3,500,000.00 FROM DED‑OESE, TITLE II, MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE PARTNERSHIP GRANTS, FOR THE PURPOSES OF THIS SUBSECTION. BEGINNING IN 2018‑2019, THE FISCAL AGENT FOR EACH MISTEM NETWORK REGION SHALL RECEIVE $200,000.00 FOR THE BASE OPERATIONS OF EACH REGION. THE REMAINING FUNDS WILL BE DISTRIBUTED TO EACH FISCAL AGENT IN AN EQUAL AMOUNT PER PUPIL, BASED ON THE NUMBER OF K TO 12 PUPILS ENROLLED IN DISTRICTS WITHIN EACH REGION IN THE PRIOR FISCAL YEAR.

(5) (7) A MiSTEM network region shall do all of the following:

(a) Collaborate with the talent district career AND EDUCATIONAL ADVISORY council that is located in the prosperity MISTEM region to develop a regional strategic plan for STEM education that creates a robust regional STEM culture, that empowers STEM teachers, that integrates business and education into the STEM network, and that ensures high‑quality STEM experiences for pupils. At a minimum, a regional STEM strategic plan should do all of the following:

(i) Identify regional employer need for STEM.

(ii) Identify processes for regional employers and educators to create guided pathways for STEM careers that include internships or externships, apprenticeships, and other experiential engagements for pupils.

(iii) Identify educator professional development opportunities, including internships or externships and apprenticeships, that integrate this state’s science content standards into high‑quality STEM experiences that engage pupils.

(b) Facilitate regional STEM events such as educator and employer networking and STEM career fairs to raise STEM awareness.

(c) Contribute to the MiSTEM website and engage in other MiSTEM network functions to further the mission of STEM in this state in coordination with the MiSTEM advisory council and its executive director.

(d) Facilitate application and implementation of state and federal funds under this subsection and any other grants or funds for the MiSTEM network region.

(e) Work with districts to provide STEM programming and professional development.

(f) Coordinate recurring discussions and work with the talent district career AND EDUCATIONAL ADVISORY council to ensure that feedback and best practices are being shared, including funding, program, professional learning opportunities, and regional strategic plans.

(6) FROM THE SCHOOL AID FUNDS ALLOCATED UNDER SUBSECTION (1), THE DEPARTMENT SHALL DISTRIBUTE FOR 2018‑2019 AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $750,000.00, IN A FORM AND MANNER DETERMINED BY THE DEPARTMENT, TO THOSE NETWORK REGIONS ABLE TO PROVIDE CURRICULUM AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SUPPORT TO ASSIST DISTRICTS IN IMPLEMENTING THE MICHIGAN MERIT CURRICULUM COMPONENTS FOR MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE.

(7) (8) In order to receive state or federal funds under subsection (4) or (6), a grant recipient shall allow access for the department or the department’s designee to audit all records related to the program for which it receives those funds. The grant recipient shall reimburse the state for all disallowances found in the audit.

(8) (9) In order to receive state funds under subsection (4) or (6), a grant recipient shall provide at least a 10% local match from local public or private resources for the funds received under this subsection.

(9) (10) Not later than July 1, 2019 and July 1 of each year thereafter, a MiSTEM network region that receives funds under subsection (6) (4) shall report to the executive director of the MiSTEM network in a form and manner prescribed by the executive director on performance measures developed by the MiSTEM network regions and approved by the executive director. The performance measures shall be designed to ensure that the activities of the MiSTEM network are improving student academic outcomes.

(10) (11) Not more than 5% of a MiSTEM network region grant under subsection (4) OR (6) may be retained by a fiscal agent for serving as the fiscal agent of a MiSTEM network region.

(11) FROM THE GENERAL FUND ALLOCATION UNDER SUBSECTION (1), THERE IS ALLOCATED AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $300,000.00 TO THE DEPARTMENT OF TECHNOLOGY, MANAGEMENT, AND BUDGET TO SUPPORT THE FUNCTIONS OF THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR AND EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT FOR THE MISTEM NETWORK, AND FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, TRAINING, AND TRAVEL COSTS RELATED TO THE MISTEM ADVISORY COUNCIL. THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR AND EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT FOR THE MISTEM NETWORK SHALL DO ALL OF THE FOLLOWING:

(A) SERVE AS A LIAISON AMONG AND BETWEEN THE DEPARTMENT, THE DEPARTMENT OF TECHNOLOGY, MANAGEMENT, AND BUDGET, THE MISTEM ADVISORY COUNCIL, THE MICHIGAN MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE CENTERS NETWORK, THE GOVERNOR’S TALENT INVESTMENT BOARD, THE GENERAL EDUCATION LEADERSHIP NETWORK, AND THE MISTEM REGIONS IN A MANNER THAT CREATES A ROBUST STATEWIDE STEM CULTURE, THAT EMPOWERS STEM TEACHERS, THAT INTEGRATES BUSINESS AND EDUCATION INTO THE STEM NETWORK, AND THAT ENSURES HIGH‑QUALITY STEM EXPERIENCES FOR PUPILS.

(B) COORDINATE THE IMPLEMENTATION OF A MARKETING CAMPAIGN, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, A WEBSITE THAT INCLUDES DASHBOARDS OF OUTCOMES, TO BUILD STEM AWARENESS AND COMMUNICATE STEM NEEDS AND OPPORTUNITIES TO PUPILS, PARENTS, EDUCATORS, AND THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY.

(C) WORK WITH THE DEPARTMENT AND THE MISTEM ADVISORY COUNCIL TO COORDINATE, AWARD, AND MONITOR MISTEM STATE AND FEDERAL GRANTS TO THE MISTEM NETWORK REGIONS AND CONDUCT REVIEWS OF GRANT RECIPIENTS, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PUPIL EXPERIENCE AND FEEDBACK.

(D) REPORT TO THE GOVERNOR, THE LEGISLATURE, THE DEPARTMENT, AND THE MISTEM ADVISORY COUNCIL ANNUALLY ON THE ACTIVITIES AND PERFORMANCE OF THE MISTEM NETWORK REGIONS.

(E) COORDINATE RECURRING DISCUSSIONS AND WORK WITH REGIONAL STAFF TO ENSURE THAT A NETWORK OR LOOP OF FEEDBACK AND BEST PRACTICES ARE SHARED, INCLUDING FUNDING, PROGRAMMING, PROFESSIONAL LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES, DISCUSSION OF MISTEM STRATEGIC VISION, AND REGIONAL OBJECTIVES.

(F) COORDINATE MAJOR GRANT APPLICATION EFFORTS WITH THE MISTEM ADVISORY COUNCIL TO ASSIST REGIONAL STAFF WITH GRANT APPLICATIONS ON A LOCAL LEVEL. THE MISTEM ADVISORY COUNCIL SHALL LEVERAGE PRIVATE AND NONPROFIT RELATIONSHIPS TO COORDINATE AND ALIGN PRIVATE FUNDS IN ADDITION TO FUNDS APPROPRIATED UNDER THIS SECTION.

(G) TRAIN STATE AND REGIONAL STAFF IN THE STEMWORKS RATING SYSTEM, IN COLLABORATION WITH THE MISTEM ADVISORY COUNCIL AND THE DEPARTMENT.

(H) COLLABORATE WITH THE MISTEM NETWORK TO HIRE MISTEM NETWORK REGION STAFF.

(12) As used in this section:

(A) “CAREER AND EDUCATIONAL ADVISORY COUNCIL” MEANS AN ADVISORY COUNCIL TO THE LOCAL WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT BOARDS LOCATED IN A PROSPERITY REGION CONSISTING OF EDUCATIONAL, EMPLOYER, LABOR, AND PARENT REPRESENTATIVES.

(B) (a) “DED” means the United States Department of Education.

(C) (b) “DED‑OESE” means the DED Office of Elementary and Secondary Education.

(D) (c) “STEM” means science, technology, engineering, and mathematics delivered in an integrated fashion using cross‑disciplinary learning experiences that can include language arts, performing and fine arts, and career and technical education.

(d) “Talent district career council” means an advisory council to the local workforce development boards located in a prosperity region consisting of educational, employer, labor, and parent representatives.

(13) From the general fund allocation under subsection (1), there is allocated an amount not to exceed $150,000.00 for 2017‑2018 for a grant to the Van Andel Education Institute for the purposes of advancing and promoting science education and increasing the number of students who choose to pursue careers in science or sciencerelated fields. Funds allocated under this subsection shall be used to provide professional development for science teachers in using studentdriven, inquirybased instruction.

(14) Not later than January 1, 2019, the executive director of the MiSTEM centers network shall report to the house and senate appropriations subcommittees on school aid and the house and senate fiscal agencies on the number of male and female MiSTEM center program participants and the steps, if any, that the MiSTEM centers are taking to reduce any disparity between the number of male and female participants.

Sec. 99t. (1) From the general fund appropriation under section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $1,100,000.00 for 2017‑2018 $1,500,000.00 FOR 2018‑2019 to purchase statewide access to an online algebra tool that meets all of the following:

(a) Provides students statewide with complete access to videos aligned with state standards including study guides and workbooks that are aligned with the videos.

(b) Provides students statewide with access to a personalized online algebra learning tool including adaptive diagnostics.

(c) Provides students statewide with dynamic algebra practice assessments that emulate the state assessment with immediate feedback and help solving problems.

(d) Provides students statewide with online access to algebra help 24 hours a day and 7 days a week from study experts, teachers, and peers on a moderated social networking platform.

(e) Provides an online algebra professional development network for teachers.

(f) Is already provided under a statewide contract in at least 1 other state that has a population of at least 18,000,000 but not more than 19,000,000 according to the most recent decennial census and is offered in that state in partnership with a public university.

(2) The department shall purchase the online algebra tool that was chosen under this section in 2016‑2017.

(3) A grantee receiving funding under this section shall comply with the requirements of section 19b.

Sec. 99u. (1) From the general fund appropriation under section 11, there is allocated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 an amount not to exceed $1,000,000.00 $1,500,000.00 to purchase statewide access to an online mathematics tool that meets all of the following:

(a) Provides students statewide with complete access to mathematics support aligned with state standards through a program that has all of the following elements:

(i) Student motivation.

(ii) Valid and reliable assessments.

(iii) Personalized learning pathways.

(iv) Highly qualified, live teachers available all day and all year.

(v) Twenty‑four‑hour reporting.

(vi) Content built for rigorous mathematics.

(b) Has a record of improving student mathematics scores in at least 5 other states.

(C) RECEIVED FUNDING UNDER THIS SECTION IN 2017‑2018.

(2) A grantee that receives funding under this section shall comply with the requirements of section 19b.

(3) IN ADDITION TO THE FUNDS ALLOCATED UNDER SUBSECTION (1), FROM THE GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATION IN SECTION 11, THERE IS ALLOCATED FOR 2018‑2019 AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $500,000.00 FOR A SOFTWARE‑BASED SOLUTION DESIGNED TO TEACH SPANISH LANGUAGE LITERACY TO STUDENTS IN PRE‑KINDERGARTEN THROUGH FIRST GRADE. A PROGRAM FUNDED UNDER THIS SUBSECTION SHALL BE A GRANT TO A PROVIDER THAT PROMOTES BILINGUALISM AND BILITERACY, AND IS BASED ON RESEARCH THAT SHOWS HOW STUDENTS WHO BECOME PROFICIENT READERS IN THEIR FIRST LANGUAGE HAVE AN EASIER TIME MAKING THE TRANSITION TO READING PROFICIENCY IN A SECOND LANGUAGE. A PROVIDER OF PROGRAMMING UNDER SUBSECTION (1) IS AN ELIGIBLE PROVIDER OF PROGRAMMING UNDER THIS SUBSECTION.

SEC. 99V. FROM THE GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATION IN SECTION 11, THERE IS ALLOCATED AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $25,000.00 FOR 2018‑2019 FOR A GRANT TO BE DISTRIBUTED BY THE DEPARTMENT TO A PROVIDER THAT DEVELOPS AND SCALES EFFECTIVE INNOVATIONS TO SUPPORT EDUCATORS, ADMINISTRATORS, AND POLICYMAKERS IN CREATING SEAMLESS TRANSITIONS THROUGHOUT THE K‑14 SYSTEM FOR ALL STUDENTS, ESPECIALLY THE UNDERSERVED. A GRANTEE MUST HAVE EXPERTISE IN K‑12 SERVICES, ONLINE COURSE PROGRAMS, DIGITAL PLATFORM SERVICES, LEADERSHIP NETWORKS, AND HIGHER EDUCATION, AND WORK TO DEVELOP A MATHEMATICS PATHWAYS ALIGNMENT. A GRANTEE THAT RECEIVES A GRANT UNDER THIS SECTION SHALL FACILITATE A 2‑DAY MATH WORKSHOP WITH HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE FACULTY FOCUSED ON SHARING INFORMATION ABOUT HIGH‑IMPACT PRACTICES, DEFINING THE PROBLEM OR PROBLEMS, AND USING DATA AND PLANNING STRATEGIES TO ADDRESS THOSE PROBLEMS. IN ADDITION, THE GRANTEE SHALL USE FUNDS TO CONDUCT 3 VIRTUAL CHECK‑INS DURING WHICH THE WORKING GROUPS WILL REPORT ON PROGRESS AND IDENTIFY CHALLENGES AND QUESTIONS, WITH THE GRANTEE PROVIDING GUIDANCE AND RESOURCES AS APPROPRIATE.

Sec. 102d. (1) From the funds appropriated in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $1,500,000.00 for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for reimbursements to districts, intermediate districts, and authorizing bodies of public school academies for the licensing of school data analytical tools as described under this section. The reimbursement is for districts, intermediate districts, and authorizing bodies of public school academies that choose to use a school data analytical tool to assist the district, intermediate district, or authorizing body of a public school academy and that enter into a licensing agreement for a school data analytical tool with 1 of the vendors approved by the department of technology, management, and budget under subsection (2). Funds allocated under this section are intended to provide districts, intermediate districts, and authorizing bodies of public school academies with financial forecasting and transparency reporting tools to help improve the financial health of districts and to improve communication with the public, resulting in increased fund balances for districts and intermediate districts.

(2) Not later than October 15, 2017, the department of technology, management, and budget shall review vendors for school data analytical tools and provide districts, intermediate districts, and authorizing bodies of public school academies with a list of up to 2 approved vendors that districts, intermediate districts, and authorizing bodies of public school academies may use to be eligible for a reimbursement paid under this section. In addition, a A vendor approved under this section for 2016‑2017 2017‑2018 is considered to be approved for use by a district, intermediate district, or authorizing body of a public school academy and for reimbursement for 2017‑2018. An approved school data analytical tool supplied by the vendor must meet at least all of the following:2018‑2019.

(a) Analyzes financial data.

(b) Analyzes academic data.

(c) Provides early warning indicators of financial stress.

(d) Has the capability to provide peer district comparisons of both financial and academic data.

(e) Has the capability to provide financial projections for at least 3 subsequent fiscal years.

(3) Funds allocated under this section shall be paid to districts, intermediate districts, and authorizing bodies of public school academies as a reimbursement for already having a licensing agreement or for entering into a licensing agreement not later than December 1, 2017 2018 with a vendor approved under subsection (2) to implement a school data analytical tool. Reimbursement will be prorated for the portion of the state fiscal year not covered by the licensing agreement. However, a licensing agreement that takes effect after October 1, 2017 2018 and before December 1, 2017 2018 will not be prorated if the term of the agreement is at least 1 year. Reimbursement under this section shall be made as follows:

(a) All districts, intermediate districts, and authorizing bodies of public school academies seeking reimbursement shall submit requests not later than December 1, 2017 2018 indicating the cost paid for the financial SCHOOL data analytical tool.

(b) The department shall determine the sum of the funding requests under subdivision (a) and, if there are sufficient funds, shall pay 1/2 of the costs submitted under subdivision (a). If there are insufficient funds to pay 1/2 of the costs submitted under (a), then reimbursement shall be made on an equal percentage basis.

(c) Funds remaining after the calculation and payment under subdivision (b) shall be distributed on an equal per‑pupil basis, with an intermediate district’s pupils considered to be the sum of the pupil memberships of the constituent districts for which the intermediate district is purchasing the financial SCHOOL data analytical tool, and with an authorizing body’s pupils considered to be the sum of the pupil memberships of the public school academies authorized by the authorizing body for which the authorizing body is purchasing the financial SCHOOL data analytical tool.

(d) The reimbursement to a district, intermediate district, or authorizing body of a public school academy shall not be greater than the amount paid for a data analytics application.

(e) A district, intermediate district, or authorizing body of a public school academy shall not be reimbursed for the purchase of more than 1 software application.

(4) If an intermediate district purchases both a school data analytical tool specifically for intermediate district finances and a school data analytical tool for those constituent districts that opt in, the intermediate district shall be reimbursed for both purchases under this section.

(5) If an intermediate district makes available to 1 or more of its constituent districts a school data analytical tool funded under this section, that constituent district shall not be reimbursed under this section for the purchase of that school data analytical tool if the constituent district has opted in for that tool.

(6) If an authorizing body of a public school academy makes available to 1 or more public school academies a school data analytical tool funded under this section, the public school academy shall not be reimbursed under this section for the purchase of a school data analytical tool if the public school academy opted in for that tool.

(7) Notwithstanding section 17b, payments under this section shall be made on a schedule determined by the department.

Sec. 104. (1) In order to receive state aid under this article, a district shall comply with sections 1249, 1278a, 1278b, 1279, 1279g, and 1280b of the revised school code, MCL 380.1249, 380.1278a, 380.1278b, 380.1279, 380.1279g, and 380.1280b, and 1970 PA 38, MCL 388.1081 to 388.1086. Subject to subsection (2), from the state school aid fund money appropriated in section 11, there is allocated for 2017‑2018 an amount not to exceed $34,709,400.00 $29,709,400.00 AND THERE IS ALLOCATED FOR 2018‑2019 AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $32,509,400.00 for payments on behalf of districts for costs associated with complying with those provisions of law. In addition, from the federal funds appropriated in section 11, there is allocated EACH FISCAL YEAR for 2017‑2018 AND FOR 2018‑2019 an amount estimated at $6,250,000.00, funded from DED‑OESE, title VI, state assessment funds, and from DED‑OSERS, section 504 of part B of the individuals with disabilities education act, Public Law 94‑142, plus any carryover federal funds from previous year appropriations, for the purposes of complying with the federal no child left behind act of 2001, Public Law 107‑110, or the every student succeeds act, Public Law 114‑95.

(2) The results of each test administered as part of the Michigan student test of educational progress (M‑STEP), including tests administered to high school students, shall include an item analysis that lists all items that are counted for individual pupil scores and the percentage of pupils choosing each possible response. The department shall work with the center to identify the number of students enrolled at the time assessments are given by each district. In calculating the percentage of pupils assessed for a district’s scorecard, the department shall use only the number of pupils enrolled in the district at the time the district administers the assessments and shall exclude pupils who enroll in the district after the district administers the assessments.

(3) All federal funds allocated under this section shall be distributed in accordance with federal law and with flexibility provisions outlined in Public Law 107‑116, and in the education flexibility partnership act of 1999, Public Law 106‑25.

(4) From the funds allocated in subsection (1), there is allocated an amount not to exceed $1,000,000.00 for 2017‑2018 AND AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $1,500,000.00 FOR 2018‑2019 to an intermediate district described in this subsection to implement a Michigan kindergarten entry observation tool in 2017–2018 AND 2018‑2019. The funding under this subsection is allocated to an intermediate district in prosperity region 9 with at least 3,000 kindergarten pupils enrolled in its constituent districts to continue participation in the Maryland‑Ohio pilot and cover the costs of implementing the pilot observation tool, including a contract with a university for implementation of the pilot observation tool ALSO REFERRED TO AS THE KINDERGARTEN READINESS ASSESSMENT. The intermediate district shall continue implementation of the 2016‑2017 pilot study with existing participating intermediate districts during the 20172018 school year. The Michigan KINDERGARTEN ENTRY OBSERVATION (MKEO) AND THE kindergarten entry observation READINESS ASSESSMENT shall be conducted in all kindergarten classrooms in districts located in prosperity regions 4, 5, and 9 beginning in August 2018 AND, BEGINNING AUGUST 1, 2019, IN DISTRICTS LOCATED IN PROSPERITY REGIONS 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, AND 9. A constituent district of an intermediate district located within THESE prosperity region 4, 5, or 9 REGIONS shall administer the Maryland‑Ohio tool within each kindergarten classroom to either the full census of kindergarten pupils or a representative sample of not less than 35% of the enrolled kindergarten pupils in each classroom. The intermediate district receiving the funding allocated under this subsection shall work with other intermediate districts to implement the Michigan kindergarten entry observation, engage with the office of great start and the department, and provide a report to the legislature on the demonstrated readiness of kindergarten pupils within the participating intermediate districts. That intermediate district may share this funding with the other affected intermediate districts and districts. Allowable costs under this subsection include those incurred in July, August, and September 2017 as well as those incurred in 2017‑2018. As used in this subsection, “kindergarten” may include a classroom for young 5‑year‑olds, commonly referred to as “young 5s” or “developmental kindergarten”. The department shall approve the language and literacy domain within the Maryland‑Ohio tool, also referred to as the “Kindergarten Readiness Assessment”, for use by districts as an initial assessment that may be delivered to all kindergarten students to assist with identifying any possible area of concern for a student in English language arts.

(5) The department shall continue to make the kindergarten entry assessment developed by the department and field tested in 2015‑2016 available to districts in 2017‑2018.

(6) The department may recommend, but may not require, districts to allow pupils to use an external keyboard with tablet devices for online M‑STEP testing, including, but not limited to, open‑ended test items such as constructed response or equation builder items.

(7) Notwithstanding section 17b, payments on behalf of districts, intermediate districts, and other eligible entities under this section shall be paid on a schedule determined by the department.

(8) From the allocation in subsection (1), there is allocated an amount not to exceed $3,200,000.00 FOR 2017‑2018 AND AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $500,000.00 FOR 2018‑2019 for the development or selection of an online reporting tool to provide student‑level assessment data in a secure environment to educators, parents, and pupils immediately after assessments are scored. The department and the center shall ensure that any data collected by the online reporting tool do not provide individually identifiable student data to the federal government.

(9) As used in this section:

(a) “DED” means the United States Department of Education.

(b) “DED‑OESE” means the DED Office of Elementary and Secondary Education.

(c) “DED‑OSERS” means the DED Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services.

Sec. 104b. (1) In order to receive state aid under this article, a district shall comply with this section and shall administer the Michigan merit examination to pupils in grade 11, and to pupils in grade 12 who did not take the complete Michigan merit examination in grade 11, as provided in this section. The Michigan merit examination consists of a college entrance test, work skills test, and the summative assessment known as the Michigan student test of educational progress (M‑STEP).

(2) For the purposes of this section, the department of technology, management, and budget shall contract with 1 or more providers to develop, supply, and score the Michigan merit examination. The Michigan merit examination shall consist of all of the following:

(a) Assessment instruments that measure English language arts, mathematics, reading, and science, and are used by the majority of colleges and universities in this state for entrance purposes. This may include 1 or more writing components. In selecting assessment instruments to fulfill the requirements of this subdivision, the department may consider the degree to which those assessment instruments are aligned to this state’s content standards.

(b) One or more tests from 1 or more test developers that assess a pupil’s ability to apply at least reading and mathematics skills in a manner that is intended to allow employers to use the results in making employment decisions. The department of technology, management, and budget and the superintendent shall ensure that any test or tests selected under this subdivision have all the components necessary to allow a pupil to be eligible to receive the results of a nationally recognized evaluation of workforce readiness if the pupil’s test performance is adequate.

(c) A social studies component.

(d) Any other component that is necessary to obtain the approval of the United States Department of Education to use the Michigan merit examination for the purposes of the no child left behind act of 2001, Public Law 107‑110, or the every student succeeds act, Public Law 114‑95.

(3) In addition to all other requirements of this section, all of the following apply to the Michigan merit examination:

(a) The department of technology, management, and budget and the superintendent shall ensure that any contractor used for scoring the Michigan merit examination supplies an individual report for each pupil that will identify for the pupil’s parents and teachers whether the pupil met expectations or failed to meet expectations for each standard, to allow the pupil’s parents and teachers to assess and remedy problems before the pupil moves to the next grade.

(b) The department of technology, management, and budget and the superintendent shall ensure that any contractor used for scoring, developing, or processing the Michigan merit examination meets quality management standards commonly used in the assessment industry, including at least meeting level 2 of the capability maturity model developed by the Software Engineering Institute of Carnegie Mellon University for the first year the Michigan merit examination is offered to all grade 11 pupils and at least meeting level 3 of the capability maturity model for subsequent years.

(c) The department of technology, management, and budget and the superintendent shall ensure that any contract for scoring, administering, or developing the Michigan merit examination includes specific deadlines for all steps of the assessment process, including, but not limited to, deadlines for the correct testing materials to be supplied to schools and for the correct results to be returned to schools, and includes penalties for noncompliance with these deadlines.

(d) The superintendent shall ensure that the Michigan merit examination meets all of the following:

(i) Is designed to test pupils on this state’s content standards in all subjects tested.

(ii) Complies with requirements of the no child left behind act of 2001, Public Law 107‑110 or the every student succeeds act, Public Law 114‑95.

(iii) Is consistent with the code of fair testing practices in education prepared by the Joint Committee on Testing Practices of the American Psychological Association.

(iv) Is factually accurate. If the superintendent determines that a question is not factually accurate and should be excluded from scoring, the state board and the superintendent shall ensure that the question is excluded from scoring.

(4) A district shall include on each pupil’s high school transcript all of the following:

(a) For each high school graduate who has completed the Michigan merit examination under this section, the pupil’s scaled score on each subject area component of the Michigan merit examination.

(b) The number of school days the pupil was in attendance at school each school year during high school and the total number of school days in session for each of those school years.

(5) The superintendent shall work with the provider or providers of the Michigan merit examination to produce Michigan merit examination subject area scores for each pupil participating in the Michigan merit examination. To the extent that the department determines that additional test items beyond those included in the college entrance component of the Michigan merit examination are required in a particular subject area, the department shall ensure that all test items in that subject area are scaled and merged for the purposes of producing a Michigan merit examination subject area score. The superintendent shall design and distribute to districts, intermediate districts, and nonpublic schools a simple and concise document that describes the scoring for each subject area and indicates the scaled score ranges for each subject area.

(6) The Michigan merit examination shall be administered in each district during the last 12 weeks of the district’s school year. The superintendent shall ensure that the Michigan merit examination is scored and the scores are returned to pupils, their parents or legal guardians, and districts not later than the beginning of the pupil’s first semester of grade 12. The returned scores shall indicate at least the pupil’s scaled score for each subject area component and the range of scaled scores for each subject area. In reporting the scores to pupils, parents, and schools, the superintendent shall provide standards‑specific, meaningful, and timely feedback on the pupil’s performance on the Michigan merit examination.

(7) A district shall administer the complete Michigan merit examination to a pupil only once and shall not administer the complete Michigan merit examination to the same pupil more than once. If a pupil does not take the complete Michigan merit examination in grade 11, the district shall administer the complete Michigan merit examination to the pupil in grade 12. If a pupil chooses to retake the college entrance examination component of the Michigan merit examination, as described in subsection (2)(a), the pupil may do so through the provider of the college entrance examination component and the cost of the retake is the responsibility of the pupil unless all of the following are met:

(a) The pupil has taken the complete Michigan merit examination.

(b) The pupil meets the income eligibility criteria for free breakfast, lunch, or milk, as determined under the Richard B. Russell national school lunch act, 42 USC 1751 to 1769i.

(c) The pupil has applied to the provider of the college entrance examination component for a scholarship or fee waiver to cover the cost of the retake and that application has been denied.

(d) After taking the complete Michigan merit examination, the pupil has not already received a free retake of the college entrance examination component paid for either by this state or through a scholarship or fee waiver by the provider.

(8) The superintendent shall ensure that the length of the Michigan merit examination and the combined total time necessary to administer all of the components of the Michigan merit examination are the shortest possible that will still maintain the degree of reliability and validity of the Michigan merit examination results determined necessary by the superintendent. The superintendent shall ensure that the maximum total combined length of time that schools are required to set aside for pupils to answer all test questions on the Michigan merit examination does not exceed 8 hours if the superintendent determines that sufficient alignment to applicable Michigan merit curriculum content standards can be achieved within that time limit.

(9) A district shall provide accommodations to a pupil with disabilities for the Michigan merit examination, as provided under section 504 of title V of the rehabilitation act of 1973, 29 USC 794; subtitle A of title II of the Americans with disabilities act of 1990, 42 USC 12131 to 12134; the individuals with disabilities education act amendments of 1997, Public Law 105‑17; and the implementing regulations for those statutes. The provider or providers of the Michigan merit examination and the superintendent shall mutually agree upon the accommodations to be provided under this subsection.

(10) To the greatest extent possible, the Michigan merit examination shall be based on this state’s content standards, as appropriate. Annually, after each administration of the Michigan merit examination, the department shall provide a report of the points per standard so that teachers will know what content will be covered within the Michigan merit examination. The department may augment the college entrance and work skills components of the Michigan merit examination to develop the assessment, depending on the alignment of those components to this state’s content standards. If these components do not align to these standards, the department shall produce additional components as required by law, while minimizing the amount of time needed for assessments.

(11) A child who is a student in a nonpublic school or home school may take the Michigan merit examination under this section. To take the Michigan merit examination, a child who is a student in a home school shall contact the district in which the child resides, and that district shall administer the Michigan merit examination, or the child may take the Michigan merit examination at a nonpublic school if allowed by the nonpublic school. Upon request from a nonpublic school, the superintendent shall direct the provider or providers to supply the Michigan merit examination to the nonpublic school and the nonpublic school may administer the Michigan merit examination. If a district administers the Michigan merit examination under this subsection to a child who is not enrolled in the district, the scores for that child are not considered for any purpose to be scores of a pupil of the district.

(12) In contracting under subsection (2), the department of technology, management, and budget shall consider a contractor that provides electronically‑scored essays with the ability to score constructed response feedback in multiple languages and provide ongoing instruction and feedback.

(13) The purpose of the Michigan merit examination is to assess pupil performance in mathematics, science, social studies, and English language arts for the purpose of improving academic achievement and establishing a statewide standard of competency. The assessment under this section provides a common measure of data that will contribute to the improvement of Michigan schools’ curriculum and instruction by encouraging alignment with Michigan’s curriculum framework standards and promotes pupil participation in higher level mathematics, science, social studies, and English language arts courses. These standards are based upon the expectations of what pupils should learn through high school and are aligned with national standards.

(14) For a pupil enrolled in a middle college program, other than a middle college operated as a shared educational entity or a specialized shared educational entity, if the pupil receives at least 50% of his or her instruction at the high school while in grade 11, the Michigan merit examination shall be administered to the pupil at the high school at which the pupil receives high school instruction, and the department shall include the pupil’s scores on the Michigan merit examination in the scores for that high school for all purposes for which a school’s or district’s results are reported. The department shall allow the middle college program to use a 5‑year graduation rate for determining adequate yearly progress. As used in this subsection, “middle college” means a program consisting of a series of courses and other requirements and conditions, including an early college or other program created under a memorandum of understanding, that allows a pupil to graduate from high school with both a high school diploma and a certificate or degree from a community college or state public university.

(15) As used in this section:

(a) “English language arts” means reading and writing.

(b) “Social studies” means United States history, world history, world geography, economics, and American government.

(16) FOR EACH REPORT MADE BY THE DEPARTMENT THAT INCLUDES THE STATEWIDE ASSESSMENT RESULTS FOR A SCHOOL BUILDING, THE DEPARTMENT SHALL INCLUDE THE SCORES FOR THE STATEWIDE ASSESSMENT AND THE GRADUATION RATE FOR CONSORTIUM PUPILS WITH THE SCORES FOR THE SCHOOL BUILDING IN THE PARTICIPATING DISTRICT IN WHICH THE CONSORTIUM PUPIL IS ENROLLED OR WOULD OTHERWISE ATTEND. THE STATEWIDE ASSESSMENT FOR A CONSORTIUM PUPIL MAY BE ADMINISTERED EITHER AT THE CONSORTIUM LOCATION OR AT THE SCHOOL BUILDING IN THE PARTICIPATING DISTRICT IN WHICH THE CONSORTIUM PUPIL IS ENROLLED OR WOULD OTHERWISE ATTEND. FOR THE PURPOSES OF THIS SUBSECTION, A CONSORTIUM PUPIL IS A PUPIL WHO IS ENROLLED OR PARTICIPATING IN A PARTICIPATING DISTRICT IN A SCHOOL OR PROGRAM OPERATED AS A CONSORTIUM OR UNDER A COOPERATIVE ARRANGEMENT FORMED BY 2 OR MORE DISTRICTS OR INTERMEDIATE DISTRICTS, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, A CONSORTIUM OR COOPERATIVE ARRANGEMENT OPERATED AS A PROGRAM, A SHARED EDUCATIONAL ENTITY, A SPECIALIZED EDUCATIONAL ENTITY, OR A SPECIAL EDUCATION CENTER PROGRAM.

Sec. 104c. (1) In order to receive state aid under this article, a district shall administer the state assessments described in this section.

(2) For the purposes of this section, the department shall develop for use in the spring of 2015‑2016 AND ADMINISTER the Michigan student test of educational progress (M‑STEP) assessments in English language arts and mathematics. These assessments shall be aligned to state standards.

(3) For the purposes of this section, the department shall implement a summative assessment system that is proven to be valid and reliable for administration to pupils as provided under this subsection. The summative assessment system shall meet all of the following requirements:

(a) The summative assessment system shall measure student proficiency on the current state standards, shall measure student growth for consecutive grade levels in which students are assessed in the same subject area in both grade levels, and shall be capable of measuring individual student performance.

(b) The summative assessments for English language arts and mathematics shall be administered to all public school pupils in grades 3 to 11, including those pupils as required by the federal individuals with disabilities education act, Public Law 108‑446, and by title I of the federal every student succeeds act (ESSA), Public Law 114‑95.

(c) The summative assessments for science shall be administered to all public school pupils in at least grades 4 and 7, 5 AND 8, including those pupils as required by the federal individuals with disabilities education act, Public Law 108‑446, and by title I of the federal every student succeeds act (ESSA), Public Law 114‑95.

(d) The summative assessments for social studies shall be administered to all public school pupils in at least grades 5 and 8, including those pupils as required by the federal individuals with disabilities education act, Public Law 108‑446, and by title I of the federal every student succeeds act (ESSA), Public Law 114‑95.

(e) The content of the summative assessments shall be aligned to state standards.

(f) The pool of questions for the summative assessments shall be subject to a transparent review process for quality, bias, and sensitive issues involving educator review and comment. The department shall post samples from tests or retired tests featuring questions from this pool for review by the public.

(g) The summative assessment system shall ensure that students, parents, and teachers are provided with reports that convey individual student proficiency and growth on the assessment and that convey individual student domain‑level performance in each subject area, including representative questions, and individual student performance in meeting state standards.

(h) The summative assessment system shall be capable of providing, and the department shall ensure that students, parents, teachers, administrators, and community members are provided with, reports that convey aggregate student proficiency and growth data by teacher, grade, school, and district.

(i) The summative assessment system shall ensure the capability of reporting the available data to support educator evaluations.

(j) The summative assessment system shall ensure that the reports provided to districts containing individual student data are available within 60 days after completion of the assessments.

(k) The summative assessment system shall ensure that access to individually identifiable student data meets all of the following:

(i) Is in compliance with 20 USC 1232g, commonly referred to as the family educational rights and privacy act of 1974.

(ii) Except as may be provided for in an agreement with a vendor to provide assessment services, as necessary to support educator evaluations pursuant to subdivision (i), or for research or program evaluation purposes, is available only to the student; to the student’s parent or legal guardian; and to a school administrator or teacher, to the extent that he or she has a legitimate educational interest.

(l) The summative assessment system shall ensure that the assessments are pilot tested before statewide implementation.

(m) The summative assessment system shall ensure that assessments are designed so that the maximum total combined length of time that schools are required to set aside for a pupil to answer all test questions on all assessments that are part of the system for the pupil’s grade level does not exceed that maximum total combined length of time for the previous statewide assessment system or 9 hours, whichever is less. This subdivision does not limit the amount of time a district may allow a pupil to complete a test.

(n) The total cost of executing the summative assessment system statewide each year, including, but not limited to, the cost of contracts for administration, scoring, and reporting, shall not exceed an amount equal to 2 times the cost of executing the previous statewide assessment after adjustment for inflation.

(o) Beginning with the 2017‑2018 school year, the summative assessment system shall not require more than 3 hours in duration, on average, for an individual pupil to complete the combined administration of the math and English language arts portions of the assessment for any 1 grade level.

(P) THE SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENTS FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS AND MATHEMATICS FOR PUPILS IN GRADES 8 TO 10 MUST BE ALIGNED TO THE COLLEGE ENTRANCE TEST PORTION OF THE MICHIGAN MERIT EXAMINATION REQUIRED UNDER SECTION 104B.

(4) In an effort to develop a cohesive state assessment system, the department shall implement a request for information process for a common formative assessment system that is fully aligned to this state’s content standards for English language arts and mathematics. The department may use information compiled from a request for proposal in 2016‑2017 to satisfy this request.

(4) (5) Beginning in the 20152016 school year, the THE department shall field test OFFER BENCHMARK assessments in the fall and spring of each school year to measure English language arts and mathematics in each of grades K to 2. for full implementation when the assessments have been successfully field tested. This full FULL implementation shall occur not later than the 2018‑2019 school year. These assessments are necessary to determine a pupil’s proficiency level before grade 3.

(6) Not later than November 1, 2017, the department shall issue a request for information for not less than 3 benchmark assessments that each meet all of the following:

(a) Assesses all of grades 3 through 7 in math and English language arts.

(b) Is aligned with this state’s content standards such that items were written for this state’s content standards.

(c) Is computer adaptive above and below grade level.

(d) Produces a pupil’s results in not more than 48 hours from the time the benchmark assessment is administered.

(e) Is self‑scoring.

(f) Aligns to this state’s content standards.

(g) Measures the academic growth of pupils and provides an estimate for adequate yearly growth.

(h) Demonstrates validity and reliability as appropriate for a computer adaptive assessment.

(i) Is provided by a vendor that is willing to negotiate a discounted state rate for pricing.

(7) Not later than March 1, 2018 and in consultation with experts in the field of education and educational assessment measurement, the department shall approve at least 3 benchmark assessments that were included in a response to the request for information under subsection (6) and meet the requirements described in subsection (6).

(8) The department shall use the responses to the request for information to create a benchmark assessment budget request for the 2018‑2019 fiscal year.

(5) (9) This section does not prohibit districts from adopting interim assessments.

(6) (10) As used in this section, “English language arts” means that term as defined in section 104b.

Sec. 104d. (1) From the state school aid fund money appropriated in section 11, there is allocated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 an amount not to exceed $4,000,000.00 $9,200,000.00 for providing reimbursement to districts that purchase a computer‑adaptive test, or that purchase 1 or more diagnostic tools , OR screening tools , or benchmark assessments for pupils in grades K to 3 that are intended to increase reading proficiency by grade 4, OR THAT PURCHASE BENCHMARK ASSESSMENTS FOR PUPILS IN GRADES K TO 8.

(2) In order to receive reimbursement under this section for the purchase of a computer‑adaptive test, the computer‑adaptive test must provide for at least all of the following:

(a) Internet‑delivered, standards‑based assessment using a computer‑adaptive model to target the instructional level of each pupil.

(b) Unlimited testing opportunities throughout the 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 school year.

(c) Valid and reliable diagnostic assessment data.

(d) Adjustment of testing difficulty based on previous answers to test questions.

(e) Immediate feedback to pupils and teachers.

(3) In order to receive reimbursement under this section for the purchase of 1 or more diagnostic tools or screening tools for pupils in grades K to 3, each of the tools must meet all of the following:

(a) Be reliable.

(b) Be valid.

(c) Be useful. As used in this subdivision, “useful” means that a tool is easy to administer and requires a short time to complete and that results are linked to intervention.

(4) In order to receive funding under this section for the purchase of 1 or more benchmark assessments for pupils in grades K to 3, each of 8, the benchmark assessments must meet all of the following:

(a) Be aligned to the state standards of this state.

(b) Complement this state’s summative assessment system.

(c) Be administered at least once a year before the administration of any summative assessment to monitor pupil progress.

(d) Provide information on pupil achievement with regard to learning the content required in a given year or grade span.

(5) Reimbursement under this section shall be made to eligible districts that purchase a computer‑adaptive test or 1 or more diagnostic tools, screening tools, or benchmark assessments described in this section by October 15, 2017 2018 and shall be made on an equal per‑pupil basis according to the available funding, based on the number of pupils for whom assessments were purchased.

(6) In order to receive reimbursement under this section, a district shall demonstrate to the satisfaction of the department that each qualifying computer‑adaptive test, diagnostic tool, screening tool, or benchmark assessment was purchased by the district by December 1, 2017.2018 AND SHALL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT WHICH TESTS, TOOLS, AND ASSESSMENTS THE DISTRICT PURCHASED.

(7) NOT LATER THAN FEBRUARY 1, 2019, THE DEPARTMENT SHALL COMPILE THE DATA PROVIDED BY DISTRICTS UNDER SUBSECTION (6) AND REPORT TO THE HOUSE AND SENATE APPROPRIATIONS SUBCOMMITTEES ON SCHOOL AID AND THE HOUSE AND SENATE FISCAL AGENCIES THE NUMBER OF DISTRICTS THAT PURCHASED EACH TEST, TOOL, AND ASSESSMENT.

(8) DISTRICTS SEEKING REIMBURSEMENT UNDER THIS SECTION FOR A BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT SHALL COMMIT TO USING THE SAME BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT FOR NO LESS THAN 3 YEARS WITHOUT SWITCHING TO ANOTHER BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT.

Sec. 104e. (1) From the general fund appropriation in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $250,000.00 for the implementation of an assessment digital literacy preparation pilot project for pupils enrolled in grades K to 8 FOR 2017‑2018. The department shall ensure that a pilot project funded under this subsection satisfies all of the following:

(a) Is available to districts in the 2017‑2018 school year.

(b) Focuses on ensuring pupils have the necessary skills required for state online assessments by assessing pupil digital literacy skill levels and providing teachers with a digital curriculum targeted at areas of determined weakness.

(c) Allows pupils to engage with the digital curriculum in an independent or teacher‑facilitated modality.

(d) Includes training and professional development for teachers.

(e) Is implemented in at least 220 50 districts that operate grades K to 8 and that represent a diverse geography and socio‑economic demographic.

(2) Funding under subsection (1) shall be allocated to a district that operates at least grades K to 8 and has a partnership with a third party that is experienced in the assessment of digital literacy and the preparation of digital literacy skills and has demonstrable experience serving districts in this state and local education agencies in other states. The district, along with its third‑party partner, shall provide a report to the house and senate appropriations subcommittees on school aid and the house and senate fiscal agencies on the efficacy and usefulness of the assessment digital literacy preparation pilot project no later than September 30, 2018.APRIL 1, 2019.

(3) Notwithstanding section 17b, payments under subsection (1) shall be made in a manner determined by the department.

Sec. 107. (1) From the appropriation in section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $27,000,000.00 for 2017‑2018 $30,000,000.00 FOR 2018‑2019 for adult education programs authorized under this section. Except as otherwise provided under subsections (14) , (15), and (19), AND (15), funds allocated under this section are restricted for adult education programs as authorized under this section only. A recipient of funds under this section shall not use those funds for any other purpose.

(2) To be eligible for funding under this section, an eligible adult education provider shall employ certificated teachers and qualified administrative staff and shall offer continuing education opportunities for teachers to allow them to maintain certification.

(3) To be eligible to be a participant funded under this section, an individual shall be enrolled in an adult basic education program, an adult secondary education program, an adult English as a second language program, a high school equivalency test preparation program, or a high school completion program, that meets the requirements of this section, and for which instruction is provided, and THE INDIVIDUAL shall meet either of the following:

(a) Has attained 20 years of age.

(b) Has attained 18 years of age and the individual’s graduating class has graduated.BE AT LEAST 18 YEARS OF AGE AND THE INDIVIDUAL’S GRADUATING CLASS SHALL HAVE GRADUATED.

(4) By April 1 of each fiscal year, the intermediate districts within a prosperity region or subregion shall determine which intermediate district will serve as the prosperity region’s or subregion’s fiscal agent for the next fiscal year and shall notify the department in a form and manner determined by the department. The department shall approve or disapprove of the prosperity region’s or subregion’s selected fiscal agent. From the funds allocated under subsection (1), an amount as determined under this subsection shall be allocated to each intermediate district serving as a fiscal agent for adult education programs in each of the prosperity regions or subregions identified by the department. An intermediate district shall not use more than 5% of the funds allocated under this subsection for administration costs for serving as the fiscal agent. Beginning in 2014‑2015, 67% of the allocation provided to each intermediate district serving as a fiscal agent shall be based on the proportion of total funding formerly received by the adult education providers in that prosperity region or subregion in 2013‑2014, and 33% shall be allocated based on the factors in subdivisions (a), (b), and (c). For 2018‑2019, 33% of the allocation provided to each intermediate district serving as a fiscal agent shall be based upon the proportion of total funding formerly received by the adult education providers in that prosperity region in 2013‑2014 and 67% of the allocation shall be based upon the factors in subdivisions (a), (b), and (c). HOWEVER, IF THE ALLOCATION TO AN INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT AS CALCULATED UNDER THE PRECEDING SENTENCE IS LESS THAN THE AMOUNT RECEIVED BY THE INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT UNDER THIS SUBSECTION FOR 2017‑2018, THE INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT SHALL INSTEAD RECEIVE IN 2018‑2019 AN AMOUNT EQUAL TO WHAT THE INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT RECEIVED IN 2017‑2018. Beginning in 2019‑2020, 100% of the allocation provided to each intermediate district serving as a fiscal agent shall be based on the factors in subdivisions (a), (b), and (c). EQUAL TO WHAT THE INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT RECEIVED IN 2018‑2019. The funding factors for this section are as follows:

(a) Sixty percent of this portion of the funding shall be distributed based upon the proportion of the state population of individuals between the ages of 18 and 24 that are not high school graduates that resides in each of the prosperity regions or subregions, as reported by the most recent 5‑year estimates from the American community survey COMMUNITY SURVEY (ACS) from the United States Census Bureau.

(b) Thirty‑five percent of this portion of the funding shall be distributed based upon the proportion of the state population of individuals age 25 or older who are not high school graduates that resides in each of the prosperity regions or subregions, as reported by the most recent 5‑year estimates from the American community survey COMMUNITY SURVEY (ACS) from the United States Census Bureau.

(c) Five percent of this portion of the funding shall be distributed based upon the proportion of the state population of individuals age 18 or older who lack basic English language proficiency that resides in each of the prosperity regions or subregions, as reported by the most recent 5‑year estimates from the American community survey COMMUNITY SURVEY (ACS) from the United States Census Bureau.

(5) To be an eligible fiscal agent, an intermediate district must agree to do the following in a form and manner determined by the department:

(a) Distribute funds to adult education programs in a prosperity region or subregion as described in this section.

(b) Collaborate with the talent district career AND EDUCATIONAL ADVISORY council, which is an advisory council of the workforce development boards located in the prosperity region or subregion, or its successor, to develop a regional strategy that aligns adult education programs and services into an efficient and effective delivery system for adult education learners, with special consideration for providing contextualized learning and career pathways and addressing barriers to education and employment.

(c) Collaborate with the talent district career AND EDUCATIONAL ADVISORY council, which is an advisory council of the workforce development boards located in the prosperity region or subregion, or its successor, to create a local process and criteria that will identify eligible adult education providers to receive funds allocated under this section based on location, demand for services, past performance, quality indicators as identified by the department, and cost to provide instructional services. The fiscal agent shall determine all local processes, criteria, and provider determinations. However, the local processes, criteria, and provider services must be approved by the department before funds may be distributed to the fiscal agent.

(d) Provide oversight to its adult education providers throughout the program year to ensure compliance with the requirements of this section.

(e) Report adult education program and participant data and information as prescribed by the department.

(6) An adult basic education program, an adult secondary education program, or an adult English as a second language program operated on a year‑round or school year basis may be funded under this section, subject to all of the following:

(a) The program enrolls adults who are determined by a department‑approved assessment, in a form and manner prescribed by the department, to be below twelfth grade level in reading or mathematics, or both, or to lack basic English proficiency.

(b) The program tests individuals for eligibility under subdivision (a) before enrollment and upon completion of the program in compliance with the state‑approved assessment policy.

(c) A participant in an adult basic education program is eligible for reimbursement until 1 of the following occurs:

(i) The participant’s reading and mathematics proficiency are assessed at or above the ninth grade level.

(ii) The participant fails to show progress on 2 successive assessments after having completed at least 450 hours of instruction.

(d) A participant in an adult secondary education program is eligible for reimbursement until 1 of the following occurs:

(i) The participant’s reading and mathematics proficiency are assessed above the twelfth grade level.

(ii) The participant fails to show progress on 2 successive assessments after having at least 450 hours of instruction.

(e) A funding recipient enrolling a participant in an English as a second language program is eligible for funding according to subsection (9) until the participant meets 1 of the following:

(i) The participant is assessed as having attained basic English proficiency as determined by a department‑approved assessment.

(ii) The participant fails to show progress on 2 successive department‑approved assessments after having completed at least 450 hours of instruction. The department shall provide information to a funding recipient regarding appropriate assessment instruments for this program.

(7) A high school equivalency test preparation program operated on a year‑round or school year basis may be funded under this section, subject to all of the following:

(a) The program enrolls adults who do not have a high school diploma or a high school equivalency certificate.

(b) The program shall administer a pre‑test approved by the department before enrolling an individual to determine the individual’s literacy levels, shall administer a high school equivalency practice test to determine the individual’s potential for success on the high school equivalency test, and shall administer a post‑test upon completion of the program in compliance with the state‑approved assessment policy.

(c) A funding recipient shall receive funding according to subsection (9) for a participant, and a participant may be enrolled in the program until 1 of the following occurs:

(i) The participant achieves a high school equivalency certificate.

(ii) The participant fails to show progress on 2 successive department‑approved assessments used to determine readiness to take a high school equivalency test after having completed at least 450 hours of instruction.

(8) A high school completion program operated on a year‑round or school year basis may be funded under this section, subject to all of the following:

(a) The program enrolls adults who do not have a high school diploma.

(b) The program tests participants described in subdivision (a) before enrollment and upon completion of the program in compliance with the state‑approved assessment policy.

(c) A funding recipient shall receive funding according to subsection (9) for a participant in a course offered under this subsection until 1 of the following occurs:

(i) The participant passes the course and earns a high school diploma.

(ii) The participant fails to earn credit in 2 successive semesters or terms in which the participant is enrolled after having completed at least 900 hours of instruction.

(9) A funding recipient shall receive payments under this section in accordance with all of the following:

(a) Statewide allocation criteria, including 3‑year average enrollments, census data, and local needs.

(b) Participant completion of the adult basic education objectives by achieving an educational gain as determined by the national reporting system levels; for achieving basic English proficiency, as determined by the department; for achieving a high school equivalency certificate or passage of 1 or more individual high school equivalency tests; for attainment of a high school diploma or passage of a course required for a participant to attain a high school diploma; for enrollment in a postsecondary institution, or for entry into or retention of employment, as applicable.

(c) Participant completion of core indicators as identified in the innovation and opportunity act.

(d) Allowable expenditures.

(10) A person who is not eligible to be a participant funded under this section may receive adult education services upon the payment of tuition. In addition, a person who is not eligible to be served in a program under this section due to the program limitations specified in subsection (6), (7), or (8) may continue to receive adult education services in that program upon the payment of tuition. The tuition level shall be determined by the local or intermediate district conducting the program.

(11) An individual who is an inmate in a state correctional facility shall not be counted as a participant under this section.

(12) A funding recipient shall not commingle money received under this section or from another source for adult education purposes with any other funds and shall establish a separate ledger account for funds received under this section. This subsection does not prohibit a district from using general funds of the district to support an adult education or community education program.

(13) A funding recipient receiving funds under this section may establish a sliding scale of tuition rates based upon a participant’s family income. A funding recipient may charge a participant tuition to receive adult education services under this section from that sliding scale of tuition rates on a uniform basis. The amount of tuition charged per participant shall not exceed the actual operating cost per participant minus any funds received under this section per participant. A funding recipient may not charge a participant tuition under this section if the participant’s income is at or below 200% of the federal poverty guidelines published by the United States Department of Health and Human Services.

(14) In order to receive funds under this section, a funding recipient shall furnish to the department, in a form and manner determined by the department, all information needed to administer this program and meet federal reporting requirements; shall allow the department or the department’s designee to review all records related to the program for which it receives funds; and shall reimburse the state for all disallowances found in the review, as determined by the department. In addition, a funding recipient shall agree to pay to a career and technical education program under section 61a the amount of funding received under this section in the proportion of career and technical education coursework used to satisfy adult basic education programming, as billed to the funding recipient by programs operating under section 61a. IN ADDITION TO THE FUNDING ALLOCATED UNDER SUBSECTION (1), THERE IS ALLOCATED AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $500,000.00 TO REIMBURSE FUNDING RECIPIENTS FOR ADMINISTRATIVE AND INSTRUCTIONAL EXPENSES ASSOCIATED WITH COMMINGLING PROGRAMMING UNDER THIS SECTION AND SECTION 61A. PAYMENTS MADE TO EACH FUNDING RECIPIENT SHALL BE IN THE SAME PROPORTION AS FUNDING CALCULATED AND ALLOCATED UNDER SUBSECTION (4).

(15) From the amount appropriated in subsection (1), an amount not to exceed $500,000.00 shall be allocated for 2017‑2018 to not more than 1 pilot program that is located in a prosperity region with 2 or more subregions and that connects adult education participants directly with employers by linking adult education, career and technical skills, and workforce development. To be eligible for funding under this subsection, a pilot program shall provide a collaboration linking adult education programs within the county, the area career/technical center, and local employers, and shall meet the additional criteria in subsections (16) and (17). Funding under this subsection for 2017‑2018 is for the third of 3 years of funding.

(16) A pilot program funded under subsection (15) shall require adult education staff to work with Michigan works! agency to identify a cohort of participants who are most prepared to successfully enter the workforce. Participants identified under this subsection shall be dually enrolled in adult education programming and at least 1 technical course at the area career/technical center.

(17) A pilot program funded under subsection (15) shall have on staff an adult education navigator who will serve as a caseworker for each participant identified under subsection (16). The navigator shall work with adult education staff and potential employers to design an educational program best suited to the personal and employment needs of the participant, and shall work with human service agencies or other entities to address any barrier in the way of participant access.

(18) Not later than December 1, 2018, the pilot program funded under subsection (15) shall provide to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on school aid, to the senate and house fiscal agencies, and to the state budget director a report detailing number of participants, graduation rates, and a measure of transitioning to employment.

(15) (19) From the amount appropriated in subsection (1), an amount not to exceed $2,000,000.00 $4,000,000.00 shall be allocated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for grants to not more than 5 pilot ADULT EDUCATION OR CAREER TECHNICAL CENTER programs that are additional to the pilot program funded under subsection (15) to THAT connect adult education participants with employers as provided under this subsection. The grant to each eligible pilot program shall be up to $400,000.00. $350,000.00. TO BE ELIGIBLE FOR FUNDING UNDER THIS SUBSECTION, A PROGRAM MUST PROVIDE A COLLABORATION LINKING ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAMS WITHIN THE COUNTY, THE AREA CAREER TECHNICAL CENTER, AND LOCAL EMPLOYERS. To receive funding under this subsection, an eligible pilot program shall satisfy all of the following:

(a) Meets 1 of the following:

(i) Is located in prosperity region 1c.

(ii) Is located in prosperity region 2 and borders prosperity region 4.

(iii) Is located in prosperity region 4a and borders prosperity region 5.

(iv) Is located in prosperity region 5 and borders Lake Huron.

(v) Is located in prosperity region 9 and borders a neighboring state.

(b) Begins operations at the start of the 20172018 school year.

(c) Replicates the pilot program funded under subsection (15).

(d) Meets the requirements under subsections (15), (16), and (17) for a pilot program funded under subsection (15).

(A) SHALL CONNECT ADULT EDUCATION PARTICIPANTS DIRECTLY WITH EMPLOYERS BY LINKING ADULT EDUCATION, CAREER AND TECHNICAL SKILLS, AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT.

(B) SHALL REQUIRE ADULT EDUCATION STAFF TO WORK WITH MICHIGAN WORKS! AGENCY TO IDENTIFY A COHORT OF PARTICIPANTS WHO ARE MOST PREPARED TO SUCCESSFULLY ENTER THE WORKFORCE. PARTICIPANTS IDENTIFIED UNDER THIS SUBSECTION SHALL BE DUALLY ENROLLED IN ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAMMING AND AT LEAST 1 TECHNICAL COURSE AT THE AREA CAREER AND TECHNICAL CENTER.

(C) SHALL HAVE AN INDIVIDUAL STAFFED AS AN ADULT EDUCATION NAVIGATOR WHO WILL SERVE AS A CASEWORKER FOR EACH PARTICIPANT IDENTIFIED UNDER SUBDIVISION (B). THE NAVIGATOR SHALL WORK WITH ADULT EDUCATION STAFF AND POTENTIAL EMPLOYERS TO DESIGN AN EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM BEST SUITED TO THE PERSONAL AND EMPLOYMENT NEEDS OF THE PARTICIPANT AND SHALL WORK WITH HUMAN SERVICE AGENCIES OR OTHER ENTITIES TO ADDRESS ANY BARRIER IN THE WAY OF PARTICIPANT ACCESS.

(16) A PROGRAM THAT WAS A PILOT PROGRAM IN 2017‑2018 AND THAT WAS FUNDED UNDER THIS SECTION IN 2017‑2018 SHALL BE FUNDED IN 2018‑2019 UNLESS THE PROGRAM CEASES OPERATION. THE INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT IN WHICH THAT PILOT PROGRAM WAS FUNDED SHALL BE THE FISCAL AGENT FOR THAT PROGRAM AND SHALL APPLY FOR THAT PROGRAM’S FUNDING UNDER SUBSECTION (15).

(17) EACH PROGRAM FUNDED UNDER SUBSECTION (15) WILL RECEIVE FUNDING FOR 3 YEARS. AFTER 3 YEARS OF OPERATIONS AND FUNDING, A PROGRAM MUST REAPPLY FOR FUNDING.

(18) (20) Not later than December 1, 2018, 2019, a pilot program funded under subsection (19) (15) shall provide a report to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on school aid, to the senate and house fiscal agencies, and to the state budget director identifying the number of participants, graduation rates, and a measure of transition to employment.

(19) (21) The department shall approve at least 3 high school equivalency tests and determine whether a high school equivalency certificate meets the requisite standards for high school equivalency in this state.

(20) (22) As used in this section:

(A) “CAREER AND EDUCATIONAL ADVISORY COUNCIL” MEANS AN ADVISORY COUNCIL TO THE LOCAL WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT BOARDS LOCATED IN A PROSPERITY REGION CONSISTING OF EDUCATIONAL, EMPLOYER, LABOR, AND PARENT REPRESENTATIVES.

(B) (a) “Career pathway” means a combination of rigorous and high‑quality education, training, and other services that comply with all of the following:

(i) Aligns with the skill needs of industries in the economy of this state or in the regional economy involved.

(ii) Prepares an individual to be successful in any of a full range of secondary or postsecondary education options, including apprenticeships registered under the act of August 16, 1937 (commonly known as the “national apprenticeship act”), 29 USC 50 et seq.

(iii) Includes counseling to support an individual in achieving the individual’s education and career goals.

(iv) Includes, as appropriate, education offered concurrently with and in the same context as workforce preparation activities and training for a specific occupation or occupational cluster.

(v) Organizes education, training, and other services to meet the particular needs of an individual in a manner that accelerates the educational and career advancement of the individual to the extent practicable.

(vi) Enables an individual to attain a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent, and at least 1 recognized postsecondary credential.

(vii) Helps an individual enter or advance within a specific occupation or occupational cluster.

(C) (b) “Department” means the department of talent and economic development.

(D) (c) “Eligible adult education provider” means a district, intermediate district, a consortium of districts, a consortium of intermediate districts, or a consortium of districts and intermediate districts that is identified as part of the local process described in subsection (5)(c) and approved by the department.

Sec. 147. (1) The allocation for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for the public school employees’ retirement system pursuant to the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1301 to 38.1437, shall be made using the individual projected benefit entry age normal cost method of valuation and risk assumptions adopted by the public school employees retirement board and the department of technology, management, and budget.

(2) The annual level percentage of payroll contribution rates for the 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 fiscal year, as determined by the retirement system, are estimated as follows:

(a) For public school employees who first worked for a public school reporting unit before July 1, 2010 and who are enrolled in the health premium subsidy, the annual level percentage of payroll contribution rate is estimated at 36.88%, 38.39%, with 25.56% 26.18% paid directly by the employer.

(b) For public school employees who first worked for a public school reporting unit on or after July 1, 2010 and who are enrolled in the health premium subsidy, the annual level percentage of payroll contribution rate is estimated at 35.60%, 36.60%, with 24.28% 24.39% paid directly by the employer.

(c) For public school employees who first worked for a public school reporting unit on or after July 1, 2010 and who participate in the personal healthcare fund, the annual level percentage of payroll contribution rate is estimated at 35.35%, 36.24%, with 24.03% paid directly by the employer.

(d) For public school employees who first worked for a public school reporting unit on or after September 4, 2012, who elect defined contribution, and who participate in the personal healthcare fund, the annual level percentage of payroll contribution rate is estimated at 32.28%, 33.17%, with 20.96% paid directly by the employer.

(e) For public school employees who first worked for a public school reporting unit before July 1, 2010, who elect defined contribution, and who are enrolled in the health premium subsidy, the annual level percentage of payroll contribution rate is estimated at 32.53%, 33.53%, with 21.21% 21.32% paid directly by the employer.

(f) For public school employees who first worked for a public school reporting unit before July 1, 2010, who elect defined contribution, and who participate in the personal healthcare fund, the annual level percentage of payroll contribution rate is estimated at 32.28%, 33.17%, with 20.96% paid directly by the employer.

(g) For public school employees who first worked for a public school reporting unit before July 1, 2010 and who participate in the personal healthcare fund, the annual level percentage of payroll contribution rate is estimated at 36.63%, 38.03%, with 25.31% 25.82% paid directly by the employer.

(H) FOR PUBLIC SCHOOL EMPLOYEES WHO FIRST WORKED FOR A PUBLIC SCHOOL REPORTING UNIT AFTER JANUARY 31, 2018 AND WHO ELECT TO BECOME MEMBERS OF THE MPSERS PLAN, THE ANNUAL LEVEL PERCENTAGE OF PAYROLL CONTRIBUTION RATE IS ESTIMATED AT 39.37%, WITH 27.16% PAID DIRECTLY BY THE EMPLOYER.

(3) In addition to the employer payments described in subsection (2), the employer shall pay the applicable contributions to the Tier 2 plan, as determined by the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1301 to 38.1437.

(4) The contribution rates in subsection (2) reflect an amortization period of 21 20 years for 2017‑2018. 2018‑2019. The public school employees’ retirement system board shall notify each district and intermediate district by February 28 of each fiscal year of the estimated contribution rate for the next fiscal year.

Sec. 147a. (1) From the appropriation in section 11, there is allocated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 an amount not to exceed $100,000,000.00 for payments to participating districts. A participating district that receives money under this subsection shall use that money solely for the purpose of offsetting a portion of the retirement contributions owed by the district for the fiscal year in which it is received. The amount allocated to each participating district under this subsection shall be based on each participating district’s percentage of the total statewide payroll for all participating districts for the immediately preceding fiscal year. As used in this subsection, “participating district” means a district that is a reporting unit of the Michigan public school employees’ retirement system under the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1301 to 38.1437, and that reports employees to the Michigan public school employees’ retirement system for the applicable fiscal year.

(2) In addition to the allocation under subsection (1), from the state school aid fund money appropriated under section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $48,940,000.00 for 2017‑2018 $88,091,000.00 FOR 2018‑2019 for payments to participating districts and intermediate districts and from the general fund money appropriated under section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $29,000.00 for 2017‑2018 $48,000.00 FOR 2018‑2019 for payments to participating district libraries. The amount allocated to each participating entity under this subsection shall be based on each participating entity’s percentage of the total statewide payroll for that type of participating entity for the immediately preceding fiscal year. A participating entity that receives money under this subsection shall use that money solely for the purpose of offsetting a portion of the normal cost contribution rate. As used in this subsection:

(a) “District library” means a district library established under the district library establishment act, 1989 PA 24, MCL 397.171 to 397.196.

(b) “Participating entity” means a district, intermediate district, or district library that is a reporting unit of the Michigan public school employees’ retirement system under the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1301 to 38.1437, and that reports employees to the Michigan public school employees’ retirement system for the applicable fiscal year.

Sec. 147b. (1) The MPSERS retirement obligation reform reserve fund is created as a separate account within the state school aid fund.

(2) The state treasurer may receive money or other assets from any source for deposit into the MPSERS retirement obligation reform reserve fund. The state treasurer shall direct the investment of the MPSERS retirement obligation reform reserve fund. The state treasurer shall credit to the MPSERS retirement obligation reform reserve fund interest and earnings from the MPSERS retirement obligation reform reserve fund.

(3) Money available in the MPSERS retirement obligation reform reserve fund shall not be expended without a specific appropriation.

(4) Money in the MPSERS retirement obligation reform reserve fund at the close of the fiscal year shall remain in the MPSERS retirement obligation reform reserve fund and shall not lapse to the state school aid fund or to the general fund. The department of treasury shall be the administrator of the MPSERS retirement obligation reform reserve fund for auditing purposes.

(5) If the contributions described in section 43e of the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1343e, as that section was added by 2010 PA 75, are determined by a final order of a court of competent jurisdiction for which all rights of appeal have been exhausted to be constitutional and if the order for preliminary injunction in case no. 10‑45‑MM issued on July 13, 2010 is lifted, the money placed in a separate interest bearing account as a result of implementing the preliminary injunction shall be deposited into the MPSERS retirement obligation reform reserve fund created in this section to be used solely for health care unfunded accrued liabilities.

(6) For the fiscal year ending September 30, 2018, $55,000,000.00 from the state school aid fund shall be deposited into the MPSERS retirement obligation reform reserve fund to be used for the purposes under section 147e.

Sec. 147c. (1) From the appropriation in section 11, there is allocated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 an amount not to exceed $960,130,000.00 $1,032,000,000.00 from the state school aid fund for payments to districts and intermediate districts that are participating entities of the Michigan public school employees’ retirement system. In addition, from the general fund money appropriated in section 11, there is allocated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 an amount not to exceed $654,000.00 $700,000.00 for payments to district libraries that are participating entities of the Michigan public school employees’ retirement system. All of the following apply to funding under this subsection:

(a) For 2017‑2018, 2018‑2019, the amounts allocated under this subsection are estimated to provide an average MPSERS rate cap per pupil amount of $640.00 $690.00 and are estimated to provide a rate cap per pupil for districts ranging between $4.00 and $3,020.00.$3,000.00.

(b) Payments made under this subsection shall be equal to the difference between the unfunded actuarial accrued liability contribution rate as calculated pursuant to section 41 of the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1341, as calculated without taking into account the maximum employer rate of 20.96% included in section 41 of the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1341, and the maximum employer rate of 20.96% included in section 41 of the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1341.

(c) The amount allocated to each participating entity under this subsection shall be based on each participating entity’s proportion of the total covered payroll for the immediately preceding fiscal year for the same type of participating entities. A participating entity that receives funds under this subsection shall use the funds solely for the purpose of retirement contributions as specified in subdivision (d).

(d) Each participating entity receiving funds under this subsection shall forward an amount equal to the amount allocated under subdivision (c) to the retirement system in a form, manner, and time frame determined by the retirement system.

(e) Funds allocated under this subsection should be considered when comparing a district’s growth in total state aid funding from 1 fiscal year to the next.

(f) Not later than December 20, 2017, 2018, the department shall publish and post on its website an estimated MPSERS rate cap per pupil for each district.

(g) It is the intent of the legislature that any funds allocated under this subsection are first applied to pension contributions, and if any funds remain after that payment, those remaining funds shall be applied to other postemployment benefit contributions.

(h) As used in this subsection:

(i) “District library” means a district library established under the district library establishment act, 1989 PA 24, MCL 397.171 to 397.196.

(ii) “MPSERS rate cap per pupil” means an amount equal to the quotient of the district’s payment under this subsection divided by the district’s pupils in membership.

(iii) “Participating entity” means a district, intermediate district, or district library that is a reporting unit of the Michigan public school employees’ retirement system under the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1301 to 38.1437, and that reports employees to the Michigan public school employees’ retirement system for the applicable fiscal year.

(iv) “Retirement board” means the board that administers the retirement system under the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1301 to 38.1437.

(v) “Retirement system” means the Michigan public school employees’ retirement system under the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1301 to 38.1437.

(2) In addition to the funds allocated under subsection (1), from the appropriation in section 11, there is allocated for 2017‑2018 only an amount not to exceed $200,000,000.00 for payments to participating entities. Notwithstanding section 17b, payments to eligible participating entities under this subsection shall be paid in 1 installment no later than October 20, 2017. Payments under this subsection shall be made as follows:

(a) The amount allocated to each participating entity under this subsection shall be based on each participating entity’s proportion of the total covered payroll for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2016. A participating entity that receives funds under this subsection shall use the funds solely for purposes of this subsection.

(b) Each participating entity receiving funds under this subsection shall forward an amount equal to the sum of the amount allocated under this subsection and the amount allocated under subsection (1) to the retirement system in a form, manner, and time frame prescribed by the retirement system.

(c) Payments under this subsection shall be used by the retirement system specifically for the payment or prepayment of the final years or partial years of any additional costs to the retirement system due to the operation of section 81b of the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1381b, without regard to the amortization of those costs under section 81b(5) of the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1381b, and in a manner and form as determined by the office of retirement services.

(d) As used in this subsection:

(i) “Participating entity” means a district, intermediate district, community college, or district library that is a reporting unit of the Michigan public school employees’ retirement system under the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1301 to 38.1437, and that reports employees to the Michigan public school employees’ retirement system for the applicable fiscal year.

(ii) “Retirement system” means the Michigan public school employees’ retirement system under the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1301 to 38.1437.

Sec. 147e. (1) From the appropriation in section 11, there is allocated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 an amount not to exceed $23,100,000.00 $31,900,000.00 from the MPSERS retirement obligation reform reserve fund AND $5,700,000.00 FROM THE STATE SCHOOL AID FUND for payments to participating entities.

(2) The payment to each participating entity under this section shall be the sum of the amounts under this subsection as follows:

(a) An amount equal to the contributions made by a participating entity for the additional contribution made to a qualified participant’s Tier 2 account in an amount equal to the contribution made by the qualified participant not to exceed 3% of the qualified participant’s compensation as provided for under section 131(6) of the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1431. , if that act is amended by either Senate Bill No. 401 or House Bill No. 4647 of the 99th Legislature.

(b) Beginning October 1, 2017, an amount equal to the contributions made by a participating entity for a qualified participant who is only a Tier 2 qualified participant under section 81d of the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1381d, not to exceed 4%, and, beginning February 1, 2018, not to exceed 1%, of the qualified participant’s compensation. , if that act is amended by either Senate Bill No. 401 or House Bill No. 4647 of the 99th Legislature.

(c) An amount equal to the increase in employer normal cost contributions under section 41b(2) of the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1341b, for a member that was hired after February 1, 2018 and chose to participate in Tier 1, compared to the employer normal cost contribution for a member under section 41b(1) of the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1341b. , if section 41b of the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1341b, is amended by either Senate Bill No. 401 or House Bill No. 4647 of the 99th Legislature.

(3) As used in this section:

(a) “Member” means that term as defined under the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1301 to 38.1437.

(b) “Participating entity” means a district, intermediate district, or community college that is a reporting unit of the Michigan public school employees’ retirement system under the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1301 to 38.1437, and that reports employees to the Michigan public school employees’ retirement system for the applicable fiscal year.

(c) “Qualified participant” means that term as defined under section 124 of the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1424.

Sec. 152a. (1) As required by the court in the consolidated cases known as Adair v State of Michigan, Adair v State of Michigan, 486 Mich 468 (2010), from the state school aid fund money appropriated in section 11 there is allocated for 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 an amount not to exceed $38,000,500.00 to be used solely for the purpose of paying necessary costs related to the state‑mandated collection, maintenance, and reporting of data to this state.

(2) From the allocation in subsection (1), the department shall make payments to districts and intermediate districts in an equal amount per‑pupil based on the total number of pupils in membership in each district and intermediate district. The department shall not make any adjustment to these payments after the final installment payment under section 17b is made.

Sec. 152b. (1) From the general fund money appropriated under section 11, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $2,500,000.00 for each fiscal year for 2016‑2017 and for 2017‑2018 AND AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $250,000.00 FOR 2018‑2019 to reimburse actual costs incurred by nonpublic schools in complying with a health, safety, or welfare requirement mandated by a law or administrative rule of this state.

(2) By January 1 of each applicable fiscal year, the department shall publish a form for reporting actual costs incurred by a nonpublic school in complying with a health, safety, or welfare requirement mandated under state law containing each health, safety, or welfare requirement mandated by a law or administrative rule of this state applicable to a nonpublic school and with a reference to each relevant provision of law or administrative rule for the requirement. The form shall be posted on the department’s website in electronic form.

(3) By June 30 of each applicable fiscal year, a nonpublic school seeking reimbursement for actual costs incurred in complying with a health, safety, or welfare requirement under a law or administrative rule of this state during each applicable school year shall submit a completed form described in subsection (2) to the department. This section does not require a nonpublic school to submit a form described in subsection (2). A nonpublic school is not eligible for reimbursement under this section if the nonpublic school does not submit the form described in subsection (2) in a timely manner.

(4) By August 15 of each applicable fiscal year, the department shall distribute funds to each nonpublic school that submits a completed form described under subsection (2) in a timely manner. The superintendent shall determine the amount of funds to be paid to each nonpublic school in an amount that does not exceed the nonpublic school’s actual costs in complying with a health, safety, or welfare requirement under a law or administrative rule of this state. The superintendent shall calculate a nonpublic school’s actual cost in accordance with this section.

(5) If the funds allocated under this section are insufficient to fully fund payments as otherwise calculated under this section, the department shall distribute funds under this section on a prorated or other equitable basis as determined by the superintendent.

(6) The department may review the records of a nonpublic school submitting a form described in subsection (2) only for the limited purpose of verifying the nonpublic school’s compliance with this section. If a nonpublic school does not allow the department to review records under this subsection, the nonpublic school is not eligible for reimbursement under this section.

(7) The funds appropriated under this section are for purposes related to education, are considered to be incidental to the operation of a nonpublic school, are noninstructional in character, and are intended for the public purpose of ensuring the health, safety, and welfare of the children in nonpublic schools and to reimburse nonpublic schools for costs described in this section.

(8) Funds allocated under this section are not intended to aid or maintain any nonpublic school, support the attendance of any student at a nonpublic school, employ any person at a nonpublic school, support the attendance of any student at any location where instruction is offered to a nonpublic school student, or support the employment of any person at any location where instruction is offered to a nonpublic school student.

(9) For purposes of this section, “actual cost” means the hourly wage for the employee or employees performing a task or tasks required to comply with a health, safety, or welfare requirement under a law or administrative rule of this state identified by the department under subsection (2) and is to be calculated in accordance with the form published by the department under subsection (2), which shall include a detailed itemization of costs. The nonpublic school shall not charge more than the hourly wage of its lowest‑paid employee capable of performing a specific task regardless of whether that individual is available and regardless of who actually performs a specific task. Labor costs under this subsection shall be estimated and charged in increments of 15 minutes or more, with all partial time increments rounded down. When calculating costs under subsection (4), fee components shall be itemized in a manner that expresses both the hourly wage and the number of hours charged. The nonpublic school may not charge any applicable labor charge amount to cover or partially cover the cost of health or fringe benefits. A nonpublic school shall not charge any overtime wages in the calculation of labor costs.

(10) For the purposes of this section, the actual cost incurred by a nonpublic school for taking daily student attendance shall be considered an actual cost in complying with a health, safety, or welfare requirement under a law or administrative rule of this state. Training fees, inspection fees, and criminal background check fees are considered actual costs in complying with a health, safety, or welfare requirement under a law or administrative rule of this state.

(11) The funds allocated under this section for 2016‑2017 2017‑2018 are a work project appropriation, and any unexpended funds for 2016‑2017 2017‑2018 are carried forward into 2017‑2018. 2018‑2019. The purpose of the work project is to continue to reimburse nonpublic schools for actual costs incurred in complying with a health, safety, or welfare requirement mandated by a law or administrative rule of this state. The estimated completion date of the work project is September 30, 2019.2020.

(12) THE FUNDS ALLOCATED UNDER THIS SECTION FOR 2018‑2019 ARE A WORK PROJECT APPROPRIATION, AND ANY UNEXPENDED FUNDS FOR 2018‑2019 ARE CARRIED FORWARD INTO 2019‑2020. THE PURPOSE OF THE WORK PROJECT IS TO CONTINUE TO REIMBURSE NONPUBLIC SCHOOLS FOR ACTUAL COSTS INCURRED IN COMPLYING WITH A HEALTH, SAFETY, OR WELFARE REQUIREMENT MANDATED BY A LAW OR ADMINISTRATIVE RULE OF THIS STATE. THE ESTIMATED COMPLETION DATE OF THE WORK PROJECT IS SEPTEMBER 30, 2020.

Sec. 163. (1) Except as provided in the revised school code, the board of a district or intermediate district shall not permit any of the following:

(a) A noncertificated educator AN INDIVIDUAL WHO DOES NOT HOLD A VALID CERTIFICATE OR WHO IS NOT WORKING UNDER A VALID SUBSTITUTE PERMIT, AUTHORIZATION, OR APPROVAL ISSUED UNDER RULES PROMULGATED BY THE DEPARTMENT to teach in an elementary or secondary school. or in an adult basic education or high school completion program.

(b) A noncertificated educator AN INDIVIDUAL WHO DOES NOT SATISFY THE REQUIREMENTS OF SECTION 1233 OF THE REVISED SCHOOL CODE, MCL 380.1233, AND RULES PROMULGATED BY THE DEPARTMENT to provide counseling SCHOOL COUNSELOR services to pupils in an elementary or secondary school. or in an adult basic education or high school completion program.

(c) A noncertificated educator to administer AN INDIVIDUAL WHO DOES NOT SATISFY THE REQUIREMENTS OF SECTION 1246 OF THE REVISED SCHOOL CODE, MCL 380.1246, OR WHO IS NOT WORKING UNDER A VALID SUBSTITUTE PERMIT ISSUED UNDER RULES PROMULGATED BY THE DEPARTMENT, TO BE EMPLOYED AS A SUPERINTENDENT, PRINCIPAL, OR ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL, OR AS AN INDIVIDUAL WHOSE PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITY IS TO ADMINISTER instructional programs in an elementary or secondary school, or in an adult basic education or high school completion program, unless that educator is fulfilling applicable continuing education requirements.A DISTRICT OR INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT.

(2) Except as provided in the revised school code, a district or intermediate district employing educators not legally certificated or licensed INDIVIDUALS IN VIOLATION OF THIS SECTION shall have deducted the sum equal to the amount paid the educators INDIVIDUALS for the period of noncertificated, unlicensed, or illegal employment. Each intermediate superintendent shall notify the department of the name of the noncertificated or unlicensed educator, INDIVIDUAL EMPLOYED IN VIOLATION OF THIS SECTION, and the district employing that individual and the amount of salary the noncertificated or unlicensed educator INDIVIDUAL was paid within a constituent district.

(3) If a school official is notified by the department that he or she is employing a nonapproved, noncertificated, or unlicensed educator AN INDIVIDUAL in violation of this section and knowingly continues to employ that educator, INDIVIDUAL, the school official is guilty of a misdemeanor , punishable by a fine of $1,500.00 for each incidence. This penalty is in addition to all other financial penalties otherwise specified in this article.

Sec. 164h. (1) Beginning October 1, 2017, a district or intermediate district shall not enter into a collective bargaining agreement that does any of the following:

(a) Establishes racial or religious preferences for employees.

(b) Automatically deducts union dues from employee compensation.

(c) Is in conflict with any state or federal law regarding district or intermediate district transparency.

(d) Includes a method of compensation that does not comply with section 1250 of the revised school code, MCL 380.1250. THIS SUBDIVISION SHALL NOT BE CONSTRUED TO AFFECT THE OPERATION OF SECTION 15(3)(O) OF 1947 PA 336, MCL 423.215, THE OPERATION OF SECTION 1231 OF THE REVISED SCHOOL CODE, MCL 380.1231, OR THE REQUIREMENT TO CONFER IN GOOD FAITH WITH RESPECT TO WAGES UNDER SECTION 15(1) OF 1947 PA 336, MCL 423.215.

(2) A district or intermediate district that enters into a collective bargaining agreement in violation of subsection (1) shall forfeit an amount equal to 5% of the funds due to the district or intermediate district under this article.

Sec. 166b. (1) This act does not prohibit a parent or legal guardian of a minor who is enrolled in any of grades kindergarten to 12 in a nonpublic school or who is being home‑schooled from also enrolling the minor in a district, public school academy, or intermediate district in any curricular offering that is provided by the district, public school academy, or intermediate district at a public school site and is available to pupils in the minor’s grade level or age group, subject to compliance with the same requirements that apply to a full‑time pupil’s participation in the offering. However, state school aid shall be provided under this act for a minor enrolled as described in this subsection only for A curricular offerings that are OFFERING THAT IS RESTRICTED TO NONESSENTIAL ELECTIVE COURSES AND IS available to full‑time pupils in the minor’s grade level or age group. FOR THE PURPOSES OF THIS SUBSECTION, A CURRICULAR OFFERING INCLUDES OPTIONAL EXPERIENCES ASSOCIATED WITH THE CURRICULAR OFFERING.

(2) This act does not prohibit a parent or legal guardian of a minor who is enrolled in any of grades kindergarten to 12 in a nonpublic school or who resides within the A district and is being home‑schooled from also enrolling the minor in the district in a ANY NONESSENTIAL ELECTIVE curricular offering being provided by the district at the A nonpublic school site . However, state OR THAT IS PROVIDED BY THE DISTRICT, A PUBLIC SCHOOL ACADEMY, OR AN INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT AT A PUBLIC SCHOOL SITE, AND THAT IS AVAILABLE TO PUPILS IN THE MINOR’S GRADE LEVEL OR AGE GROUP, SUBJECT TO COMPLIANCE WITH THE SAME REQUIREMENTS THAT APPLY TO A FULL‑TIME PUPIL’S PARTICIPATION IN THE OFFERING. FOR THE PURPOSES OF THIS SUBSECTION, A CURRICULAR OFFERING INCLUDES OPTIONAL EXPERIENCES ASSOCIATED WITH THE CURRICULAR OFFERING. STATE school aid shall be provided under this act for a minor enrolled as described in this subsection only if all of the following apply:

(a) Either of the following:

(i) The nonpublic school site is located, or the nonpublic students are educated, within the geographic boundaries of the district.

(ii) If the nonpublic school has submitted a written request to the district in which the nonpublic school is located for the district to provide certain instruction under this subsection for a school year and the district does not agree to provide some or all of that instruction by May 1 immediately preceding that school year or, if the request is submitted after March 1 immediately preceding that school year, within 60 days after the nonpublic school submits the request, the instruction is instead provided by an eligible other district. This subparagraph does not require a nonpublic school to submit more than 1 request to the district in which the nonpublic school is located for that district to provide instruction under this subsection, and does not require a nonpublic school to submit an additional request to the district in which the nonpublic school is located for that district to provide additional instruction under this subsection beyond the instruction requested in the original request, before having the instruction provided by an eligible other district. A public school academy that is located in the district in which the nonpublic school is located or in an eligible other district also may provide instruction under this subparagraph under the same conditions as an eligible other district. As used in this subparagraph, “eligible other district” means a district that is located in the same intermediate district as the district in which the nonpublic school is located or is located in an intermediate district that is contiguous to that intermediate district.

(b) The nonpublic school is registered with the department as a nonpublic school and meets all state reporting requirements for nonpublic schools.

(c) The instruction is provided directly by a certified teacher at OF the district, or public school academy, or at an intermediate district.

(d) The curricular offering is also available to full‑time pupils in the minor’s grade level or age group in the district or public school academy at a public school site.

(e) The curricular offering is restricted to nonessential elective courses for pupils in grades kindergarten to 12.

(F) THE DISTRICT ENSURES THAT ALL INDIVIDUALS THAT HAVE CONTACT WITH PUPILS AS PART OF A COURSE PROVIDED TO PUPILS ENROLLED IN THE DISTRICT UNDER SECTION 166B AND COUNTED IN MEMBERSHIP UNDER SECTION 6 HAVE NOT BEEN CONVICTED OF SEXUAL MISCONDUCT.

(G) THE DISTRICT ENSURES THAT AN INDIVIDUAL WHO PROVIDES DIRECT OR INDIRECT CURRICULAR OFFERINGS TO PUPILS AS PART OF AN OPTIONAL OR REQUIRED COURSE PROVIDED TO PUPILS ENROLLED IN THE DISTRICT UNDER SECTION 166B AND COUNTED IN MEMBERSHIP UNDER SECTION 6, OR WHO HAS UNSUPERVISED CONTACT WITH PUPILS AS PART OF SUCH A COURSE, IS SUBJECT TO THE REQUIREMENTS UNDER SECTIONS 1230, 1230A, 1230B, 1230C, 1230D, 1230E, AND 1230G OF THE REVISED SCHOOL CODE, MCL 380.1230, 380.1230A, 380.1230B, 380.1230C, 380.1230D, 380.1230E, AND 380.1230G, AS IF THE INDIVIDUAL IS OFFERED FULL‑TIME OR PART‑TIME EMPLOYMENT IN THE DISTRICT, IS AN EMPLOYEE OF THE DISTRICT, OR IS ASSIGNED TO REGULARLY AND CONTINUOUSLY WORK UNDER CONTRACT IN ANY OF ITS SCHOOLS, AS APPLICABLE.

(H) THE DISTRICT ENSURES THAT EACH OPTIONAL EXPERIENCE ASSOCIATED WITH A COURSE PROVIDED TO PUPILS ENROLLED IN THE DISTRICT UNDER SECTION 166B AND COUNTED IN MEMBERSHIP UNDER SECTION 6 IS OFFERED ON A SCHEDULE THAT ENSURES THAT THE EXPERIENCE IS AVAILABLE TO THE MAJORITY OF FULL‑TIME PUPILS IN MEMBERSHIP IN THE DISTRICT IN THE SAME GRADE LEVEL OR AGE GROUP AS PUPILS PARTICIPATING IN THE COURSE AND ENROLLED IN THE DISTRICT UNDER SECTION 166B.

(I) THE DISTRICT PROVIDES THE DEPARTMENT INFORMATION NECESSARY TO QUANTIFY ALL OF THE FOLLOWING, IN A FORM AND MANNER PRESCRIBED BY THE DEPARTMENT IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE CENTER:

(i) A COMPLETE LISTING OF ALL COURSES PROVIDED TO PUPILS COUNTED IN MEMBERSHIP IN THE DISTRICT.

(ii) COURSE ENROLLMENTS BY EACH PARTICIPANT USING LOCAL CODING AND THE SCHOOL CODES FOR THE EXCHANGE OF DATA (SCED).

(iii) IDENTIFICATION OF EACH COURSE TEACHER OR MENTOR.

(3) A nonessential course in grades 1 to 8 is a course other than a mathematics, science, social studies, and English language arts course required by the district for grade progression. Nonessential courses in grades 9 to 12 are those other than algebra 1, algebra 2, English 9‑12, geometry, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, geography, American history, world history, the Constitution, government, and civics, or courses that fulfill the same credit requirement as these courses. Nonessential elective courses include courses offered by the local district for high school credit that are also capable of generating postsecondary credit, including, at least, advanced placement and international baccalaureate courses. College level courses taken by high school students for college credit are nonessential courses. Remedial courses for any grade in the above‑listed essential courses are considered essential. Kindergarten is considered nonessential.

(4) Subject to section 6(4)(ii), a minor enrolled as described in this section is a part‑time pupil for purposes of state school aid under this act.

(5) A district that receives a written request to provide instruction under subsection (2) shall reply to the request in writing by May 1 immediately preceding the applicable school year or, if the request is made after March 1 immediately preceding that school year, within 60 days after the nonpublic school submits the request. The written reply shall specify whether the district agrees to provide or does not agree to provide the instruction for each portion of instruction included in the request.

SEC. 167B. (1) NOT LATER THAN AUGUST 1, 2018, AND NOT LATER THAN AUGUST 1 OF EACH SUBSEQUENT YEAR, A DISTRICT OR INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT THAT OPERATES A SCHOOL VIOLENCE TIP LINE SHALL REPORT TO THE ATTORNEY GENERAL ON THE OPERATION OF THE TIP LINE. THE INFORMATION REPORTED MUST INCLUDE AT LEAST ALL OF THE FOLLOWING, FOR THE PURPOSES OF STUDYING BEST PRACTICES:

(A) WHETHER THE TIP LINE OPERATES 24 HOURS A DAY.

(B) WHETHER THE TIP LINE IS CONNECTED TO LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT.

(C) THE TYPE AND DURATION OF TRAINING FOR PERSONNEL WHO OPERATE THE TIP LINE.

(2) A DISTRICT OR INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT SHALL ANNUALLY DESIGNATE AT LEAST 1, BUT NO MORE THAN 2, EMPLOYEES AS THE SCHOOL OFFICIALS WHO WILL RECEIVE INFORMATION UNDER SECTION 3(4) OF THE STUDENT SAFETY ACT, 2013 PA 183, MCL 752.913, AND SHALL PROVIDE THE ATTORNEY GENERAL WITH THE CONTACT INFORMATION FOR THE DESIGNATED SCHOOL OFFICIALS THAT ALLOWS THE DESIGNATED SCHOOL OFFICIALS TO RECEIVE INFORMATION 24 HOURS A DAY, 365 DAYS A YEAR.

Sec. 169a. (1) A board member, official, or employee of a district or intermediate district shall not interfere with the right or ability of PROVIDE ANY INFORMATION RECEIVED FROM the Michigan schools for the deaf and blind to provide information about the ITS residential program among TO parents and guardians of pupils or WHO ARE DEAF, DEAF‑BLIND, OR HARD OF HEARING AND TO ANY residents of the district or intermediate district WHO REQUEST THE INFORMATION.

(2) Upon determining that a pupil is deaf or hard of hearing, a district or intermediate district shall provide to the pupil’s parent or legal guardian information, provided by the Michigan coalition for deaf and hard of hearing persons, on educational placement options for deaf and hard of hearing children.

(3) Upon determining that a pupil is blind, a district or intermediate district shall provide to the pupil’s parent or legal guardian information, provided by the Michigan federation for the blind, on educational placement options for blind children.

(4) A DISTRICT OR INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT THAT VIOLATES THIS SECTION SHALL FORFEIT AN AMOUNT EQUAL TO 5% OF THE FUNDS DUE TO THE DISTRICT OR INTERMEDIATE DISTRICT UNDER THIS ARTICLE.

Sec. 201. (1) Subject to the conditions set forth in this article, the amounts listed in this section are appropriated for community colleges for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2018, 2019, from the funds indicated in this section. The following is a summary of the appropriations in this section:

(a) The gross appropriation is $399,326,500.00. $408,215,500.00. After deducting total interdepartmental grants and intradepartmental transfers in the amount of $0.00, the adjusted gross appropriation is $399,326,500.00.$408,215,500.00.

(b) The sources of the adjusted gross appropriation described in subdivision (a) are as follows:

(i) Total federal revenues, $0.00.

(ii) Total local revenues, $0.00.

(iii) Total private revenues, $0.00.

(iv) Total other state restricted revenues, $398,301,500.00.$408,215,500.00.

(v) State general fund/general purpose money, $1,025,000.00.$0.00.

(2) Subject to subsection (3), the amount appropriated for community college operations is $319,050,900.00, $322,250,900.00, allocated as follows:

(a) The appropriation for Alpena Community College is $5,627,500.00, $5,596,200.00 for operations and $31,300.00 for performance funding.$5,707,600.00, $5,665,900.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $41,700.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(b) The appropriation for Bay de Noc Community College is $5,589,000.00, $5,560,900.00 for operations and $28,100.00 for performance funding.$5,624,800.00, $5,589,000.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $35,800.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(c) The appropriation for Delta College is $14,990,700.00, $14,907,700.00 for operations and $83,000.00 for performance funding.$15,104,300.00, $14,990,700.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $113,600.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(d) The appropriation for Glen Oaks Community College is $2,601,400.00, $2,586,900.00 for operations and $14,500.00 for performance funding.$2,620,000.00, $2,601,400.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $18,600.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(e) The appropriation for Gogebic Community College is $4,715,400.00, $4,692,200.00 for operations and $23,200.00 for performance funding.$4,844,300.00, $4,809,700.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $34,600.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(f) The appropriation for Grand Rapids Community College is $18,556,800.00, $18,450,500.00 for operations and $106,300.00 for performance funding.$18,709,300.00, $18,556,800.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $152,500.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(g) The appropriation for Henry Ford College is $22,299,200.00, $22,176,000.00 for operations and $123,200.00 for performance funding.$22,463,600.00, $22,299,200.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $164,400.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(h) The appropriation for Jackson College is $12,590,100.00, $12,527,400.00 for operations and $62,700.00 for performance funding.$12,698,200.00, $12,617,200.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $81,000.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(i) The appropriation for Kalamazoo Valley Community College is $12,948,700.00, $12,873,900.00 for operations and $74,800.00 for performance funding.$13,046,600.00, $12,948,700.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $97,900.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(j) The appropriation for Kellogg Community College is $10,143,600.00, $10,087,500.00 for operations and $56,100.00 for performance funding.$10,214,400.00, $10,143,600.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $70,800.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(k) The appropriation for Kirtland Community College is $3,289,400.00, $3,270,000.00 for operations and $19,400.00 for performance funding.$3,321,600.00, $3,289,400.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $32,200.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(l) The appropriation for Lake Michigan College is $5,523,600.00, $5,492,800.00 for operations and $30,800.00 for performance funding.$5,672,100.00, $5,631,000.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $41,100.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(m) The appropriation for Lansing Community College is $32,324,200.00, $32,165,600.00 for operations and $158,600.00 for performance funding.$32,725,800.00, $32,515,500.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $210,300.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(n) The appropriation for Macomb Community College is $33,863,600.00, $33,681,800.00 for operations and $181,800.00 for performance funding.$34,124,000.00, $33,863,600.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $260,400.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(o) The appropriation for Mid Michigan Community College is $4,968,900.00, $4,937,400.00 for operations and $31,500.00 for performance funding.$5,112,400.00, $5,068,300.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $44,100.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(p) The appropriation for Monroe County Community College is $4,665,500.00, $4,636,700.00 for operations and $28,800.00 for performance funding.$4,708,600.00, $4,665,500.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $43,100.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(q) The appropriation for Montcalm Community College is $3,446,300.00, $3,426,700.00 for operations and $19,600.00 for performance funding.$3,542,900.00, $3,515,200.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $27,700.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(r) The appropriation for C.S. Mott Community College is $16,258,100.00, $16,167,200.00 for operations and $90,900.00 for performance funding.$16,381,600.00, $16,258,100.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $123,500.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(s) The appropriation for Muskegon Community College is $9,203,000.00, $9,150,600.00 for operations and $52,400.00 for performance funding.$9,264,700.00, $9,203,000.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $61,700.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(t) The appropriation for North Central Michigan College is $3,353,200.00, $3,330,200.00 for operations and $23,000.00 for performance funding.$3,402,600.00, $3,368,400.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $34,200.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(u) The appropriation for Northwestern Michigan College is $9,508,900.00, $9,459,800.00 for operations and $49,100.00 for performance funding.$9,625,400.00, $9,559,700.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $65,700.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(v) The appropriation for Oakland Community College is $21,905,700.00, $21,770,900.00 for operations and $134,800.00 for performance funding.$22,093,000.00, $21,905,700.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $187,300.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(w) The appropriation for Schoolcraft College is $12,991,300.00, $12,909,300.00 for operations and $82,000.00 for performance funding.$13,112,900.00, $12,991,300.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $121,600.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(x) The appropriation for Southwestern Michigan College is $6,860,700.00, $6,827,000.00 for operations and $33,700.00 for performance funding.$6,946,900.00, $6,903,300.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $43,600.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(y) The appropriation for St. Clair County Community College is $7,300,100.00, $7,259,300.00 for operations and $40,800.00 for performance funding.$7,358,700.00, $7,300,100.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $58,600.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(z) The appropriation for Washtenaw Community College is $13,631,400.00, $13,534,000.00 for operations and $97,400.00 for performance funding.$13,764,000.00, $13,631,400.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $132,600.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(aa) The appropriation for Wayne County Community College is $17,338,300.00, $17,234,200.00 for operations and $104,100.00 for performance funding.$17,487,200.00, $17,338,300.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $148,900.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(bb) The appropriation for West Shore Community College is $2,556,300.00, $2,540,000.00 for operations and $16,300.00 for performance funding.$2,573,400.00, $2,556,300.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $17,100.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(3) The amount appropriated in subsection (2) for community college operations is $319,050,900.00 $322,250,900.00 and is appropriated from the state school aid fund.

(4) From the appropriations described in subsection (1), both of the following apply:

(a) Subject to section 207a, the amount appropriated for fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 to offset certain fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 retirement contributions is $1,733,600.00, appropriated from the state school aid fund.

(b) For fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 only, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $3,612,000.00 $6,431,000.00 for payments to participating community colleges, appropriated from the state school aid fund. A community college that receives money under this subdivision shall use that money solely for the purpose of offsetting the normal cost contribution rate.

(5) From the appropriations described in subsection (1), subject to section 207b, the amount appropriated for payments to community colleges that are participating entities of the retirement system is $70,805,000.00, $75,300,000.00, appropriated from the state school aid fund.

(6) From the appropriations described in subsection (1), subject to section 207c, the amount appropriated for renaissance zone tax reimbursements is $3,100,000.00, $2,500,000.00, appropriated from the state school aid fund.

(7) From the appropriations described in subsection (1), there is appropriated $1,025,000.00 from general fund/general purpose money, for fiscal year 20172018 only, to the Michigan Community College Association, for the purpose of enhancing the Michigan Transfer Network website to improve the transfer of college credit among Michigan’s postsecondary institutions. The Michigan Community College Association shall provide information on request to the house and senate subcommittees on community colleges, the house and senate fiscal agencies, and the state budget director on the use of these funds until the project is completed.

Sec. 201a. It is the intent of the legislature to provide appropriations for the fiscal year ending on September 30, 2019 2020 for the items listed in section 201. The fiscal year 2018‑2019 2019‑2020 appropriations are anticipated to be the same as those for fiscal year 2017‑2018, 2018‑2019, except that the amounts will be adjusted for changes in retirement costs, caseload and related costs, federal fund match rates, economic factors, and available revenue. These adjustments will be determined after the January 2018 2019 consensus revenue estimating conference.

Sec. 206. (1) The funds appropriated in section 201 are appropriated for community colleges with fiscal years ending June 30, 2018 2019 and shall be paid out of the state treasury and distributed by the state treasurer to the respective community colleges in 11 monthly installments on the sixteenth of each month, or the next succeeding business day, beginning with October 16, 2017. 2018. Each community college shall accrue its July and August 2018 2019 payments to its institutional fiscal year ending June 30, 2018.2019.

(2) If the state budget director determines that a community college failed to submit any of the information described in subdivisions (a) to (f) in the form and manner specified by the center, the state treasurer shall, subject to subdivision (g), withhold the monthly installments from that community college until those data are submitted:

(a) All verified THE Michigan community colleges activities classification structure VERIFIED DATA INVENTORY data for the preceding academic year to the center by November 1 of each year as specified in section 217.

(b) The college credit opportunity data set as specified in section 209.

(c) The longitudinal data set for the preceding academic year to the center as specified in section 219.

(d) The annual independent audit as specified in section 222.

(e) Tuition and mandatory fees information for the current academic year as specified in section 225.

(f) The number and type of associate degrees and other certificates awarded during the previous academic year as specified in section 226.

(g) The state budget director shall notify the chairs of the house and senate appropriations subcommittees on community colleges at least 10 days before withholding funds from any community college.

Sec. 207a. All of the following apply to the allocation of the fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 appropriations described in section 201(4):

(a) A community college that receives money under section 201(4) shall use that money solely for the purpose of offsetting a portion of the retirement contributions owed by the college for that fiscal year.

(b) The amount allocated to each participating community college under section 201(4) shall be based on each college’s percentage of the total covered payroll for all community colleges that are participating colleges in the immediately preceding fiscal year.

Sec. 207b. All of the following apply to the allocation of the fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 appropriations described in section 201(5) for payments to community colleges that are participating entities of the retirement system:

(a) The amount of a payment under section 201(5) shall be the difference between the unfunded actuarial accrued liability contribution rate as calculated under section 41 of the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1341, as calculated without taking into account the maximum employer rate of 20.96% included in section 41 of the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1341, and the maximum employer rate of 20.96% under section 41 of the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1341.

(b) The amount allocated to each community college under section 201(5) shall be based on each community college’s percentage of the total covered payroll for all community colleges that are participating colleges in the immediately preceding fiscal year. A community college that receives funds under this subdivision shall use the funds solely for the purpose of retirement contributions under section 201(5).

(c) Each participating college that receives funds under section 201(5) shall forward an amount equal to the amount allocated under subdivision (b) to the retirement system in a form and manner determined by the retirement system.

Sec. 207c. All of the following apply to the allocation of the appropriations described in section 201(6) to community colleges described in section 12(3) of the Michigan renaissance zone act, 1996 PA 376, MCL 125.2692:

(a) The amount allocated to each community college under section 201(6) for fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 shall be based on that community college’s proportion of total revenue lost by community colleges as a result of the exemption of property taxes levied in 2017 2018 under the Michigan renaissance zone act, 1996 PA 376, MCL 125.2681 to 125.2696.

(b) The appropriations described in section 201(6) shall be made to each eligible community college within 60 days after the department of treasury certifies to the state budget director that it has received all necessary information to properly determine the amounts payable to each eligible community college under section 12 of the Michigan renaissance zone act, 1996 PA 376, MCL 125.2692.

Sec. 209. (1) Within 30 days after the board of a community college adopts its annual operating budget for the following fiscal year, or after the board adopts a subsequent revision to that budget, the community college shall make all of the following available through a link on its website homepage:

(a) The annual operating budget and subsequent budget revisions.

(b) A link to the most recent “Activities Classification Structure Data Book and Companion”.”MICHIGAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE DATA INVENTORY REPORT”.

(c) General fund revenue and expenditure projections for the current fiscal year and the next fiscal year.

(d) A listing of all debt service obligations, detailed by project, anticipated fiscal year payment of each project, and total outstanding debt for the current fiscal year.

(e) Links to all of the following for the community college:

(i) The current collective bargaining agreement for each bargaining unit.

(ii) Each health care benefits plan, including, but not limited to, medical, dental, vision, disability, long‑term care, or any other type of benefits that would constitute health care services, offered to any bargaining unit or employee of the community college.

(iii) Audits and financial reports for the most recent fiscal year for which they are available.

(iv) A copy of the board of trustees resolution regarding compliance with best practices for the local strategic value component described in section 230(2).

(2) For statewide consistency and public visibility, community colleges must use the icon badge provided by the department of technology, management, and budget consistent with the icon badge developed by the department of education for K‑12 school districts. It must appear on the front of each community college’s homepage. The size of the icon may be reduced to 150 x 150 pixels.

(3) The state budget director shall determine whether a community college has complied with this section. The state budget director may withhold a community college’s monthly installments described in section 206 until the community college complies with this section. The state budget director shall notify the chairs of the house and senate appropriations subcommittee on community colleges at least 10 days before withholding funds from any community college.

(4) Each community college shall report the following information to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on community colleges, the senate and house fiscal agencies, and the state budget office by November 15 of each fiscal year and post that information on its website as required under subsection (1):

(a) Budgeted current fiscal year general fund revenue from tuition and fees.

(b) Budgeted current fiscal year general fund revenue from state appropriations.

(c) Budgeted current fiscal year general fund revenue from property taxes.

(d) Budgeted current fiscal year total general fund revenue.

(e) Budgeted current fiscal year total general fund expenditures.

(5) By November 15 of each year, a community college shall report the following information to the center and post the information on its website under the budget transparency icon badge:

(a) Opportunities for earning college credit through the following programs:

(i) State approved career and technical education or a tech prep articulated program of study.

(ii) Direct college credit or concurrent enrollment.

(iii) Dual enrollment.

(iv) An early college/middle college program.

(b) For each program described in subdivision (a) that the community college offers, all of the following information:

(i) The number of high school students participating in the program.

(ii) The number of school districts that participate in the program with the community college.

(iii) Whether a college professor, qualified local school district employee, or other individual teaches the course or courses in the program.

(iv) The total cost to the community college to operate the program.

(v) The cost per credit hour for the course or courses in the program.

(vi) The location where the course or courses in the program are held.

(vii) Instructional resources offered to the program instructors.

(viii) Resources offered to the student in the program.

(ix) Transportation services provided to students in the program.

SEC. 209A. (1) A PUBLIC COMMUNITY COLLEGE SHALL DEVELOP, MAINTAIN, AND UPDATE A “CAMPUS SAFETY INFORMATION AND RESOURCES” LINK, PROMINENTLY DISPLAYED ON THE HOMEPAGE OF ITS WEBSITE, TO A SECTION OF ITS WEBSITE CONTAINING ALL OF THE INFORMATION REQUIRED UNDER SUBSECTION (2).

(2) THE “CAMPUS SAFETY INFORMATION AND RESOURCES” SECTION OF A PUBLIC COMMUNITY COLLEGE’S WEBSITE SHALL INCLUDE, BUT NOT BE LIMITED TO, ALL OF THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION:

(A) EMERGENCY CONTACT NUMBERS FOR POLICE, FIRE, HEALTH, AND OTHER SERVICES.

(B) HOURS, LOCATIONS, PHONE NUMBERS, AND ELECTRONIC MAIL CONTACTS FOR CAMPUS PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICES AND TITLE IX OFFICES.

(C) A LIST OF SAFETY AND SECURITY SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, INCLUDING TRANSPORTATION, ESCORT SERVICES, BUILDING SURVEILLANCE, ANONYMOUS TIP LINES, AND OTHER AVAILABLE SECURITY SERVICES.

(D) A PUBLIC COMMUNITY COLLEGE’S POLICIES APPLICABLE TO MINORS ON COMMUNITY COLLEGE PROPERTY.

(E) A DIRECTORY OF RESOURCES AVAILABLE AT THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE OR SURROUNDING COMMUNITY FOR STUDENTS OR EMPLOYEES WHO ARE SURVIVORS OF SEXUAL ASSAULT OR SEXUAL ABUSE.

(F) AN ELECTRONIC COPY OF “A RESOURCE HANDBOOK FOR CAMPUS SEXUAL ASSAULT SURVIVORS, FRIENDS AND FAMILY,” PUBLISHED IN 2018 BY THE OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE FIRST LADY OF MICHIGAN.

(G) CAMPUS SECURITY POLICIES AND CRIME STATISTICS PURSUANT TO THE STUDENT RIGHT‑TO‑KNOW AND CAMPUS SECURITY ACT, PUBLIC LAW 101‑542, 104 STAT 2381. INFORMATION SHALL INCLUDE ALL MATERIAL PREPARED PURSUANT TO THE PUBLIC INFORMATION REPORTING REQUIREMENTS UNDER THE CRIME AWARENESS AND CAMPUS SECURITY ACT OF 1990, TITLE II OF THE STUDENT RIGHT‑TO‑KNOW AND CAMPUS SECURITY ACT, PUBLIC LAW 101‑542, 104 STAT 2381.

(3) A COMMUNITY COLLEGE SHALL CERTIFY TO THE STATE BUDGET DIRECTOR BY AUGUST 31, 2018 THAT IT IS IN COMPLIANCE WITH THIS SECTION. THE STATE BUDGET DIRECTOR MAY WITHHOLD A PUBLIC COMMUNITY COLLEGE’S MONTHLY INSTALLMENTS DESCRIBED IN SECTION 206 UNTIL THE PUBLIC COMMUNITY COLLEGE COMPLIES WITH THIS SECTION.

Sec. 210b. By March 1, 2018, 2019, the Michigan Community College Association and the Michigan Association of State Universities shall submit a report to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on community colleges, the senate and house fiscal agencies, and the state budget director on the activities and programs of the transfer steering committee since the March 1, 2017 2018 report required under this section, including all of the following:

(a) The alignment of learning outcomes in gateway mathematics courses in the quantitative reasoning, college algebra, and statistics pathways and the transferability of mathematics gateway courses between and among community colleges and universities.

(b) The development of program‑specific, statewide transfer pathways that meet program requirements for both associate and bachelor’s degree programs.

(c) The development of an enhanced online communication tool to share information about postsecondary options in Michigan, course equivalencies, and transfer pathways that are clearly articulated.

(d) The establishment of clear timelines for developing and implementing transfer pathways.

(e) A progress report on the implementation of the Michigan transfer agreement.

SEC. 210F. BY FEBRUARY 1, 2019, THE MICHIGAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE ASSOCIATION, THE MICHIGAN ASSOCIATION OF STATE UNIVERSITIES, AND THE MICHIGAN INDEPENDENT COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES, ON BEHALF OF THEIR MEMBER COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES, SHALL SUBMIT TO THE SENATE AND HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS SUBCOMMITTEES ON HIGHER EDUCATION, THE SENATE AND HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS SUBCOMMITTEES ON COMMUNITY COLLEGES, THE SENATE AND HOUSE FISCAL AGENCIES, AND THE STATE BUDGET DIRECTOR A COMPREHENSIVE REPORT DETAILING THE NUMBER OF ACADEMIC PROGRAM PARTNERSHIPS BETWEEN PUBLIC COMMUNITY COLLEGES, PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES, AND PRIVATE COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION:

(A) THE NAMES OF THE BACCALAUREATE DEGREE PROGRAMS OF STUDY OFFERED BY PUBLIC AND PRIVATE UNIVERSITIES ON COMMUNITY COLLEGE CAMPUSES.

(B) THE NAMES OF THE ARTICULATION AGREEMENTS FOR BACCALAUREATE DEGREE PROGRAMS OF STUDY BETWEEN PUBLIC COMMUNITY COLLEGES, PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES, AND PRIVATE COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES.

(C) THE NUMBER OF STUDENTS ENROLLED AND NUMBER OF DEGREES AWARDED THROUGH ARTICULATION AGREEMENTS, AND THE NUMBER OF COURSES OFFERED, NUMBER OF STUDENTS ENROLLED, AND NUMBER OF DEGREES AWARDED THROUGH ON‑CAMPUS PROGRAMS NAMED IN SUBDIVISION (A) FROM JULY 1, 2017 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2018.

SEC. 215. BY OCTOBER 31, EACH COMMUNITY COLLEGE RECEIVING FUNDS UNDER SECTION 201 SHALL REPORT TO THE SENATE AND HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS SUBCOMMITTEES ON COMMUNITY COLLEGES, THE SENATE AND HOUSE FISCAL AGENCIES, AND THE STATE BUDGET DIRECTOR ITS ANNUAL TITLE IX REPORT, ALSO KNOWN AS THE STUDENT SEXUAL MISCONDUCT REPORT, ISSUED BY THE TITLE IX COORDINATOR, AS REQUIRED UNDER THE FEDERAL CAMPUS SAVE ACT OF 2013, PUBLIC LAW 113‑4, SECTION 304, 127 STAT 54, 89‑92 (2013).

Sec. 217. (1) The center shall do all of the following:

(a) Establish, maintain, and coordinate the state community college database commonly known as the “activities classification structure” or “ACS” database.”MICHIGAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE DATA INVENTORY”.

(b) Collect data concerning community colleges and community college programs in this state, including data required by law.

(c) Establish procedures to ensure the validity and reliability of the data and the collection process.

(d) Develop model data collection policies, including, but not limited to, policies that ensure the privacy of any individual student data. Privacy policies shall ensure that student social security numbers are not released to the public for any purpose.

(e) Provide data in a useful manner to allow state policymakers and community college officials to make informed policy decisions.

(F) WORK WITH THE TALENT INVESTMENT AGENCY IN THE DEPARTMENT OF TALENT AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT TO COMPILE AND PUBLISH ELECTRONICALLY THE DEMOGRAPHIC ENROLLMENT PROFILE.

(2) There is created within the center the activities classification structure MICHIGAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE DATA INVENTORY advisory committee. The committee shall provide advice to the director of the center regarding the management of the state community college database, including, but not limited to:

(a) Determining what data are necessary to collect and maintain to enable state and community college officials to make informed policy decisions.

(b) Defining the roles of all stakeholders in the data collection system.

(c) Recommending timelines for the implementation and ongoing collection of data.

(d) Establishing and maintaining data definitions, data transmission protocols, and system specifications and procedures for the efficient and accurate transmission and collection of data.

(e) Establishing and maintaining a process for ensuring the accuracy of the data.

(f) Establishing and maintaining policies related to data collection, including, but not limited to, privacy policies related to individual student data.

(g) Ensuring that the data are made available to state policymakers and citizens of this state in the most useful format possible.

(h) Addressing other matters as determined by the director of the center or as required by law.

(3) The activities classification structure MICHIGAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE DATA INVENTORY advisory committee created in subsection (2) shall consist of the following members:

(a) One representative from the house fiscal agency, appointed by the director of the house fiscal agency.

(b) One representative from the senate fiscal agency, appointed by the director of the senate fiscal agency.

(c) One representative from the workforce development agency, appointed by the director of the workforce development agency.

(d) One representative from the center appointed by the director of the center.

(e) One representative from the state budget office, appointed by the state budget director.

(f) One representative from the governor’s policy office, appointed by that office.

(g) Four representatives of the Michigan Community College Association, appointed by the president of the association. From the groupings of community colleges given in table 17 of the activities classification structure THE MICHIGAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE DATA INVENTORY database described in subsection (1), the association shall appoint 1 representative each from group 1, group 2, and group 3, and 1 representative from either group 3 or 4.

Sec. 225. Each community college shall report to the center by August 31 of each year the tuition and mandatory fees paid by a full‑time in‑district student and a full‑time out‑of‑district student as established by the college governing board for the current academic year. This report should also include the annual cost of attendance TUITION AND FEES based on a full‑time course load of 30 credits. THIS REPORT MUST ALSO SPECIFY THE AMOUNT THAT TUITION AND FEES HAVE INCREASED FOR EACH INSTITUTION FROM THE PRIOR ACADEMIC YEAR. Each community college shall also report any revisions to the reported current academic year tuition and mandatory fees adopted by the college governing board to the center within 15 days of being adopted. The center shall provide this information and any revisions to the house and senate fiscal agencies and the state budget director.

Sec. 226. Each community college shall report to the center BY OCTOBER 15 OF EACH YEAR the numbers and type of associate degrees and other certificates awarded by the community college during the previous fiscal ACADEMIC year . The report shall be made not later than November 15 of each year. Community colleges shall work with the center to develop a systematic approach for meeting this requirement using the P‑20 longitudinal data system.

Sec. 229. (1) Each community college that receives an appropriation in section 201 is expected to include in its admission application process a specific question as to whether an applicant for admission has ever served or is currently serving in the United States Armed Forces or is the spouse or dependent of an individual who has served or is currently serving in the United States Armed Forces, in order to more quickly identify potential educational assistance available to that applicant.

(2) It is expected that each public community college that receives an appropriation in section 201 shall work with the house and senate community college subcommittees, the Michigan Community College Association, and veterans groups to review the issue of in‑district tuition for veterans of this state when determining tuition rates and fees.

(3) As used in this section, “veteran” means an honorably discharged veteran entitled to educational assistance under the provisions of section 5003 of the post‑911 veterans educational assistance act of 2008, 38 USC 3301 to 3325.3327.

Sec. 229a. Included in the fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 appropriations for the department of technology, management, and budget are appropriations totaling $30,879,600.00 $36,378,100.00 to provide funding for the state share of costs for previously constructed capital projects for community colleges. Those appropriations for state building authority rent represent additional state general fund support for community colleges, and the following is an estimate of the amount of that support to each community college:

(a) Alpena Community College, $630,000.00.$876,300.00.

(b) Bay de Noc Community College, $682,400.00.$677,000.00.

(c) Delta College, $3,347,300.00.$3,798,700.00.

(d) Glen Oaks Community College, $124,000.00.$123,000.00.

(e) Gogebic Community College, $56,400.00.$56,000.00.

(f) Grand Rapids Community College, $2,075,300.00.$2,536,500.00.

(g) Henry Ford College, $1,036,200.00.$1,028,000.00.

(h) Jackson College, $2,264,800.00.$2,164,000.00.

(i) Kalamazoo Valley Community College, $1,957,400.00.$1,942,000.00.

(j) Kellogg Community College, $524,100.00.$681,300.00.

(k) Kirtland Community College, $365,900.00.$591,800.00.

(l) Lake Michigan College, $342,700.00.$975,800.00.

(m) Lansing Community College, $1,150,000.00.$1,141,000.00.

(n) Macomb Community College, $1,662,100.00.$1,649,000.00.

(o) Mid Michigan Community College, $1,627,800.00.$1,615,000.00.

(p) Monroe County Community College, $1,273,000.00.$1,544,300.00.

(q) Montcalm Community College, $978,700.00.$971,000.00.

(r) C.S. Mott Community College, $1,817,300.00.$2,107,200.00.

(s) Muskegon Community College, $570,500.00.$989,000.00.

(t) North Central Michigan College, $416,300.00.$668,000.00.

(u) Northwestern Michigan College, $1,315,400.00.$1,844,900.00.

(v) Oakland Community College, $468,700.00.$465,000.00.

(w) Schoolcraft College, $1,558,300.00.$2,296,000.00.

(x) Southwestern Michigan College, $531,700.00.$887,500.00.

(y) St. Clair County Community College, $358,800.00.$723,500.00.

(z) Washtenaw Community College, $1,689,300.00.$1,826,000.00.

(aa) Wayne County Community College, $1,473,600.00.$1,462,000.00.

(bb) West Shore Community College, $581,600.00.$738,300.00.

Sec. 230. (1) Money included in the appropriations for community college operations under section 201(2) in fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for performance funding is distributed based on the following formula:

(a) Allocated proportionate to fiscal year 2016‑2017 2017‑2018 base appropriations, 30%.

(b) Based on a weighted student contact hour formula as provided for in the 2016 recommendations of the performance indicators task force, 30%.

(c) Based on the performance improvement as provided for in the 2016 recommendations of the performance indicators task force, 10%.

(d) Based on the performance completion number as provided for in the 2016 recommendations of the performance indicators task force, 10%.

(e) Based on the performance completion rate as provided for in the 2016 recommendations of the performance indicators task force, 10%.

(f) Based on administrative costs, 5%.

(g) Based on the local strategic value component, as developed in cooperation with the Michigan Community College Association and described in subsection (2), 5%.

(2) Money included in the appropriations for community college operations under section 201(2) for local strategic value shall be allocated to each community college that certifies to the state budget director, through a board of trustees resolution on or before October 15, 2017, 2018, that the college has met 4 out of 5 best practices listed in each category described in subsection (3). The resolution shall provide specifics as to how the community college meets each best practice measure within each category. One‑third of funding available under the strategic value component shall be allocated to each category described in subsection (3). Amounts distributed under local strategic value shall be on a proportionate basis to each college’s fiscal year 2016‑2017 2017‑2018 operations funding. Payments to community colleges that qualify for local strategic value funding shall be distributed with the November installment payment described in section 206.

(3) For purposes of subsection (2), the following categories of best practices reflect functional activities of community colleges that have strategic value to the local communities and regional economies:

(a) For Category A, economic development and business or industry partnerships, the following:

(i) The community college has active partnerships with local employers including hospitals and health care providers.

(ii) The community college provides customized on‑site training for area companies, employees, or both.

(iii) The community college supports entrepreneurship through a small business assistance center or other training or consulting activities targeted toward small businesses.

(iv) The community college supports technological advancement through industry partnerships, incubation activities, or operation of a Michigan technical education center or other advanced technology center.

(v) The community college has active partnerships with local or regional workforce and economic development agencies.

(b) For Category B, educational partnerships, the following:

(i) The community college has active partnerships with regional high schools, intermediate school districts, and career‑tech centers to provide instruction through dual enrollment, concurrent enrollment, direct credit, middle college, or academy programs.

(ii) The community college hosts, sponsors, or participates in enrichment programs for area K‑12 students, such as college days, summer or after‑school programming, or Science Olympiad.

(iii) The community college provides, supports, or participates in programming to promote successful transitions to college for traditional age students, including grant programs such as talent search, upward bound, or other activities to promote college readiness in area high schools and community centers.

(iv) The community college provides, supports, or participates in programming to promote successful transitions to college for new or reentering adult students, such as adult basic education, a high school equivalency test preparation program and testing, or recruiting, advising, or orientation activities specific to adults. As used in this subparagraph, “high school equivalency test preparation program” means that term as defined in section 4.

(v) The community college has active partnerships with regional 4‑year colleges and universities to promote successful transfer, such as articulation, 2+2, or reverse transfer agreements or operation of a university center.

(c) For Category C, community services, the following:

(i) The community college provides continuing education programming for leisure, wellness, personal enrichment, or professional development.

(ii) The community college operates or sponsors opportunities for community members to engage in activities that promote leisure, wellness, cultural or personal enrichment such as community sports teams, theater or musical ensembles, or artist guilds.

(iii) The community college operates public facilities to promote cultural, educational, or personal enrichment for community members, such as libraries, computer labs, performing arts centers, museums, art galleries, or television or radio stations.

(iv) The community college operates public facilities to promote leisure or wellness activities for community members, including gymnasiums, athletic fields, tennis courts, fitness centers, hiking or biking trails, or natural areas.

(v) The community college promotes, sponsors, or hosts community service activities for students, staff, or community members.

(4) Payments for performance funding under section 201(2) shall be made to a community college only if that community college actively participates in the Michigan Transfer Network sponsored by the Michigan Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers and submits timely updates, including updated course equivalencies at least every 6 months, to the Michigan transfer network. The state budget director shall determine if a community college has not satisfied this requirement. The state budget director may withhold payments for performance funding until a community college is in compliance with this section.

Sec. 236. (1) Subject to the conditions set forth in this article, the amounts listed in this section are appropriated for higher education for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2018, 2019, from the funds indicated in this section. The following is a summary of the appropriations in this section:

(a) The gross appropriation is $1,629,224,400.00. $1,669,732,600.00. After deducting total interdepartmental grants and intradepartmental transfers in the amount of $0.00, the adjusted gross appropriation is $1,629,224,400.00.$1,669,732,600.00.

(b) The sources of the adjusted gross appropriation described in subdivision (a) are as follows:

(i) Total federal revenues, $111,526,400.00.$123,526,400.00.

(ii) Total local revenues, $0.00.

(iii) Total private revenues, $0.00.

(iv) Total other state restricted revenues, $238,443,500.00.$500,188,300.00.

(v) State general fund/general purpose money, $1,279,254,500.00.$1,046,017,900.00.

(2) Amounts appropriated for public universities are as follows:

(a) The appropriation for Central Michigan University is $85,654,400.00, $83,925,500.00 for operations and $1,728,900.00 for performance funding.$87,415,000.00, $85,654,400.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $1,760,600.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(b) The appropriation for Eastern Michigan University is $75,169,900.00, $73,593,800.00 for operations and $1,576,100.00 for performance funding.$76,979,300.00, $75,169,900.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $1,809,400.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(c) The appropriation for Ferris State University is $53,595,500.00, $52,259,900.00 for operations and $1,335,600.00 for performance funding.$54,950,700.00, $53,595,500.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $1,355,200.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(d) The appropriation for Grand Valley State University is $70,100,100.00, $68,227,900.00 for operations and $1,872,200.00 for performance funding.$72,056,600.00, $70,100,100.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $1,956,500.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(e) The appropriation for Lake Superior State University is $13,775,000.00, $13,567,400.00 for operations and $207,600.00 for performance funding.$13,987,000.00, $13,775,000.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $212,000.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(f) The appropriation for Michigan State University is $344,404,800.00, $275,862,100.00 for operations, $5,377,000.00 for performance funding, $33,913,100.00 for MSU AgBioResearch, and $29,252,600.00 for MSU Extension.$350,703,300.00, $281,239,100.00 FOR OPERATIONS, $5,035,100.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING, $34,591,400.00 FOR MSU AGBIORESEARCH, AND $29,837,700.00 FOR MSU EXTENSION.

(g) The appropriation for Michigan Technological University is $49,052,200.00, $48,097,500.00 for operations and $954,700.00 for performance funding.$49,949,600.00, $49,052,200.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $897,400.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(h) The appropriation for Northern Michigan University is $47,137,400.00, $46,279,200.00 for operations and $858,200.00 for performance funding.$47,998,400.00, $47,137,400.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $861,000.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(i) The appropriation for Oakland University is $51,235,900.00, $49,920,700.00 for operations and $1,315,200.00 for performance funding.$52,819,200.00, $51,235,900.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $1,583,300.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(j) The appropriation for Saginaw Valley State University is $29,766,100.00, $29,114,000.00 for operations and $652,100.00 for performance funding.$30,528,000.00, $29,766,100.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $761,900.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(k) The appropriation for University of Michigan – Ann Arbor is $314,589,100.00, $308,639,000.00 for operations and $5,950,100.00 for performance funding.$320,782,400.00, $314,589,100.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $6,193,300.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(l) The appropriation for University of Michigan – Dearborn is $25,421,900.00, $24,803,300.00 for operations and $618,600.00 for performance funding.$26,071,800.00, $25,421,900.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $649,900.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(m) The appropriation for University of Michigan – Flint is $23,061,800.00, $22,549,300.00 for operations and $512,500.00 for performance funding.$23,585,400.00, $23,061,800.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $523,600.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(n) The appropriation for Wayne State University is $199,169,800.00, $196,064,500.00 for operations and $3,105,300.00 for performance funding.$202,363,200.00, $199,169,800.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $3,193,400.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(o) The appropriation for Western Michigan University is $109,376,800.00, $107,440,900.00 for operations and $1,935,900.00 for performance funding.$111,151,000.00, $109,376,800.00 FOR OPERATIONS AND $1,774,200.00 FOR PERFORMANCE FUNDING.

(3) The amount appropriated in subsection (2) for public universities is appropriated from the following:

(a) State school aid fund, $231,219,500.00.$494,286,300.00.

(b) State general fund/general purpose money, $1,260,291,200.00.$1,027,054,600.00.

(4) The amount appropriated for Michigan public school employees’ retirement system reimbursement is $6,705,000.00, $5,133,000.00, appropriated from the state school aid fund.

(5) The amount appropriated for state and regional programs is $315,000.00, appropriated from general fund/general purpose money and allocated as follows:

(a) Higher education database modernization and conversion, $200,000.00.

(b) Midwestern Higher Education Compact, $115,000.00.

(6) The amount appropriated for the Martin Luther King, Jr. ‑ Cesar Chavez ‑ Rosa Parks program is $2,691,500.00, appropriated from general fund/general purpose money and allocated as follows:

(a) Select student support services, $1,956,100.00.

(b) Michigan college/university partnership program, $586,800.00.

(c) Morris Hood, Jr. educator development program, $148,600.00.

(7) Subject to subsection (8), the amount appropriated for grants and financial aid is $127,583,200.00, $139,583,200.00, allocated as follows:

(a) State competitive scholarships, $26,361,700.00.$32,361,700.00.

(b) Tuition grants, $38,021,500.00.

(c) Tuition incentive program, $58,300,000.00.$64,300,000.00.

(d) Children of veterans and officer’s survivor tuition grant programs, $1,400,000.00.

(e) Project GEAR‑UP, $3,200,000.00.

(f) North American Indian tuition waiver, $300,000.00.

(8) The money appropriated in subsection (7) for grants and financial aid is appropriated from the following:

(a) Federal revenues under the United States Department of Education, Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, GEAR‑UP program, $3,200,000.00.

(b) Federal revenues under the social security act, temporary assistance for needy families, $108,326,400.00.$120,326,400.00.

(c) Contributions to children of veterans tuition grant program, $100,000.00.

(d) State general fund/general purpose money, $15,956,800.00.

(9) For fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 only, in addition to the allocation under subsection (4), from the appropriations described in subsection (1), there is allocated an amount not to exceed $419,000.00 $669,000.00 for payments to participating public universities, appropriated from the state school aid fund. A university that receives money under this subsection shall use that money solely for the purpose of offsetting the normal cost contribution rate. As used in this subsection, “participating public universities” means public universities that are a reporting unit of the Michigan public school employees’ retirement system under the public school employees retirement act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, MCL 38.1301 to 38.1437, and that pay contributions to the Michigan public school employees’ retirement system for the state fiscal year.

Sec. 236a. It is the intent of the legislature to provide appropriations for the fiscal year ending on September 30, 2019 2020 for the items listed in section 236. The fiscal year 2018‑2019 2019‑2020 appropriations are anticipated to be the same as those for fiscal year 2017‑2018, 2018‑2019, except that the amounts will be adjusted for changes in caseload and related costs, federal fund match rates, economic factors, and available revenue. These adjustments will be determined after the January 2018 2019 consensus revenue estimating conference.

Sec. 236b. In addition to the funds appropriated in section 236, there is appropriated for grants and financial aid in fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 an amount not to exceed $6,000,000.00 for federal contingency funds. These funds are not available for expenditure until they have been transferred under section 393(2) of the management and budget act, 1984 PA 431, MCL 18.1393, for another purpose under this article.

Sec. 236c. In addition to the funds appropriated for fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 in section 236, appropriations to the department of technology, management, and budget in the act providing general appropriations for fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for state building authority rent, totaling an estimated $144,995,300.00, $155,478,500.00, provide funding for the state share of costs for previously constructed capital projects for state universities. These appropriations for state building authority rent represent additional state general fund support provided to public universities, and the following is an estimate of the amount of that support to each university:

(a) Central Michigan University, $12,570,900.00.$12,936,500.00.

(b) Eastern Michigan University, $5,177,500.00.$7,083,900.00.

(c) Ferris State University, $6,658,300.00.$8,275,000.00.

(d) Grand Valley State University, $7,057,800.00.$8,800,000.00.

(e) Lake Superior State University, $1,832,400.00.$2,285,800.00.

(f) Michigan State University, $15,500,500.00.$16,790,400.00.

(g) Michigan Technological University, $7,225,100.00.$6,782,000.00.

(h) Northern Michigan University, $7,786,500.00.$7,309,000.00.

(i) Oakland University, $13,492,400.00.$12,665,000.00.

(j) Saginaw Valley State University, $10,918,500.00.$10,984,000.00.

(k) University of Michigan ‑ Ann Arbor, $10,586,200.00.$11,861,000.00.

(l) University of Michigan ‑ Dearborn, $9,581,500.00.$10,918,000.00.

(m) University of Michigan ‑ Flint, $4,315,600.00.$6,244,800.00.

(n) Wayne State University, $16,378,300.00.$16,480,200.00.

(o) Western Michigan University, $15,913,800.00.$16,062,900.00.

SEC. 236F. SUBJECT TO THE CONDITIONS SET FORTH IN THIS ARTICLE, THE ALLOCATION OF THE AMOUNT APPROPRIATED FOR GRANTS AND FINANCIAL AID UNDER SECTION 236(7) FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2018 IS REVISED AS FOLLOWS:

(A) THE ALLOCATION FOR STATE COMPETITIVE SCHOLARSHIPS UNDER SECTION 236(7)(A) IS INCREASED $6,000,000.00, RESULTING IN A TOTAL ALLOCATION OF $32,361,700.00 FOR STATE COMPETITIVE SCHOLARSHIPS UNDER SECTION 236(7)(A) FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2018.

(B) THE ALLOCATION FOR TUITION GRANTS UNDER SECTION 236(7)(B) IS DECREASED $6,000,000.00, RESULTING IN A TOTAL ALLOCATION OF $32,021,500.00 FOR TUITION GRANTS UNDER

SECTION 236(7)(B) FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2018.

Sec. 241. (1) Subject to sections 244 and 265a, the funds appropriated in section 236 to public universities shall be paid out of the state treasury and distributed by the state treasurer to the respective institutions in 11 equal monthly installments on the sixteenth of each month, or the next succeeding business day, beginning with October 16, 2017. 2018. Except for Wayne State University, each institution shall accrue its July and August 2018 2019 payments to its institutional fiscal year ending June 30, 2018.2019.

(2) All public universities shall submit higher education institutional data inventory (HEIDI) data and associated financial and program information requested by and in a manner prescribed by the state budget director. For public universities with fiscal years ending June 30, 2017, 2018, these data shall be submitted to the state budget director by October 15, 2017. 2018. Public universities with a fiscal year ending September 30, 2017 2018 shall submit preliminary HEIDI data by November 15, 2017 2018 and final data by December 15, 2017. 2018. If a public university fails to submit HEIDI data and associated financial aid program information in accordance with this reporting schedule, the state treasurer may withhold the monthly installments under subsection (1) to the public university until those data are submitted.

Sec. 245. (1) A public university shall maintain a public transparency website available through a link on its website homepage. The public university shall update this website within 30 days after the university’s governing board adopts its annual operating budget for the next academic year, or after the governing board adopts a subsequent revision to that budget.

(2) The website required under subsection (1) shall include all of the following concerning the public university:

(a) The annual operating budget and subsequent budget revisions.

(b) A summary of current expenditures for the most recent fiscal year for which they are available, expressed as pie charts in the following 2 categories:

(i) A chart of personnel expenditures, broken into the following subcategories:

(A) Earnings and wages.

(B) Employee benefit costs, including, but not limited to, medical, dental, vision, life, disability, and long‑term care benefits.

(C) Retirement benefit costs.

(D) All other personnel costs.

(ii) A chart of all current expenditures the public university reported as part of its higher education institutional data inventory data under section 241(2), broken into the same subcategories in which it reported those data.

(c) Links to all of the following for the public university:

(i) The current collective bargaining agreement for each bargaining unit.

(ii) Each health care benefits plan, including, but not limited to, medical, dental, vision, disability, long‑term care, or any other type of benefits that would constitute health care services, offered to any bargaining unit or employee of the public university.

(iii) Audits and financial reports for the most recent fiscal year for which they are available.

(iv) Campus security policies and crime statistics pursuant to the student right‑to‑know and campus security act, Public Law 101‑542, 104 Stat 2381. Information shall include all material prepared pursuant to the public information reporting requirements under the crime awareness and campus security act of 1990, title II of the student righttoknow and campus security act, Public Law 101‑542, 104 Stat 2381.

(d) A list of all positions funded partially or wholly through institutional general fund revenue that includes the position title and annual salary or wage amount for each position.

(e) General fund revenue and expenditure projections for the current fiscal year and the next fiscal year.

(f) A listing of all debt service obligations, detailed by project, anticipated fiscal year payment for each project, and total outstanding debt for the current fiscal year.

(g) The institution’s policy regarding the transferability of core college courses between community colleges and the university.

(h) A listing of all community colleges that have entered into reverse transfer agreements with the university.

(3) On the website required under subsection (1), a public university shall provide a dashboard or report card demonstrating the university’s performance in several “best practice” measures. The dashboard or report card shall include at least all of the following for the 3 most recent academic years for which the data are available:

(a) Enrollment.

(b) Student retention rate.

(c) Six‑year graduation rates.

(d) Number of Pell grant recipients and graduating Pell grant recipients.

(e) Geographic origination of students, categorized as in‑state, out‑of‑state, and international.

(f) Faculty to student ratios and total university employee to student ratios.

(g) Teaching load by faculty classification.

(h) Graduation outcome rates, including employment and continuing education.

(4) For statewide consistency and public visibility, public universities must use the icon badge provided by the department of technology, management, and budget consistent with the icon badge developed by the department of education for K‑12 school districts. It must appear on the front of each public university’s homepage. The size of the icon may be reduced to 150 x 150 pixels. The font size and style for this reporting must be consistent with other documents on each university’s website.

(5) The state budget director shall determine whether a public university has complied with this section. The state budget director may withhold a public university’s monthly installments described in section 241 until the public university complies with this section.

(6) By November 15 of each year, a public university shall report the following information to the center and post the information on its website under the budget transparency icon badge:

(a) Opportunities for earning college credit through the following programs:

(i) State approved career and technical education or a tech prep articulated program of study.

(ii) Direct college credit or concurrent enrollment.

(iii) Dual enrollment.

(iv) An early college/middle college program.

(b) For each program described in subdivision (a) that the public university offers, all of the following information:

(i) The number of high school students participating in the program.

(ii) The number of school districts that participate in the program with the public university.

(iii) Whether a university professor, qualified local school district employee, or other individual teaches the course or courses in the program.

(iv) The total cost to the public university to operate the program.

(v) The cost per credit hour for the course or courses in the program.

(vi) The location where the course or courses in the program are held.

(vii) Instructional resources offered to the program instructors.

(viii) Resources offered to the student in the program.

(ix) Transportation services provided to students in the program.

SEC. 245A. (1) A PUBLIC UNIVERSITY SHALL DEVELOP, MAINTAIN, AND UPDATE A “CAMPUS SAFETY INFORMATION AND RESOURCES” LINK, PROMINENTLY DISPLAYED ON THE HOMEPAGE OF ITS WEBSITE, TO A SECTION OF ITS WEBSITE CONTAINING ALL OF THE INFORMATION REQUIRED UNDER SUBSECTION (2).

(2) THE “CAMPUS SAFETY INFORMATION AND RESOURCES” SECTION OF A PUBLIC UNIVERSITY’S WEBSITE SHALL INCLUDE, BUT NOT BE LIMITED TO, ALL OF THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION:

(A) EMERGENCY CONTACT NUMBERS FOR POLICE, FIRE, HEALTH, AND OTHER SERVICES.

(B) HOURS, LOCATIONS, PHONE NUMBERS, AND ELECTRONIC MAIL CONTACTS FOR CAMPUS PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICES AND TITLE IX OFFICES.

(C) A LISTING OF SAFETY AND SECURITY SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE UNIVERSITY, INCLUDING TRANSPORTATION, ESCORT SERVICES, BUILDING SURVEILLANCE, ANONYMOUS TIP LINES, AND OTHER AVAILABLE SECURITY SERVICES.

(D) A PUBLIC UNIVERSITY’S POLICIES APPLICABLE TO MINORS ON UNIVERSITY PROPERTY.

(E) A DIRECTORY OF RESOURCES AVAILABLE AT THE UNIVERSITY OR SURROUNDING COMMUNITY FOR STUDENTS OR EMPLOYEES WHO ARE SURVIVORS OF SEXUAL ASSAULT OR SEXUAL ABUSE.

(F) AN ELECTRONIC COPY OF “A RESOURCE HANDBOOK FOR CAMPUS SEXUAL ASSAULT SURVIVORS, FRIENDS AND FAMILY”, PUBLISHED IN 2018 BY THE OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE FIRST LADY OF MICHIGAN.

(G) CAMPUS SECURITY POLICIES AND CRIME STATISTICS PURSUANT TO THE STUDENT RIGHT‑TO‑KNOW AND CAMPUS SECURITY ACT, PUBLIC LAW 101‑542, 104 STAT 2381. INFORMATION SHALL INCLUDE ALL MATERIAL PREPARED PURSUANT TO THE PUBLIC INFORMATION REPORTING REQUIREMENTS UNDER THE CRIME AWARENESS AND CAMPUS SECURITY ACT OF 1990, TITLE II OF THE STUDENT RIGHT‑TO‑KNOW AND CAMPUS SECURITY ACT, PUBLIC LAW 101‑542, 104 STAT 2381.

(3) A PUBLIC UNIVERSITY SHALL CERTIFY TO THE STATE BUDGET DIRECTOR BY AUGUST 31, 2018 THAT IT IS IN COMPLIANCE WITH THIS SECTION. THE STATE BUDGET DIRECTOR MAY WITHHOLD A PUBLIC UNIVERSITY’S MONTHLY INSTALLMENTS DESCRIBED IN SECTION 241 UNTIL THE PUBLIC UNIVERSITY COMPLIES WITH THIS SECTION.

Sec. 251. (1) Payments of the amounts included in section 236 for the state competitive scholarship program shall be distributed pursuant to 1964 PA 208, MCL 390.971 to 390.981.

(2) Pursuant to section 6 of 1964 PA 208, MCL 390.976, the department of treasury shall determine an actual maximum state competitive scholarship award per student, which shall be not less than $1,000.00, that ensures that the aggregate payments for the state competitive scholarship program do not exceed the appropriation contained in section 236 for the state competitive scholarship program. If the department determines that insufficient funds are available to establish a maximum award amount equal to at least $1,000.00, the department shall immediately report to the house and senate appropriations subcommittees on higher education, the house and senate fiscal agencies, and the state budget director regarding the estimated amount of additional funds necessary to establish a $1,000.00 maximum award amount.

(3) The department of treasury shall implement a proportional competitive scholarship maximum award level for recipients enrolled less than full‑time in a given semester or term.

(4) If a student who receives an award under this section has his or her tuition and fees paid under the Michigan educational trust program, pursuant to the Michigan education trust act, 1986 PA 316, MCL 390.1421 to 390.1442, and still has financial need, the funds awarded under this section may be used for educational expenses other than tuition and fees.

(5) If the department of treasury increases the maximum award per eligible student from that provided in the previous fiscal year, it shall not have the effect of reducing the number of eligible students receiving awards in relation to the total number of eligible applicants. Any increase in the maximum grant shall be proportional for all eligible students receiving awards.

(6) Veterans Administration benefits shall not be considered in determining eligibility for the award of scholarships under 1964 PA 208, MCL 390.971 to 390.981.

(7) Any unexpended and unencumbered funds remaining on September 30, 2018 2019 from the amounts appropriated in section 236 for the state competitive scholarship program for fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 do not lapse on September 30, 2018, 2019, but continue to be available for the expenditure for state competitive scholarships provided in the 2018‑2019 2019‑2020 fiscal year under a work project account. The use of these unexpended fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 funds terminates at the end of the 2018‑2019 2019‑2020 fiscal year.

Sec. 252. (1) The amounts appropriated in section 236 for the state tuition grant program shall be distributed pursuant to 1966 PA 313, MCL 390.991 to 390.997a.

(2) Tuition grant awards shall be made to all eligible Michigan residents enrolled in undergraduate degree programs who are qualified and who apply before July 1, 2017 for the 2017‑2018 academic year. Beginning with the 2018‑2019 academic year, tuition grant awards shall be made to all eligible Michigan residents enrolled in undergraduate degree programs who are qualified and who apply before March 1 of each year for the next academic year.

(3) Beginning with the 20182019 academic year, a tuition grant may be renewed for not more than 10 semesters or its equivalent in trimesters or quarters of undergraduate education, or if an eligible applicant has not completed using the grant within 10 years after his or her eligibility is determined, whichever occurs first. The department shall determine an equivalent to 10 semesters or its equivalent in trimesters or quarters of undergraduate education for less than fulltime but more than halftime students.

(3) (4) Pursuant to section 5 of 1966 PA 313, MCL 390.995, and subject to subsections (8) (7) and (9), (8), the department of treasury shall determine an actual maximum tuition grant award per student, which shall be no less than $2,000.00, $2,400.00, that ensures that the aggregate payments for the tuition grant program do not exceed the appropriation contained in section 236 for the state tuition grant program. If the department determines that insufficient funds are available to establish a maximum award amount equal to at least $2,000.00, $2,400.00, the department shall immediately report to the house and senate appropriations subcommittees on higher education, the house and senate fiscal agencies, and the state budget director regarding the estimated amount of additional funds necessary to establish a $2,000.00 $2,400.00 maximum award amount. If the department determines that sufficient funds are available to establish a maximum award amount equal to at least $2,000.00, $2,400.00, the department shall immediately report to the house and senate appropriations subcommittees on higher education, the house and senate fiscal agencies, and the state budget director regarding the maximum award amount established and the projected amount of any projected year‑end appropriation balance based on that maximum award amount. By February 18 of each fiscal year, the department shall analyze the status of award commitments, shall make any necessary adjustments, and shall confirm that those award commitments will not exceed the appropriation contained in section 236 for the tuition grant program. The determination and actions shall be reported to the state budget director and the house and senate fiscal agencies no later than the final day of February of each year. If award adjustments are necessary, the students shall be notified of the adjustment by March 4 of each year.

(4) (5) Any unexpended and unencumbered funds remaining on September 30, 2018 2019 from the amounts appropriated in section 236 for the tuition grant program for fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 do not lapse on September 30, 2018, 2019, but continue to be available for expenditure for tuition grants provided in the 2018‑2019 2019‑2020 fiscal year under a work project account. The use of these unexpended fiscal year 20172018 funds terminates at the end of the 20182019 fiscal year.

(5) (6) The department of treasury shall continue a proportional tuition grant maximum award level for recipients enrolled less than full‑time in a given semester or term.

(6) (7) If the department of treasury increases the maximum award per eligible student from that provided in the previous fiscal year, it shall not have the effect of reducing the number of eligible students receiving awards in relation to the total number of eligible applicants. Any increase in the maximum grant shall be proportional for all eligible students receiving awards for that fiscal year.

(7) (8) Except as provided in subsection (5), (4), the department of treasury shall not award more than $3,500,000.00 $4,200,000.00 in tuition grants to eligible students enrolled in the same independent nonprofit college or university in this state. Any decrease in the maximum grant shall be proportional for all eligible students enrolled in that college or university, as determined by the department. THE LIMIT DESCRIBED IN THIS SUBSECTION DOES NOT APPLY TO ANY OTHER STUDENT FINANCIAL AID PROGRAM OR IN COMBINATION WITH ANY OTHER STUDENT FINANCIAL AID PROGRAM.

(8) (9) The department of treasury shall not award tuition grants to otherwise eligible students enrolled in an independent college or university that does not report, in a form and manner directed by and satisfactory to the department of treasury, by October 31 of each year, all of the following:

(a) The number of students in the most recently completed academic year who in any academic year received a state tuition grant at the reporting institution and successfully completed a program or graduated.

(b) The number of students in the most recently completed academic year who in any academic year received a state tuition grant at the reporting institution and took a remedial education class.

(c) The number of students in the most recently completed academic year who in any academic year received a Pell grant at the reporting institution and successfully completed a program or graduated.

(9) (10) By February 1, 2018, 2019, each independent college and university participating in the tuition grant program shall report to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on higher education, the senate and house fiscal agencies, and the state budget director on its efforts to develop and implement sexual assault response training for the institution’s title IX coordinator, campus law enforcement personnel, campus public safety personnel, and any other campus personnel charged with responding to on‑campus incidents, including information on sexual assault response training materials and the status of implementing sexual assault response training for institutional personnel.

Sec. 256. (1) The funds appropriated in section 236 for the tuition incentive program shall be distributed as provided in this section and pursuant to the administrative procedures for the tuition incentive program of the department of treasury.

(2) As used in this section:

(a) “Phase I” means the first part of the tuition incentive program defined as the academic period of 80 semester or 120 term credits, or less, leading to an associate degree or certificate. Students must be enrolled in a certificate or associate degree program and taking classes within the program of study for a certificate or associate degree. Tuition will not be covered for courses outside of a certificate or associate degree program.

(b) “Phase II” means the second part of the tuition incentive program which provides assistance in the third and fourth year of 4‑year degree programs.

(c) “Department” means the department of treasury.

(d) “High school equivalency certificate” means that term as defined in section 4.

(3) An individual shall meet the following basic criteria and financial thresholds to be eligible for tuition incentive program benefits:

(a) To be eligible for phase I, an individual shall meet all of the following criteria:

(i) Apply for certification to the department any time after he or she begins the sixth grade but before August 31 of the school year in which he or she graduates from high school or before achieving a high school equivalency certificate.

(ii) Be less than 20 years of age at the time he or she graduates from high school with a diploma or certificate of completion or achieves a high school equivalency certificate or, for students attending a 5‑year middle college approved by the Michigan department of education, be less than 21 years of age when he or she graduates from high school.

(iii) Be a United States citizen and a resident of this state according to institutional criteria.

(iv) Be at least a half‑time student, earning less than 80 semester or 120 term credits at a participating educational institution within 4 years of high school graduation or achievement of a high school equivalency certificate. All program eligibility expires 6 years from high school graduation or achievement of a high school equivalency certificate.

(v) Meet the satisfactory academic progress policy of the educational institution he or she attends.

(b) To be eligible for phase II, an individual shall meet either of the following criteria in addition to the criteria in subdivision (a):

(i) Complete at least 56 transferable semester or 84 transferable term credits.

(ii) Obtain an associate degree or certificate at a participating institution.

(c) To be eligible for phase I or phase II, an individual must not be incarcerated and must be financially eligible as determined by the department. An individual is financially eligible for the tuition incentive program if he or she was eligible for Medicaid from this state for 24 months within the 36 consecutive months before application. The department shall accept certification of Medicaid eligibility only from the department of health and human services for the purposes of verifying if a person is Medicaid eligible for 24 months within the 36 consecutive months before application. Certification of eligibility may begin in the sixth grade. As used in this subdivision, “incarcerated” does not include detention of a juvenile in a state‑operated or privately operated juvenile detention facility.

(4) Beginning in fiscal year 20172018, the department shall not award more than $8,500,000.00 annually in tuition incentive program funds to eligible students enrolled in the same college or university in this state.

(4) (5) For phase I, the department shall provide payment on behalf of a person eligible under subsection (3). The department shall only accept standard per‑credit hour tuition billings and shall reject billings that are excessive or outside the guidelines for the type of educational institution.

(5) (6) For phase I, all of the following apply:

(a) Payments for associate degree or certificate programs shall not be made for more than 80 semester or 120 term credits for any individual student at any participating institution.

(b) For persons enrolled at a Michigan community college, the department shall pay the current in‑district tuition and mandatory fees. For persons residing in an area that is not included in any community college district, the out‑of‑district tuition rate may be authorized.

(c) For fiscal year 2017‑2018, for persons enrolled at a Michigan public university, the department shall pay lower division resident tuition and mandatory fees for the current year. Beginning in fiscal year 20182019, for persons enrolled at a Michigan public university, the department shall pay mandatory fees for the current year and a percredit payment that does not exceed 3 times the average community college in‑district per‑credit tuition rate as reported on August 1 for the immediately preceding academic year.

(d) For persons enrolled at a Michigan independent, nonprofit degree‑granting college or university, or a Michigan federal tribally controlled community college, or Focus: HOPE, the department shall pay mandatory fees for the current year and a per‑credit payment that does not exceed the average community college in‑district per‑credit tuition rate as reported on August 1, for the immediately preceding academic year.

(6) (7) A person participating in phase II may be eligible for additional funds not to exceed $500.00 per semester or $400.00 per term up to a maximum of $2,000.00 subject to the following conditions:

(a) Credits are earned in a 4‑year program at a Michigan degree‑granting 4‑year college or university.

(b) The tuition reimbursement is for coursework completed within 30 months of completion of the phase I requirements.

(7) (8) The department shall work closely with participating institutions to develop an application and eligibility determination process that will provide the highest level of participation and ensure that all requirements of the program are met.

(8) (9) Applications for the tuition incentive program may be approved at any time after the student begins the sixth grade. If a determination of financial eligibility is made, that determination is valid as long as the student meets all other program requirements and conditions.

(9) (10) Each institution shall ensure that all known available restricted grants for tuition and fees are used prior to billing the tuition incentive program for any portion of a student’s tuition and fees.

(10) (11) The department shall ensure that the tuition incentive program is well publicized and that eligible Medicaid clients are provided information on the program. The department shall provide the necessary funding and staff to fully operate the program.

(11) (12) Any unexpended and unencumbered funds remaining on September 30, 2018 2019 from the amounts appropriated in section 236 for the tuition incentive program for fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 do not lapse on September 30, 2018, 2019, but continue to be available for expenditure for tuition incentive program funds provided in the 2018‑2019 2019‑2020 fiscal year under a work project account. The use of these unexpended fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 funds terminates at the end of the 2018‑2019 2019‑2020 fiscal year.

(12) (13) The department of treasury shall collaborate with the center to use the P‑20 longitudinal data system to report the following information for each qualified postsecondary institution:

(a) The number of phase I students in the most recently completed academic year who in any academic year received a tuition incentive program award and who successfully completed a degree or certificate program. Cohort graduation rates for phase I students shall be calculated using the established success rate methodology developed by the center in collaboration with the postsecondary institutions.

(b) The number of students in the most recently completed academic year who in any academic year received a Pell grant at the reporting institution and who successfully completed a degree or certificate program. Cohort graduation rates for students who received Pell grants shall be calculated using the established success rate methodology developed by the center in collaboration with the postsecondary institutions.

(13) (14) If a qualified postsecondary institution does not report the data necessary to comply with subsection (13) (12) to the P‑20 longitudinal data system, the institution shall report, in a form and manner satisfactory to the department of treasury and the center, all of the information needed to comply with subsection (13) (12) by December 1, 2017.2019.

(14) (15) Beginning in fiscal year 2018‑2019, 2019‑2020, if a qualified postsecondary institution does not report the data necessary to complete the reporting in subsection (13) (12) to the P‑20 longitudinal data system by October 15 for the prior academic year, the department of treasury shall not award phase I tuition incentive program funding to otherwise eligible students enrolled in that institution until the data are submitted.

Sec. 263. (1) Included in the appropriation in section 236 for fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for MSU AgBioResearch is $2,982,900.00 and included in the appropriation in section 236 for MSU Extension is $2,645,200.00 for Project GREEEN. Project GREEEN is intended to address critical regulatory, food safety, economic, and environmental problems faced by this state’s plant‑based agriculture, forestry, and processing industries. “GREEEN” is an acronym for Generating Research and Extension to Meet Environmental and Economic Needs.

(2) The department of agriculture and rural development and Michigan State University, in consultation with agricultural commodity groups and other interested parties, shall develop Project GREEEN and its program priorities.

Sec. 264. Included in the appropriation in section 236 for fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for Michigan State University is $80,000.00 for the Michigan Future Farmers of America Association. This $80,000.00 allocation shall not supplant any existing support that Michigan State University provides to the Michigan Future Farmers of America Association.

Sec. 265. (1) Payments under section 265a for performance funding FOR FISCAL YEARS 2018‑2019, 2019‑2020, AND 2020‑2021 shall only be made to a public university that certifies to the state budget director by August 31, 2017 2018 that its board did not adopt an increase in tuition and fee rates for resident undergraduate students after September 1, 2016 2017 for the 2016‑2017 2017‑2018 academic year and that its board will not adopt an increase in tuition and fee rates for resident undergraduate students for the 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 academic year that is greater than 3.8% or $475.00, $490.00, whichever is greater. As used in this subsection:

(a) “Fee” means any board‑authorized fee that will be paid by more than 1/2 of all resident undergraduate students at least once during their enrollment at a public university, as described in the higher education institutional data inventory (HEIDI) user manual. A university increasing a fee that applies to a specific subset of students or courses shall provide sufficient information to prove that the increase applied to that subset will not cause the increase in the average amount of board‑authorized total tuition and fees paid by resident undergraduate students in the 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 academic year to exceed the limit established in this subsection.

(b) “Tuition and fee rate” means the average of full‑time rates paid by a majority of students in each undergraduate class, based on an unweighted average of the rates authorized by the university board and actually charged to students, deducting any uniformly rebated or refunded amounts, for the 2 semesters with the highest levels of full‑time equated resident undergraduate enrollment during the academic year, as described in the higher education institutional data inventory (HEIDI) user manual.

(c) For purposes of subdivision (a), for a public university that compels resident undergraduate students to be covered by health insurance as a condition to enroll at the university, “fee” includes the annual amount a student is charged for coverage by the university‑affiliated group health insurance policy if he or she does not provide proof that he or she is otherwise covered by health insurance. This subdivision does not apply to limited subsets of resident undergraduate students to be covered by health insurance for specific reasons other than general enrollment at the university.

(2) The state budget director shall implement uniform reporting requirements to ensure that a public university receiving a payment under section 265a for performance funding has satisfied the tuition restraint requirements of this section. The state budget director shall have the sole authority to determine if a public university has met the requirements of this section. Information reported by a public university to the state budget director under this subsection shall also be reported to the house and senate appropriations subcommittees on higher education and the house and senate fiscal agencies.

(3) Universities that exceed the tuition and fee rate cap described in subsection (1) shall not receive a planning or construction authorization for a state‑funded capital outlay project in fiscal year 2018‑2019 or 2019‑2020, fiscal year 2019‑2020.2020‑2021, OR FISCAL YEAR 2021‑2022.

(4) Notwithstanding any other provision of this act, the legislature may at any time adjust appropriations for a university that adopts an increase in tuition and fee rates for resident undergraduate students that exceeds the rate cap established in subsection (1).

Sec. 265a. (1) Appropriations to public universities in section 236 for fiscal year 2017‑2018 YEARS 2018‑2019, 2019‑2020, AND 2020‑2021 for performance funding shall be paid only to a public university that complies with section 265 and certifies to the state budget director, the house and senate appropriations subcommittees on higher education, and the house and senate fiscal agencies by August 31, 2017 2018 that it complies with all of the following requirements:

(a) The university participates in reverse transfer agreements described in section 286 with at least 3 Michigan community colleges.

(b) The university does not and will not consider whether dual enrollment credits earned by an incoming student were utilized towards his or her high school graduation requirements when making a determination as to whether those credits may be used by the student toward completion of a university degree or certificate program.

(c) The university actively participates in and submits timely updates to the Michigan Transfer Network created as part of the Michigan Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers transfer agreement.

(2) Any performance funding amounts under section 236 that are not paid to a public university because it did not comply with 1 or more requirements under subsection (1) are unappropriated and reappropriated for performance funding to those public universities that meet the requirements under subsection (1), distributed in proportion to their performance funding appropriation amounts under section 236.

(3) The state budget director shall report to the house and senate appropriations subcommittees on higher education and the house and senate fiscal agencies by September 30, 2017, 2018, regarding any performance funding amounts that are not paid to a public university because it did not comply with 1 or more requirements under subsection (1) and any reappropriation of funds under subsection (2).

(4) Performance funding amounts described in section 236 are distributed based on the following formula:

(a) Proportional to each university’s share of total operations funding appropriated in fiscal year 2010‑2011, 50%.

(b) Based on weighted undergraduate completions in critical skills areas, 11.1%.

(c) Based on research and development expenditures, for universities classified in Carnegie classifications as doctoral universities: moderate research activity, doctoral universities: higher research activity, or doctoral universities: highest research activity only, 5.6%.

(d) Based on 6‑year graduation rate, total degree completions, and institutional support as a percentage of core expenditures, and the percentage of students receiving Pell grants, scored against national Carnegie classification peers and weighted by total undergraduate fiscal year equated students, 33.3%.

(5) For purposes of determining the score of a university under subsection (4)(d), each university is assigned 1 of the following scores:

(a) A university classified as in the top 20%, a score of 3.

(b) A university classified as above national median, a score of 2.

(c) A university classified as improving, a score of 2. It is the intent of the legislature that, beginning in the 2018‑2019 2019‑2020 state fiscal year, a university classified as improving is assigned a score of 1.

(d) A university that is not included in subdivision (a), (b), or (c), a score of 0.

(6) As used in this section, “Carnegie classification” means the basic classification of the university according to the most recent version of the Carnegie classification of institutions of higher education, published by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

(7) It is the intent of the legislature to allocate more funding based on performance metrics in future years.

SEC. 265B. (1) APPROPRIATIONS TO PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES IN SECTION 236 FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2019 FOR OPERATIONS FUNDING SHALL BE REDUCED BY 10% PURSUANT TO THE PROCEDURES DESCRIBED IN SUBDIVISION (A) FOR A PUBLIC UNIVERSITY THAT FAILS TO SUBMIT CERTIFICATION TO THE STATE BUDGET DIRECTOR, THE HOUSE AND SENATE APPROPRIATIONS SUBCOMMITTEES ON HIGHER EDUCATION, AND THE HOUSE AND SENATE FISCAL AGENCIES BY AUGUST 31, 2018 THAT THE UNIVERSITY COMPLIES WITH SECTIONS 274C AND 274D AND THAT IT COMPLIES WITH ALL OF THE REQUIREMENTS DESCRIBED IN SUBDIVISIONS (B) TO (I), AS FOLLOWS:

(A) IF A UNIVERSITY FAILS TO SUBMIT CERTIFICATION, THE STATE BUDGET DIRECTOR SHALL WITHHOLD 10% OF THAT UNIVERSITY’S ANNUAL OPERATIONS FUNDING UNTIL THE UNIVERSITY SUBMITS CERTIFICATION. IF A UNIVERSITY FAILS TO SUBMIT CERTIFICATION BY THE END OF THE FISCAL YEAR, THE 10% OF ITS ANNUAL OPERATIONS FUNDING THAT IS WITHHELD SHALL LAPSE TO THE GENERAL FUND.

(B) FOR TITLE IX INVESTIGATIONS OF ALLEGED SEXUAL MISCONDUCT, THE UNIVERSITY PROHIBITS THE USE OF MEDICAL EXPERTS THAT HAVE AN ACTUAL OR APPARENT CONFLICT OF INTEREST.

(C) FOR TITLE IX INVESTIGATIONS OF ALLEGED SEXUAL MISCONDUCT, THE UNIVERSITY PROHIBITS THE ISSUANCE OF DIVERGENT REPORTS TO COMPLAINANTS, RESPONDENTS, AND ADMINISTRATION AND INSTEAD REQUIRES THAT IDENTICAL REPORTS BE ISSUED TO THEM.

(D) CONSISTENT WITH THE UNIVERSITY’S OBLIGATIONS UNDER 20 USC 1092(F), THE UNIVERSITY NOTIFIES EACH INDIVIDUAL WHO REPORTS HAVING EXPERIENCED SEXUAL ASSAULT BY A STUDENT, FACULTY MEMBER, OR STAFF MEMBER OF THE UNIVERSITY THAT THE INDIVIDUAL HAS THE OPTION TO REPORT THE MATTER TO LAW ENFORCEMENT, TO THE UNIVERSITY, TO BOTH, OR TO NEITHER, AS THE INDIVIDUAL MAY CHOOSE.

(E) THE UNIVERSITY PROVIDES BOTH OF THE FOLLOWING:

(i) FOR ALL FRESHMEN AND INCOMING TRANSFER STUDENTS ENROLLED, AN IN‑PERSON SEXUAL MISCONDUCT PREVENTION PRESENTATION OR COURSE, WHICH MUST INCLUDE CONTACT INFORMATION FOR THE TITLE IX OFFICE OF THE UNIVERSITY.

(ii) FOR ALL STUDENTS NOT CONSIDERED FRESHMEN OR INCOMING TRANSFER STUDENTS, AN ONLINE OR ELECTRONIC SEXUAL MISCONDUCT PREVENTION PRESENTATION OR COURSE.

(F) THE UNIVERSITY PROHIBITS SEEKING COMPENSATION FROM THE RECIPIENT OF ANY MEDICAL PROCEDURE, TREATMENT, OR CARE PROVIDED BY A MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL WHO HAS BEEN CONVICTED OF A FELONY ARISING OUT OF THE MEDICAL PROCEDURE, TREATMENT, OR CARE.

(G) THE UNIVERSITY HAS OR PLANS TO HAVE A THIRD PARTY REVIEW ITS TITLE IX COMPLIANCE OFFICE AND RELATED POLICIES AND PROCEDURES BY THE END OF THE 2018‑2019 ACADEMIC YEAR. A COPY OF THE THIRD‑PARTY REVIEW SHALL BE TRANSMITTED TO THE STATE BUDGET DIRECTOR, THE HOUSE AND SENATE APPROPRIATIONS SUBCOMMITTEES ON HIGHER EDUCATION, AND THE HOUSE AND SENATE FISCAL AGENCIES. AFTER THE THIRD‑PARTY REVIEW HAS BEEN CONDUCTED FOR THE 2018‑2019 ACADEMIC YEAR, THE UNIVERSITY SHALL HAVE A THIRD‑PARTY REVIEW ONCE EVERY THREE YEARS AND A COPY OF THE THIRD‑PARTY REVIEW SHALL BE TRANSMITTED TO THE STATE BUDGET DIRECTOR, THE HOUSE AND SENATE APPROPRIATIONS SUBCOMMITTEES ON HIGHER EDUCATION, AND THE HOUSE AND SENATE FISCAL AGENCIES.

(H) THE UNIVERSITY REQUIRES THAT THE GOVERNING BOARD AND THE PRESIDENT OR CHANCELLOR OF THE UNIVERSITY RECEIVE NOT LESS THAN QUARTERLY REPORTS FROM THEIR TITLE IX COORDINATOR OR TITLE IX OFFICE. THE REPORT SHALL CONTAIN AGGREGATED DATA OF THE NUMBER OF SEXUAL MISCONDUCT REPORTS THAT THE OFFICE RECEIVED FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR, THE TYPES OF REPORTS RECEIVED, INCLUDING REPORTS RECEIVED AGAINST EMPLOYEES, AND A SUMMARY OF THE GENERAL OUTCOMES OF THE REPORTS AND INVESTIGATIONS. A MEMBER OF THE GOVERNING BOARD MAY REQUEST TO REVIEW A TITLE IX INVESTIGATION REPORT INVOLVING A COMPLAINT AGAINST AN EMPLOYEE, AND THE UNIVERSITY SHALL PROVIDE THE REPORT IN A MANNER IT CONSIDERS APPROPRIATE. THE UNIVERSITY SHALL PROTECT THE COMPLAINANT’S ANONYMITY, AND THE REPORT SHALL NOT CONTAIN SPECIFIC IDENTIFYING INFORMATION.

(I) IF ALLEGATIONS AGAINST AN EMPLOYEE ARE MADE IN MORE THAN 1 TITLE IX COMPLAINT THAT RESULTED IN THE UNIVERSITY FINDING THAT NO MISCONDUCT OCCURRED, THE UNIVERSITY REQUIRES THAT THE TITLE IX OFFICER PROMPTLY NOTIFY THE PRESIDENT OR CHANCELLOR AND A MEMBER OF THE UNIVERSITY’S GOVERNING BOARD IN WRITING AND TAKE ALL APPROPRIATE STEPS TO ENSURE THAT THE MATTER IS BEING INVESTIGATED THOROUGHLY, INCLUDING HIRING AN OUTSIDE INVESTIGATOR FOR FUTURE CASES INVOLVING THAT EMPLOYEE. A THIRD‑PARTY TITLE IX INVESTIGATION UNDER THIS SUBDIVISION DOES NOT PROHIBIT THE UNIVERSITY FROM SIMULTANEOUSLY CONDUCTING ITS OWN TITLE IX INVESTIGATION THROUGH ITS OWN TITLE IX COORDINATOR.

(2) EACH PUBLIC UNIVERSITY THAT RECEIVES AN APPROPRIATION IN SECTION 236 SHALL ALSO CERTIFY THAT ITS PRESIDENT OR CHANCELLOR AND A MEMBER OF ITS GOVERNING BOARD HAS REVIEWED ALL TITLE IX REPORTS INVOLVING THE ALLEGED SEXUAL MISCONDUCT OF AN EMPLOYEE OF THE UNIVERSITY, AND SHALL SEND THE CERTIFICATION TO THE HOUSE AND SENATE APPROPRIATIONS SUBCOMMITTEES ON HIGHER EDUCATION, THE HOUSE AND SENATE FISCAL AGENCIES, AND THE STATE BUDGET DIRECTOR BY AUGUST 31, 2018.

(3) FOR PURPOSES OF THIS SECTION, “SEXUAL MISCONDUCT” INCLUDES, BUT IS NOT LIMITED TO, ANY OF THE FOLLOWING:

(A) INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE.

(B) NONCONSENSUAL SEXUAL CONDUCT.

(C) SEXUAL ASSAULT.

(D) SEXUAL EXPLOITATION.

(E) SEXUAL HARASSMENT.

(F) STALKING.

SEC. 265C. BY FEBRUARY 1, 2019, THE MICHIGAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE ASSOCIATION, THE MICHIGAN ASSOCIATION OF STATE UNIVERSITIES, AND THE MICHIGAN INDEPENDENT COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES, ON BEHALF OF THEIR MEMBER COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES, SHALL SUBMIT TO THE SENATE AND HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS SUBCOMMITTEES ON HIGHER EDUCATION, THE SENATE AND HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS SUBCOMMITTEES ON COMMUNITY COLLEGES, THE SENATE AND HOUSE FISCAL AGENCIES, AND THE STATE BUDGET DIRECTOR A COMPREHENSIVE REPORT DETAILING THE NUMBER OF ACADEMIC PROGRAM PARTNERSHIPS BETWEEN PUBLIC COMMUNITY COLLEGES, PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES, AND PRIVATE COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION:

(A) THE NAMES OF THE BACCALAUREATE DEGREE PROGRAMS OF STUDY OFFERED BY PUBLIC AND PRIVATE UNIVERSITIES ON COMMUNITY COLLEGE CAMPUSES.

(B) THE NAMES OF THE ARTICULATION AGREEMENTS FOR BACCALAUREATE DEGREE PROGRAMS OF STUDY BETWEEN PUBLIC COMMUNITY COLLEGES, PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES, AND PRIVATE COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES.

(C) THE NUMBER OF STUDENTS ENROLLED AND NUMBER OF DEGREES AWARDED THROUGH ARTICULATION AGREEMENTS, AND THE NUMBER OF COURSES OFFERED, NUMBER OF STUDENTS ENROLLED, AND NUMBER OF DEGREES AWARDED THROUGH ON‑CAMPUS PROGRAMS NAMED IN SUBDIVISION (A) FROM JULY 1, 2017 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2018.

SEC. 265D. THE LEGISLATURE ENCOURAGES EACH PUBLIC UNIVERSITY THAT RECEIVES AN APPROPRIATION IN SECTION 236 TO ENTER INTO A MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING WITH AT LEAST 1 LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCY WITH JURISDICTION ON OR AROUND CAMPUS FOR THE COMMUNICATION AND COORDINATION OF RESPONSES TO INCIDENTS OF SEXUAL ASSAULT.

SEC. 265E. IT IS THE INTENT OF THE LEGISLATURE THAT PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES USE A PORTION OF FUNDS RECEIVED IN SECTION 236 FOR CAMPUS SAFETY PROGRAMS, SEXUAL ASSAULT PREVENTION PROGRAMS, AND STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH PROGRAMS.

Sec. 267. All public universities shall submit the amount of tuition and fees actually charged to a full‑time resident undergraduate student for academic year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 as part of their higher education institutional data inventory (HEIDI) data by August 31 of each year. A public university shall report any revisions for any semester of the reported academic year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 tuition and fee charges to HEIDI within 15 days of being adopted.

Sec. 268. (1) For the fiscal year ending September 30, 2018, 2019, it is the intent of the legislature that funds be allocated for unfunded North American Indian tuition waiver costs incurred by public universities under 1976 PA 174, MCL 390.1251 to 390.1253, from the general fund.

(2) Appropriations in section 236(7)(f) for North American Indian tuition waivers shall be paid to universities under section 2a of 1976 PA 174, MCL 390.1252a. Allocations shall be adjusted for amounts included in university operations appropriations. If funds are insufficient to support the entire cost of waivers, amounts shall be prorated proportionate to each institution’s shortfall as a percentage of its fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 state appropriation for operations.

(3) By February 15 of each year, the department of civil rights shall annually submit to the state budget director, the house and senate appropriations subcommittees on higher education, and the house and senate fiscal agencies a report on North American Indian tuition waivers for the preceding academic year that includes, but is not limited to, all of the following information:

(a) The number of waiver applications received and the number of waiver applications approved.

(b) For each university submitting information under subsection (4), all of the following:

(i) The number of graduate and undergraduate North American Indian students enrolled each term for the previous academic year.

(ii) The number of North American Indian waivers granted each term, including to continuing education students, and the monetary value of the waivers for the previous academic year.

(iii) The number of graduate and undergraduate students attending under a North American Indian tuition waiver who withdrew from the university each term during the previous academic year. For purposes of this subparagraph, a withdrawal occurs when a student who has been awarded the waiver withdraws from the institution at any point during the term, regardless of enrollment in subsequent terms.

(iv) The number of graduate and undergraduate students attending under a North American Indian tuition waiver who successfully complete a degree or certificate program, separated by degree or certificate level, and the graduation rate for graduate and undergraduate students attending under a North American Indian tuition waiver who complete a degree or certificate within 150% of the normal time to complete, separated by the level of the degree or certificate.

(4) A public university that receives funds under section 236 shall provide to the department of civil rights any information necessary for preparing the report detailed in subsection (3), using guidelines and procedures developed by the department of civil rights.

(5) The department of civil rights may consolidate the report required under this section with the report required under section 223, but a consolidated report must separately identify data for universities and data for community colleges.

Sec. 269. For fiscal year 2017‑2018, 2018‑2019, from the amount appropriated in section 236 to Central Michigan University for operations, $29,700.00 shall be paid to Saginaw Chippewa Tribal College for the costs of waiving tuition for North American Indians under 1976 PA 174, MCL 390.1251 to 390.1253.

Sec. 270. For fiscal year 2017‑2018, 2018‑2019, from the amount appropriated in section 236 to Lake Superior State University for operations, $100,000.00 shall be paid to Bay Mills Community College for the costs of waiving tuition for North American Indians under 1976 PA 174, MCL 390.1251 to 390.1253.

Sec. 274. It is the intent of the legislature that public and private organizations that conduct human embryonic stem cell derivation subject to section 27 of article I of the state constitution of 1963 will provide information to the director of the department of health and human services by December 1, 2017 2018 that includes all of the following:

(a) Documentation that the organization conducting human embryonic stem cell derivation is conducting its activities in compliance with the requirements of section 27 of article I of the state constitution of 1963 and all relevant National Institutes of Health guidelines pertaining to embryonic stem cell derivation.

(b) A list of all human embryonic stem cell lines submitted by the organization to the National Institutes of Health for inclusion in the Human Embryonic Stem Cell Registry before and during fiscal year 2016‑2017, 2017‑2018, and the status of each submission as approved, pending approval, or review completed but not yet accepted.

(c) Number of human embryonic stem cell lines derived and not submitted for inclusion in the Human Embryonic Stem Cell Registry, before and during fiscal year 2016‑2017.2017‑2018.

Sec. 274c. By February 1, 2018, 2019, each university receiving funds under section 236 shall report to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on higher education, the senate and house fiscal agencies, and the state budget director on its efforts to develop and implement sexual assault response training for the university’s title IX coordinator, campus law enforcement personnel, campus public safety personnel, and any other campus personnel charged with responding to on‑campus incidents, including information on sexual assault response training materials and the status of implementing sexual assault response training for campus personnel.

Sec. 274d. (1) By October 31, each university receiving funds under section 236 shall report to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on higher education, the senate and house fiscal agencies, and the state budget director, AND THE ATTORNEY GENERAL its annual title IX report, also known as the student sexual misconduct report, issued by the title IX coordinator, as required under the federal campus save act of 2013, Public Law 113‑4, section 304, 127 , Stat 54, 89‑92 (2013).

(2) FOR PURPOSES OF THE REPORT REQUIRED UNDER SUBSECTION (1), EACH UNIVERSITY SHALL INCLUDE A TITLE IX SUMMARY REPORT THAT INCLUDES ALL OF THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION:

(A) THE AMOUNTS AND DESCRIPTIONS OF ALL FEES INCURRED IN TITLE IX‑RELATED CIVIL AND CRIMINAL LITIGATION.

(B) THE NUMBER OF TITLE IX COMPLAINTS.

(C) THE AVERAGE LENGTH OF TIME FOR INVESTIGATION AND RESOLUTION OF TITLE IX COMPLAINTS.

(D) THE AGGREGATE NUMBER OF TITLE IX CASES, INVESTIGATIONS, AND COMPLAINTS FOR EACH OF THE CATEGORIES DESCRIBED IN SUBPARAGRAPHS (i) TO (iii), SUBJECT TO SUBPARAGRAPH (iv), AS FOLLOWS:

(i) CASES INVESTIGATED FOR LESS THAN 15 DAYS.

(ii) CASES INVESTIGATED FOR AT LEAST 30 DAYS AND LESS THAN 60 DAYS.

(iii) CASES INVESTIGATED FOR 90 DAYS OR MORE.

(iv) IF, FOR ANY CATEGORY OF CASES UNDER SUBPARAGRAPHS (i) TO (iii), THERE IS AN AGGREGATE OF FEWER THAN 5 CASES INVESTIGATED, THE UNIVERSITY SHALL NOT REPORT THE AGGREGATE NUMBER OF CASES AND INSTEAD SHALL REPORT THAT FEWER THAN 5 CASES WERE INVESTIGATED.

(E) THE NUMBER OF TITLE IX APPEALS AND THE RESOLUTIONS OF THOSE APPEALS.

(F) THE NUMBER OF TITLE IX‑RELATED COMPLAINTS FILED BY THE UNIVERSITY WITH LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES.

Sec. 275b. (1) Each public university receiving funds under section 236 shall ensure that the public university does all of the following in its admission application process if it knows that an applicant for admission is currently serving, or has ever served, as a member of the military, the national guard, NATIONAL GUARD, or the military reserves:

(a) Inform the applicant that he or she may receive academic credit for college‑level training and education he or she received while serving in the military.

(b) Inform the applicant that he or she may submit a transcript of his or her college‑level military training and education to the public university.

(c) If the applicant submits a transcript described in subdivision (b), evaluate that transcript and notify the applicant of what transfer credits are available to the applicant from the public university for his or her college‑level military training and education.

(2) As used in this section, “transcript” includes a joint services transcript prepared for the applicant under the American council on education registry of credit recommendations.

Sec. 276. (1) Included in the appropriation for fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for each public university in section 236 is funding for the Martin Luther King, Jr. ‑ Cesar Chavez ‑ Rosa Parks future faculty program that is intended to increase the pool of academically or economically disadvantaged candidates pursuing faculty teaching careers in postsecondary education. Preference may not be given to applicants on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, gender, or national origin. Institutions should encourage applications from applicants who would otherwise not adequately be represented in the graduate student and faculty populations. Each public university shall apply the percentage change applicable to every public university in the calculation of appropriations in section 236 to the amount of funds allocated to the future faculty program.

(2) The program shall be administered by each public university in a manner prescribed by the workforce development agency. The workforce development agency shall use a good faith effort standard to evaluate whether a fellowship is in default.

Sec. 277. (1) Included in the appropriation for fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for each public university in section 236 is funding for the Martin Luther King, Jr. ‑ Cesar Chavez ‑ Rosa Parks college day program that is intended to introduce academically or economically disadvantaged schoolchildren to the potential of a college education. Preference may not be given to participants on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, gender, or national origin. Public universities should encourage participation from those who would otherwise not adequately be represented in the student population.

(2) Individual program plans of each public university shall include a budget of equal contributions from this program, the participating public university, the participating school district, and the participating independent degree‑granting college. College day funds shall not be expended to cover indirect costs. Not more than 20% of the university match shall be attributable to indirect costs. Each public university shall apply the percentage change applicable to every public university in the calculation of appropriations in section 236 to the amount of funds allocated to the college day program.

(3) The program described in this section shall be administered by each public university in a manner prescribed by the workforce development agency.

Sec. 278. (1) Included in section 236 for fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 is funding for the Martin Luther King, Jr. ‑ Cesar Chavez ‑ Rosa Parks select student support services program for developing academically or economically disadvantaged student retention programs for 4‑year public and independent educational institutions in this state. Preference may not be given to participants on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, gender, or national origin. Institutions should encourage participation from those who would otherwise not adequately be represented in the student population.

(2) An award made under this program to any 1 institution shall not be greater than $150,000.00, and the amount awarded shall be matched on a 70% state, 30% college or university basis.

(3) The program described in this section shall be administered by the workforce development agency.

Sec. 279. (1) Included in section 236 for fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 is funding for the Martin Luther King, Jr. ‑ Cesar Chavez ‑ Rosa Parks college/university partnership program between 4‑year public and independent colleges and universities and public community colleges, which is intended to increase the number of academically or economically disadvantaged students who transfer from community colleges into baccalaureate programs. Preference may not be given to participants on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, gender, or national origin. Institutions should encourage participation from those who would otherwise not adequately be represented in the transfer student population.

(2) The grants shall be made under the program described in this section to Michigan public and independent colleges and universities. An award to any 1 institution shall not be greater than $150,000.00, and the amount awarded shall be matched on a 70% state, 30% college or university basis.

(3) The program described in this section shall be administered by the workforce development agency.

Sec. 280. (1) Included in the appropriation for fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 for each public university in section 236 is funding for the Martin Luther King, Jr. ‑ Cesar Chavez ‑ Rosa Parks visiting professors program which is intended to increase the number of instructors in the classroom to provide role models for academically or economically disadvantaged students. Preference may not be given to participants on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, gender, or national origin. Public universities should encourage participation from those who would otherwise not adequately be represented in the student population.

(2) The program described in this section shall be administered by the workforce development agency.

Sec. 281. (1) Included in the appropriation for fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 in section 236 is funding under the Martin Luther King, Jr. ‑ Cesar Chavez ‑ Rosa Parks initiative for the Morris Hood, Jr. educator development program which is intended to increase the number of academically or economically disadvantaged students who enroll in and complete K‑12 teacher education programs at the baccalaureate level. Preference may not be given to participants on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, gender, or national origin. Institutions should encourage participation from those who would otherwise not adequately be represented in the teacher education student population.

(2) The program described in this section shall be administered by each state‑approved teacher education institution in a manner prescribed by the workforce development agency.

(3) Approved teacher education institutions may and are encouraged to use student support services funding in coordination with the Morris Hood, Jr. funding to achieve the goals of the program described in this section.

Sec. 282. Each institution receiving funds for fiscal year 2017‑2018 2018‑2019 under section 278, 279, or 281 shall provide to the workforce development agency by April 15, 2018 2019 the unobligated and unexpended funds as of March 31, 2018 2019 and a plan to expend the remaining funds by the end of the fiscal year. Notwithstanding the award limitations in sections 278 and 279, the amount of funding reported as not being expended will be reallocated to the institutions that intend to expend all funding received under section 278, 279, or 281.

Sec. 289. (1) The NOT LESS THAN EVERY 4 YEARS, THE auditor general shall periodically audit higher education institutional data inventory (HEIDI) data submitted by all public universities under section 241 and may perform audits of selected public universities if determined necessary. The audits shall be based upon the definitions, requirements, and uniform reporting categories established by the state budget director in consultation with the HEIDI advisory committee. The auditor general shall submit a report of findings to the house and senate appropriations committees and the state budget director no later than July 1 of each year an audit takes place.

(2) Student credit hours reports shall not include the following:

(a) Student credit hours generated through instructional activity by faculty or staff in classrooms located outside Michigan, with the exception of instructional activity related to study‑abroad programs or field programs.

(b) Student credit hours generated through distance learning instruction for students not eligible for the public university’s in‑state main campus resident tuition rate. However, in instances where a student is enrolled in distance education and non‑distance education credit hours in a given term and the student’s non‑distance education enrollment is at a campus or site located within Michigan, student credit hours per the student’s eligibility for in‑state or out‑of‑state tuition rates may be reported.

(c) Student credit hours generated through credit by examination.

(d) Student credit hours generated through inmate prison programs regardless of teaching location.

(e) Student credit hours generated in new degree programs created on or after January 1, 1975 and before January 1, 2013, that were not specifically authorized for funding by the legislature, except spin‑off programs converted from existing core programs, and student credit hours generated in any new degree programs created after January 1, 2013, that are specifically excluded from reporting by the legislature under this section.

(3) “Distance learning instruction” as used in subsection (2) means instruction that occurs solely in other than a traditional classroom setting where the student and instructor are in the same physical location and for which a student receives course credits and is charged tuition and fees. Examples of distance learning instruction are instruction delivered solely through the internet, cable television, teleconference, or mail.

Enacting section 1. (1) In accordance with section 30 of article IX of the state constitution of 1963, total state spending from state sources on state school aid under article I of the state school aid act of 1979, 1979 PA 94, MCL 388.1601 to 388.1772, as amended by 2017 PA 143 and this amendatory act for fiscal year 2017‑2018 is estimated at $12,855,727,300.00 and state appropriations for school aid to be paid to local units of government for fiscal year 2017‑2018 are estimated at $12,668,569,700.00. In accordance with section 30 of article IX of the state constitution of 1963, total state spending on school aid under article I of the state school aid act of 1979, 1979 PA 94, MCL 388.1601 to 388.1772, as amended by this amendatory act from state sources for fiscal year 2018‑2019 is estimated at $13,040,725,300.00 and state appropriations for school aid to be paid to local units of government for fiscal year 2018‑2019 are estimated at $12,847,081,000.00.

(2) In accordance with section 30 of article IX of the state constitution of 1963, total state spending from state sources for community colleges for fiscal year 2018‑2019 under article II of the state school aid act of 1979, 1979 PA 94, MCL 388.1801 to 388.1830, is estimated at $408,215,500.00 and the amount of that state spending from state sources to be paid to local units of government for fiscal year 2018‑2019 is estimated at $408,215,500.00.

(3) In accordance with section 30 of article IX of the state constitution of 1963, total state spending from state sources for higher education for fiscal year 2018‑2019 under article III of the state school aid act of 1979, 1979 PA 94, MCL 388.1836 to 388.1891, is estimated at $1,546,206,200.00 and the amount of that state spending from state sources to be paid to local units of government for fiscal year 2018‑2019 is estimated at $0.00.

Enacting section 2. Sections 21j, 22g, 35, 61e, 67a, 99k, 99r, 104e, and 236f of the state school aid act of 1979, 1979 PA 94, MCL 388.1621j, 388.1622g, 388.1635, 388.1667a, 388.1699k, 388.1699r, 388.1704e, and 388.1836f, are repealed effective October 1, 2018.

Enacting section 3. (1) Except as otherwise provided in subsection (2), this amendatory act takes effect October 1, 2018.

(2) Sections 11, 11m, 17c, 21f, 22a, 22b, 22g, 24, 25f, 26a, 26c, 31d, 31m, 51a, 51c, 56, 61b, 61e, 62, 94, 99h, 104, 104e, 152b, 167b, and 236f of the state school aid act of 1979, 1979 PA 94, MCL 388.1611, 388.1611m, 388.1617c, 388.1621f, 388.1622a, 388.1622b, 388.1622g, 388.1624, 388.1625f, 388.1626a, 388.1626c, 388.1631d, 388.1631m, 388.1651a, 388.1651c, 388.1656, 388.1661b, 388.1661e, 388.1662, 388.1694, 388.1699h, 388.1704, 388.1704e, 388.1752b, 388.1767b, and 388.1836f, as amended by this amendatory act, take effect upon enactment of this amendatory act.

Third: That the House and Senate agree to the title of the bill to read as follows:

A bill to amend 1979 PA 94, entitled “An act to make appropriations to aid in the support of the public schools, the intermediate school districts, community colleges, and public universities of the state; to make appropriations for certain other purposes relating to education; to provide for the disbursement of the appropriations; to authorize the issuance of certain bonds and provide for the security of those bonds; to prescribe the powers and duties of certain state departments, the state board of education, and certain other boards and officials; to create certain funds and provide for their expenditure; to prescribe penalties; and to repeal acts and parts of acts” by amending sections 6, 11, 11a, 11j, 11k, 11m, 11s, 15, 18, 19, 20, 20d, 20f, 21f, 21h, 22a, 22b, 22d, 22g, 22m, 22n, 24, 24a, 24c, 25e, 25f, 25g, 26a, 26b, 26c, 31a, 31b, 31d, 31f, 31j, 32d, 32p, 32q, 35a, 39, 39a, 41, 51a, 51c, 51d, 53a, 54, 54b, 55, 56, 61a, 61b, 61c, 62, 64b, 64d, 65, 67, 74, 81, 94, 94a, 95b, 98, 99h, 99s, 99t, 99u, 102d, 104, 104b, 104c, 104d, 104e, 107, 147, 147a, 147b, 147c, 147e, 152a, 152b, 163, 164h, 166b, 169a, 201, 201a, 206, 207a, 207b, 207c, 209, 210b, 217, 225, 226, 229, 229a, 230, 236, 236a, 236b, 236c, 241, 245, 251, 252, 256, 263, 264, 265, 265a, 267, 268, 269, 270, 274, 274c, 274d, 275b, 276, 277, 278, 279, 280, 281, 282, and 289 (MCL 388.1606, 388.1611, 388.1611a, 388.1611j, 388.1611k, 388.1611m, 388.1611s, 388.1615, 388.1618, 388.1619, 388.1620, 388.1620d, 388.1620f, 388.1621f, 388.1621h, 388.1622a, 388.1622b, 388.1622d, 388.1622g, 388.1622m, 388.1622n, 388.1624, 388.1624a, 388.1624c, 388.1625e, 388.1625f, 388.1625g, 388.1626a, 388.1626b, 388.1626c, 388.1631a, 388.1631b, 388.1631d, 388.1631f, 388.1631j, 388.1632d, 388.1632p, 388.1632q, 388.1635a, 388.1639, 388.1639a, 388.1641, 388.1651a, 388.1651c, 388.1651d, 388.1653a, 388.1654, 388.1654b, 388.1655, 388.1656, 388.1661a, 388.1661b, 388.1661c, 388.1662, 388.1664b, 388.1664d, 388.1665, 388.1667, 388.1674, 388.1681, 388.1694, 388.1694a, 388.1695b, 388.1698, 388.1699h, 388.1699s, 388.1699t, 388.1699u, 388.1702d, 388.1704, 388.1704b, 388.1704c, 388.1704d, 388.1704e, 388.1707, 388.1747, 388.1747a, 388.1747b, 388.1747c, 388.1747e, 388.1752a, 388.1752b, 388.1763, 388.1764h, 388.1766b, 388.1769a, 388.1801, 388.1801a, 388.1806, 388.1807a, 388.1807b, 388.1807c, 388.1809, 388.1810b, 388.1817, 388.1825, 388.1826, 388.1829, 388.1829a, 388.1830, 388.1836, 388.1836a, 388.1836b, 388.1836c, 388.1841, 388.1845, 388.1851, 388.1852, 388.1856, 388.1863, 388.1864, 388.1865, 388.1865a, 388.1867, 388.1868, 388.1869, 388.1870, 388.1874, 388.1874c, 388.1874d, 388.1875b, 388.1876, 388.1877, 388.1878, 388.1879, 388.1880, 388.1881, 388.1882, and 388.1889), sections 6, 11a, 11j, 11k, 11m, 11s, 15, 18, 20, 20d, 20f, 22a, 22b, 22d, 22g, 24, 24a, 24c, 25f, 25g, 26a, 26b, 26c, 31b, 31d, 31f, 32p, 32q, 39, 39a, 41, 51a, 51c, 51d, 53a, 54, 54b, 55, 56, 61a, 61b, 62, 64b, 65, 67, 74, 81, 94, 94a, 98, 99s, 104, 104d, 147, 147b, 147c, 152a, 152b, 201, 201a, 206, 207a, 207b, 207c, 209, 210b, 217, 225, 226, 229, 229a, 230, 236, 236a, 236b, 236c, 241, 245, 251, 252, 256, 263, 264, 265, 265a, 267, 268, 269, 270, 274, 274c, 276, 277, 278, 279, 280, 281, and 282, as amended and sections 21h, 22m, 22n, 147e, 164h, and 274d as added by 2017 PA 108, sections 11, 21f, 25e, 31a, 31j, 32d, 35a, 61c, 64d, 95b, 99h, 99t, 102d, 104c, 107, 147a, and 166b as amended and sections 99u and 104e as added by 2017 PA 143, section 19 as amended by 2016 PA 533, section 104b as amended by 2016 PA 249, section 163 as amended by 2015 PA 85, section 169a as amended by 1997 PA 93, section 275b as added by 2015 PA 44, and section 289 as amended by 2013 PA 60, and by adding sections 17c, 22p, 25h, 31m, 35b, 54d, 61d, 61e, 99v, 167b, 209a, 210f, 215, 236f, 245a, 265b, 265c, 265d, and 265e; and to repeal acts and parts of acts.

Tim Kelly

Laura Cox

Conferees for the House

Dave Hildenbrand

Arlan B. Meekhof

Conferees for the Senate

The question being on the adoption of the conference report,

The conference report was then adopted, a majority of the members serving voting therefor, by yeas and nays, as follows:

Roll Call No. 483 Yeas—63

Afendoulis Frederick Kelly Roberts

Albert Garcia Kesto Runestad

Alexander Glenn LaFave Sheppard

Allor Graves LaSata Sneller

Bellino Greimel Lauwers Tedder

Bizon Griffin Leonard Theis

Brann Hauck Leutheuser VanderWall

Brinks Hernandez Lilly VanSingel

Calley Hoitenga Lower Vaupel

Camilleri Hornberger Lucido VerHeulen

Canfield Howell Marino Victory

Chatfield Howrylak Maturen Webber

Cole Hughes McCready Wentworth

Cox Iden Miller Whiteford

Crawford Inman Noble Yaroch

Farrington Kahle Rendon

Nays—46

Barrett Garrett LaGrand Reilly

Byrd Gay-Dagnogo Lasinski Robinson

Cambensy Geiss Liberati Sabo

Chang Green Love Santana

Chirkun Greig Moss Scott

Clemente Guerra Neeley Singh

Cochran Hammoud Pagan Sowerby

Dianda Hertel Pagel Wittenberg

Durhal Hoadley Peterson Yancey

Elder Johnson Phelps Yanez

Ellison Jones Rabhi Zemke

Faris Kosowski

In The Chair: Glenn

______

Rep. Phelps, having reserved the right to explain his nay vote, made the following statement:

“Mr. Speaker and members of the House:

Rep. Phelps No Vote Explanation for HB 5579

House Bill 5579 provides an increase in funding for each school district in our state and for that reason I can see why a slim majority of my colleagues will vote in favor of its passage. However, many of Michigan’s public schools find themselves in dire situations where their funding is stretched so thin that they don’t have the resources to educate and protect their students. A recent study showed that we need to increase the funding to our local schools by as much as $2000 per pupil. This bill only increases the per pupil funding amount by $120 for many schools, and no school received the needed $2000 increase. This bill also funds cyber schools at the same rate as traditional schools even though they don’t have anywhere near the same expenses. This is not acceptable while schools in cities like Flint and Saginaw struggle to keep the classrooms warm in the winter. Schools in our cities are struggling and my colleagues here in Lansing are avoiding their pleas for help at every turn. Instead of addressing their troubles in a way that ensures that these communities have good public schools available for every child to attend, free of charge, they have slipped a piece of boilerplate into this bill that would seek to close schools in cities like Flint and Saginaw. Closing schools in communities like this takes away opportunities for our young people and could very well limit their educational obtainment and economic potential. This budget again slaps these residents in the face by raiding nearly $1 Billion from the School Aid Fund when that money could have been used to address the needs of the schools sitting on this newly created chopping block. House Bill 5579 does not adequately address the values I promised my constituents I would protect and therefore I voted no.”

Senate Bill No. 848, entitled

A bill to make, supplement, adjust, and consolidate appropriations for various state departments and agencies, the judicial branch, and the legislative branch for the fiscal years ending September 30, 2019; to provide for certain conditions on appropriations; and to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations.

The Senate has adopted the report of the Committee of Conference and ordered that the bill be given immediate effect.

The Conference Report was read as follows:

First Conference Report

The Committee of Conference on the matters of difference between the two Houses concerning

Senate Bill No. 848, entitled

A bill to make, supplement, adjust, and consolidate appropriations for various state departments and agencies, the judicial branch, and the legislative branch for the fiscal years ending September 30, 2019; to provide for certain conditions on appropriations; and to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations.

Recommends:

First: That the House recede from the Substitute of the House as passed by the House.

Second: That the Senate and House agree to the Substitute of the Senate as passed by the Senate, amended to read as follows:

A bill to make, supplement, adjust, and consolidate appropriations for various state departments and agencies, capital outlay, the judicial branch, and the legislative branch for the fiscal years ending September 30, 2018 and September 30, 2019 and for other fiscal years; to provide for certain conditions on appropriations; to provide for the expenditure of the appropriations; and to repeal acts and parts of acts.

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF MICHIGAN ENACT:

ARTICLE I

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT

PART 1

LINE-ITEM APPROPRIATIONS

Sec. 101. There is appropriated for the department of agriculture and rural development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2019, from the following funds:

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT

APPROPRIATION SUMMARY

Full-time equated unclassified positions.............................................................................6.0

Full-time equated classified positions.............................................................................500.5

GROSS APPROPRIATION.......................................................................................................... $ 107,948,100

Interdepartmental grant revenues:

IDG from department of licensing and regulatory affairs, liquor quality testing fees................. 223,700

IDG from department of environmental quality, biosolids........................................................... 90,200

Total interdepartmental grants and intradepartmental transfers................................................... 313,900

ADJUSTED GROSS APPROPRIATION..................................................................................... $ 107,634,200

Federal revenues:

USDA, multiple grants................................................................................................................. 6,118,600

EPA, multiple grants..................................................................................................................... 1,277,300

HHS-FDA..................................................................................................................................... 4,140,500

Department of interior.................................................................................................................. 238,800

Total federal revenues................................................................................................................... 11,775,200

Special revenue funds:

Total local revenues...................................................................................................................... 0

Private - slow-the-spread foundation............................................................................................ 21,300

Private - commodity group revenue............................................................................................. 80,500

Total private revenues................................................................................................................... 101,800

Agricultural preservation fund...................................................................................................... 1,442,500

Agriculture equine industry development fund............................................................................ 3,667,200

Agriculture licensing and inspection fees.................................................................................... 4,110,200

Animal welfare fund..................................................................................................................... 150,000

Commodity inspection fees.......................................................................................................... 650,000

Consumer and industry food safety education fund..................................................................... 356,500

Dairy and food safety fund.......................................................................................................... 5,978,900

Feed control fund......................................................................................................................... 1,305,400

Fertilizer control fund.................................................................................................................. 1,095,600

Freshwater protection fund........................................................................................................... 7,940,700

Gasoline inspection and testing fund........................................................................................... 1,444,400

Grain dealers fee fund.................................................................................................................. 589,800

Horticulture fund.......................................................................................................................... 40,000

Industry support funds.................................................................................................................. 486,100

Michigan craft beverage council fund.......................................................................................... 917,200

Migratory labor housing fund...................................................................................................... 169,100

Private forestland enhancement fund............................................................................................ 581,500

Refined petroleum fund................................................................................................................ 3,316,800

Rural development fund............................................................................................................... 2,004,600

Testing fees................................................................................................................................... 200,000

Weights and measures regulation fees.......................................................................................... 725,500

Total other state restricted revenues............................................................................................. 37,172,000

State general fund/general purpose.............................................................................................. $ 58,585,200

State general fund/general purpose schedule:

Ongoing state general fund/general purpose.........................................................$55,430,200

One-time state general fund/general purpose.........................................................$3,155,000

Sec. 102. DEPARTMENTAL ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPORT

Full-time equated unclassified positions.............................................................................6.0

Full-time equated classified positions...............................................................................24.0

Unclassified salaries—6.0 FTE positions..................................................................................... $ 573,500

Accounting service center............................................................................................................ 1,164,200

Commissions and boards.............................................................................................................. 23,800

Emergency management—4.0 FTE positions............................................................................... 1,093,300

Executive direction—20.0 FTE positions..................................................................................... 2,561,900

Property management................................................................................................................... 705,700

GROSS APPROPRIATION.......................................................................................................... $ 6,122,400

Appropriated from:

Federal revenues:

HHS-FDA..................................................................................................................................... 438,100

Special revenue funds:

Agricultural preservation fund...................................................................................................... 16,600

Agriculture licensing and inspection fees.................................................................................... 127,500

Freshwater protection fund........................................................................................................... 24,500

Industry support funds.................................................................................................................. 54,300

Michigan craft beverage council fund.......................................................................................... 31,000

State general fund/general purpose.............................................................................................. $ 5,430,400

Sec. 103. INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY

Information technology services and projects.............................................................................. $ 1,794,500

GROSS APPROPRIATION.......................................................................................................... $ 1,794,500

Appropriated from:

Interdepartmental grant revenues:

IDG from department of licensing and regulatory affairs, liquor quality testing fees................. 3,200

Special revenue funds:

Agricultural preservation fund...................................................................................................... 200

Agriculture licensing and inspection fees.................................................................................... 93,800

Dairy and food safety fund.......................................................................................................... 61,200

Freshwater protection fund........................................................................................................... 100

Gasoline inspection testing fund.................................................................................................. 31,800

Michigan craft beverage council fund.......................................................................................... 500

State general fund/general purpose.............................................................................................. $ 1,603,700

Sec. 104. FOOD AND DAIRY

Full-time equated classified positions.............................................................................132.0

Food safety and quality assurance—96.0 FTE positions............................................................. $ 16,602,900

Milk safety and quality assurance—36.0 FTE positions.............................................................. 5,439,900

GROSS APPROPRIATION.......................................................................................................... $ 22,042,800

Appropriated from:

Federal revenues:

HHS-FDA..................................................................................................................................... 2,398,600

USDA, multiple grants................................................................................................................. 137,100

Special revenue funds:

Consumer and industry food safety education fund..................................................................... 356,500

Dairy and food safety fund.......................................................................................................... 5,421,500

State general fund/general purpose.............................................................................................. $ 13,729,100

Sec. 105. ANIMAL INDUSTRY

Full-time equated classified positions...............................................................................61.0

Animal disease prevention and response—61.0 FTE positions................................................... $ 9,356,900

Indemnification—livestock depredation....................................................................................... 50,000

GROSS APPROPRIATION.......................................................................................................... $ 9,406,900

Appropriated from:

Federal revenues:

Department of interior.................................................................................................................. 40,800

HHS-FDA..................................................................................................................................... 46,600

USDA, multiple grants................................................................................................................. 530,600

Special revenue funds:

Private - commodity group revenue............................................................................................. 30,500

Agriculture licensing and inspection fees.................................................................................... 70,300

Animal welfare fund..................................................................................................................... 150,000

State general fund/general purpose.............................................................................................. $ 8,538,100

Sec. 106. PESTICIDE AND PLANT PEST MANAGEMENT

Full-time equated classified positions...............................................................................93.0

Pesticide and plant pest management—87.0 FTE positions........................................................ $ 14,172,700

Producer security/grain dealers—6.0 FTE positions.................................................................... 628,200

GROSS APPROPRIATION.......................................................................................................... $ 14,800,900

Appropriated from:

Federal revenues:

Department of interior.................................................................................................................. 101,700

EPA, multiple grants..................................................................................................................... 543,000

HHS-FDA..................................................................................................................................... 325,300

USDA, multiple grants................................................................................................................. 716,900

Special revenue funds:

Private - slow-the-spread foundation............................................................................................ 21,300

Agriculture licensing and inspection fees.................................................................................... 3,481,900

Commodity inspection fees.......................................................................................................... 648,900

Feed control fund......................................................................................................................... 1,116,200

Fertilizer control fund.................................................................................................................. 1,071,600

Freshwater protection fund........................................................................................................... 156,200

Grain dealers fee fund.................................................................................................................. 581,800

Horticulture fund.......................................................................................................................... 40,000

Industry support funds.................................................................................................................. 251,400

State general fund/general purpose.............................................................................................. $ 5,744,700

Sec. 107. ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP

Full-time equated classified positions...............................................................................65.5

Environmental stewardship - MAEAP—25.0 FTE positions....................................................... $ 10,191,300

Farmland and open space preservation—10.0 FTE positions...................................................... 1,545,000

Intercounty drain—6.0 FTE positions.......................................................................................... 811,900

Migrant labor housing—9.0 FTE positions.................................................................................. 1,231,100

Qualified forest program—9.0 FTE positions.............................................................................. 2,590,000

Right-to-farm—6.5 FTE positions................................................................................................ 964,000

GROSS APPROPRIATION.......................................................................................................... $ 17,333,300

Appropriated from:

Interdepartmental grant revenues:

IDG from department of environmental quality, biosolids........................................................... 90,200

Federal revenues:

Department of interior.................................................................................................................. 96,300

EPA, multiple grants..................................................................................................................... 560,500

USDA, multiple grants................................................................................................................. 822,300

Special revenue funds:

Agricultural preservation fund...................................................................................................... 1,425,700

Freshwater protection fund........................................................................................................... 7,714,900

Migratory labor housing fund...................................................................................................... 140,100

Private forestland enhancement fund............................................................................................ 581,500

State general fund/general purpose.............................................................................................. $ 5,901,800

Sec. 108. LABORATORY SERVICES

Full-time equated classified positions.............................................................................108.0

Central licensing and customer service call center—12.0 FTE positions.................................... $ 1,338,200

Consumer protection program—41.0 FTE positions.................................................................... 6,790,600

Laboratory services—42.0 FTE positions.................................................................................... 7,141,500

USDA monitoring—13.0 FTE positions...................................................................................... 1,637,300

GROSS APPROPRIATION.......................................................................................................... $ 16,907,600

Appropriated from:

Interdepartmental grant revenues:

IDG from department of licensing and regulatory affairs, liquor quality testing fees................. 220,500

Federal revenues:

EPA, multiple grants..................................................................................................................... 173,800

HHS-FDA..................................................................................................................................... 931,900

USDA, multiple grants................................................................................................................. 1,638,500

Special revenue funds:

Agriculture licensing and inspection fees.................................................................................... 336,700

Commodity inspection fees.......................................................................................................... 1,100

Dairy and food safety fund.......................................................................................................... 496,200

Feed control fund......................................................................................................................... 189,200

Fertilizer control fund.................................................................................................................. 24,000

Freshwater protection fund........................................................................................................... 45,000

Gasoline inspection and testing fund........................................................................................... 1,412,600

Grain dealers fee fund.................................................................................................................. 8,000

Migratory labor housing fund...................................................................................................... 29,000

Refined petroleum fund................................................................................................................ 3,316,800

Testing fees................................................................................................................................... 200,000

Weights and measures regulation fees.......................................................................................... 725,500

State general fund/general purpose.............................................................................................. $ 7,158,800

Sec. 109. AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT

Full-time equated classified positions...............................................................................17.0

Agricultural development—13.0 FTE positions........................................................................... $ 4,253,100

Food and agriculture investment program.................................................................................... 5,125,000

Michigan craft beverage council—3.0 FTE positions.................................................................. 934,800

Rural development fund grant program—1.0 FTE position......................................................... 2,004,600

GROSS APPROPRIATION.......................................................................................................... $ 12,317,500

Appropriated from:

Federal revenues:

USDA, multiple grants................................................................................................................. 2,273,200

Special revenue funds:

Private - commodity group revenue............................................................................................. 50,000

Industry support funds.................................................................................................................. 180,400

Michigan craft beverage council fund.......................................................................................... 885,700

Rural development fund............................................................................................................... 2,004,600

State general fund/general purpose.............................................................................................. $ 6,923,600

Sec. 110. FAIRS AND EXPOSITIONS

County fairs, shows, and expositions grants................................................................................ $ 400,000

Fairs and racing............................................................................................................................ 256,600

Licensed tracks - light horse racing............................................................................................. 40,300

Light horse racing - breeders’ awards.......................................................................................... 20,000

Purses and supplements - fairs/licensed tracks............................................................................ 708,300

Standardbred breeders’ awards..................................................................................................... 345,900

Standardbred purses and supplements - licensed tracks............................................................... 671,800

Standardbred sire stakes............................................................................................................... 275,000

Thoroughbred breeders’ awards................................................................................................... 368,600

Thoroughbred sire stakes.............................................................................................................. 378,800

Thoroughbred supplements - licensed tracks............................................................................... 601,900

GROSS APPROPRIATION.......................................................................................................... $ 4,067,200

Appropriated from:

Special revenue funds:

Agriculture equine industry development fund............................................................................ 3,667,200

State general fund/general purpose.............................................................................................. $ 400,000

Sec. 111. ONE-TIME APPROPRIATIONS

Animal agriculture initiative......................................................................................................... $ 2,000,000

County fairs, shows, and expositions........................................................................................... 775,000

ACRE agriculture incubator......................................................................................................... 260,000

ODC network - project clarity..................................................................................................... 120,000

GROSS APPROPRIATION.......................................................................................................... $ 3,155,000

Appropriated from:

Special revenue funds:

State general fund/general purpose.............................................................................................. $ 3,155,000

PART 2

PROVISIONS CONCERNING APPROPRIATIONS

FOR FISCAL YEAR 2018-2019

GENERAL SECTIONS

Sec. 201. Pursuant to section 30 of article IX of the state constitution of 1963, total state spending from state sources under part 1 for fiscal year 2018-2019 is $95,757,200.00 and state spending from state sources to be paid to local units of government for fiscal year 2018-2019 is $6,350,000.00. The itemized statement below identifies appropriations from which spending to local units of government will occur:

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT

Environmental stewardship/MAEAP............................................................................................ $ 4,250,000

Qualified forest program.............................................................................................................. 1,500,000

Rural development fund grant program........................................................................................ 600,000

TOTAL.......................................................................................................................................... $ 6,350,000

Sec. 202. The appropriations authorized under part 1 and this part are subject to the management and budget act, 1984 PA 431, MCL 18.1101 to 18.1594.

Sec. 203. As used in part 1 and this part:

(a) “Department” means the department of agriculture and rural development.

(b) “Director” means the director of the department.

(c) “EPA” means the United States Environmental Protection Agency.

(d) “FDA” means the United States Food and Drug Administration.

(e) “Fiscal agencies” means the Michigan house fiscal agency and the Michigan senate fiscal agency.

(f) “FTE” means full-time equated.

(g) “HHS” means the United States Department of Health and Human Services.

(h) “IDG” means interdepartmental grant.

(i) “LARA” means the Michigan department of licensing and regulatory affairs.

(j) “LCC” means the Michigan liquor control commission.

(k) “MAEAP” means the Michigan agriculture environmental assurance program.

(l) “MDEQ” means the Michigan department of environmental quality.

(m) “MDNR” means the Michigan department of natural resources.

(n) “MOU” means memorandum of understanding.

(o) “Subcommittees” means all members of the subcommittees of the house and senate appropriations committees with jurisdiction over the budget for the department.

(p) “TB” means tuberculosis.

(q) “USDA” means the United States Department of Agriculture.

Sec. 204. The departments and agencies receiving appropriations in part 1 shall use the internet to fulfill the reporting requirements of this part. This requirement may include transmission of reports via electronic mail to the recipients identified for each reporting requirement, or it may include placement of reports on an internet or intranet site.

Sec. 205. Funds appropriated in part 1 shall not be used for the purchase of foreign goods or services, or both, if competitively priced and of comparable quality American goods or services, or both, are available. Preference shall be given to goods or services, or both, manufactured or provided by Michigan businesses, if they are competitively priced and of comparable quality. In addition, preference shall be given to goods or services, or both, that are manufactured or provided by Michigan businesses owned and operated by veterans, if they are competitively priced and of comparable quality.

Sec. 206. The director shall take all reasonable steps to ensure businesses in deprived and depressed communities compete for and perform contracts to provide services or supplies, or both. Each director shall strongly encourage firms with which the department contracts to subcontract with certified businesses in depressed and deprived communities for services or supplies, or both.

Sec. 207. The departments and agencies receiving appropriations in part 1 shall prepare a report on out-of-state travel expenses not later than January 1 of each year. The travel report shall be a listing of all travel by classified and unclassified employees outside this state in the immediately preceding fiscal year that was funded in whole or in part with funds appropriated in the department’s budget. The report shall be submitted to the house and senate appropriations committees, the house and senate fiscal agencies, and the state budget director. The report shall include the following information:

(a) The dates of each travel occurrence.

(b) The transportation and related costs of each travel occurrence, including the proportion funded with state general fund/general purpose revenues, the proportion funded with state restricted revenues, the proportion funded with federal revenues, and the proportion funded with other revenues.

Sec. 208. Funds appropriated in part 1 shall not be used by a principal executive department, state agency, or authority to hire a person to provide legal services that are the responsibility of the attorney general. This prohibition does not apply to legal services for bonding activities and for those outside services that the attorney general authorizes.

Sec. 209. Not later than November 30, the state budget office shall prepare and transmit a report that provides for estimates of the total general fund/general purpose appropriation lapses at the close of the prior fiscal year. This report shall summarize the projected year-end general fund/general purpose appropriation lapses by major departmental program or program areas. The report shall be transmitted to the chairpersons of the senate and house of representatives standing committees on appropriations and the senate and house fiscal agencies.

Sec. 210. (1) In addition to the funds appropriated in part 1, there is appropriated an amount not to exceed $5,000,000.00 for federal contingency funds. These funds are not available for expenditure until they have been transferred to another line item in part 1 under section 393(2) of the management and budget act, 1984 PA 431, MCL 18.1393.

(2) In addition to the funds appropriated in part 1, there is appropriated an amount not to exceed $6,000,000.00 for state restricted contingency funds. These funds are not available for expenditure until they have been transferred to another line item in part 1 under section 393(2) of the management and budget act, 1984 PA 431, MCL 18.1393.

(3) In addition to the funds appropriated in part 1, there is appropriated an amount not to exceed $100,000.00 for local contingency funds. These funds are not available for expenditure until they have been transferred to another line item in part 1 under section 393(2) of the management and budget act, 1984 PA 431, MCL 18.1393.

(4) In addition to the funds appropriated in part 1, there is appropriated an amount not to exceed $100,000.00 for private contingency funds. These funds are not available for expenditure until they have been transferred to another line item in part 1 under section 393(2) of the management and budget act, 1984 PA 431, MCL 18.1393.

Sec. 211. The department shall cooperate with the department of technology, management, and budget to maintain a searchable website accessible by the public at no cost that includes, but is not limited to, all of the following for each department or agency:

(a) Fiscal year-to-date expenditures by category.

(b) Fiscal year-to-date expenditures by appropriation unit.

(c) Fiscal year-to-date payments to a selected vendor, including the vendor name, payment date, payment amount, and payment description.

(d) The number of active department employees by job classification.

(e) Job specifications and wage rates.

Sec. 212. Within 14 days after the release of the executive budget recommendation, the department shall cooperate with the state budget office to provide the senate and house appropriations chairs, the subcommittees, respectively, and the senate and house fiscal agencies with an annual report on estimated state restricted fund balances, state restricted fund projected revenues, and state restricted fund expenditures for the fiscal years ending September 30, 2018 and September 30, 2019.

Sec. 213. The department shall maintain, on a publicly accessible website, a department scorecard that identifies, tracks, and regularly updates key metrics that are used to monitor and improve the agency’s performance.

Sec. 214. Total authorized appropriations from all sources under part 1 for legacy costs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2019 is $12,428,400.00. From this amount, total agency appropriations for pension-related legacy costs are estimated at $5,729,700.00. Total agency appropriations for retiree health care legacy costs are estimated at $6,698,700.00.

Sec. 215. The department shall not take disciplinary action against an employee for communicating with a member of the legislature or his or her staff.

Sec. 234. The department and agencies receiving appropriations in part 1 shall receive and retain copies of all reports funded from appropriations in part 1. Federal and state guidelines for short-term and long-term retention of records shall be followed. The department may electronically retain copies of reports unless otherwise required by federal and state guidelines.

DEPARTMENTAL ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPORT

Sec. 301. (1) The department may establish a fee schedule and collect fees for the following work activities and services:

(a) Pesticide and plant pest management propagation and certification of virus-free foundation stock.

(b) Fruit and vegetable inspection and grading services at shipping and termination points and processing plants.

(c) Laboratory support analyses of food, livestock, and agricultural products for disease, foreign products for disease, toxic materials, foreign substances, and quality standards.

(d) Laboratory support test samples for other state and local agencies and public or private organizations.

(2) The department may receive and expend revenue from the fees authorized under subsection (1), subject to appropriation, for the purpose of recovering expenses associated with the work activities and services described in subsection (1). Fee revenue collected by the department under subsection (1) shall not lapse to the state general fund at the end of the fiscal year but shall carry forward for appropriation by the legislature in the subsequent fiscal year.

(3) The department shall notify the subcommittees, the fiscal agencies, and the state budget office 30 days prior to proposing changes in fees authorized under this section or under section 5 of 1915 PA 91, MCL 285.35.

(4) On or before February 1 of each year, the department shall provide a report to the subcommittees, the fiscal agencies, and the state budget office detailing all the fees charged by the department under the authorization provided in this section, including, but not limited to, rates, number of individuals paying each fee, and the revenue generated by each fee in the previous fiscal year.

Sec. 302. (1) The department may contract with or provide grants to local units of government, institutions of higher education, or nonprofit organizations to support activities authorized by appropriations in part 1. As used in this section, contracts and grants include, but are not limited to, contracts for delivery of groundwater/freshwater programs, MAEAP technical assistance, forest management, invasive species monitoring, wildlife risk mitigation, grants promoting proper pesticide disposal, and research grants for the purpose of enhancing the agricultural industries in this state.

(2) The department shall provide notice of contracts or grants authorized under this section to the subcommittees, the fiscal agencies, and the state budget office not later than 7 days before the department notifies contract or grant recipients.

FOOD AND DAIRY

Sec. 401. (1) The department shall report on the previous fiscal year’s activities of the food and dairy division. The report shall include information on activities and outcomes of the dairy safety and inspection program, the food safety inspection program, the foodborne illness and emergency response program, and the food service program.

(2) The report shall include information on significant foodborne outbreaks and emergencies, including any significant enforcement actions taken related to food safety during the prior calendar year.

(3) The report shall be transmitted to the subcommittees, the fiscal agencies, and the state budget office and posted to the department’s website on or before April 1 of each year.

ANIMAL INDUSTRY

Sec. 451. From the funds appropriated in part 1 for bovine tuberculosis, the department shall pay for all whole herd testing costs and individual animal testing costs in the modified accredited zone to maintain split-state status requirements. These costs include indemnity and compensation for injury causing death or downer to animals.

Sec. 452. (1) The department shall report on the previous calendar year’s activities of the animal industry division. The report shall be transmitted to the subcommittees, the fiscal agencies, and the state budget office and posted to the department’s website on or before April 1 of each year.

(2) The department shall include in the report all indemnification payments for livestock depredation made in the previous calendar year and shall include all of the following:

(a) The reason for the indemnification.

(b) The amount of the indemnification.

(c) The person for whom the indemnification was paid.

Sec. 454. The department shall use its resources to collaborate with the USDA to monitor bovine TB, consistent with the May 2016 memorandum of understanding between the department and the USDA.

Sec. 457. (1) On or before October 15, 2018, the department shall provide to the subcommittees, the fiscal agencies, and the state budget office a report on bovine TB status and department activities.

(2) For each fiscal quarter following the report required in subsection (1), the department shall provide an update to the subcommittees, the fiscal agencies, and the state budget office. The quarterly update reports shall identify significant impacts to the program, including new incidence of bovine TB in this state, department activity associated with specific new incidence of bovine TB, any changes in USDA requirements or movement orders, and information and data on wildlife risk mitigation plan implementation in the modified accredited zone; implementation of a movement certificate process; progress toward annual surveillance test requirements; efforts to work with slaughter facilities in this state, as well as those that slaughter a significant number of animals from this state; educational programs and information for this state’s livestock community; and any other item the legislature should be aware of that will promote or hinder efforts to achieve bovine TB-free status for this state.

Sec. 459. It is the intent of the legislature that the department shall not conduct whole herd bovine TB testing on any 1 herd in a TB-free zone more often than every 4 years or re-test until all other herds in their county have been tested, unless involved in an epidemiological investigation, there is an outbreak within a 10-radius-mile area, or is not on a verified wildlife risk mitigated premises. If there is an outbreak within a 10-radius-mile area, protocols outlined by the current memorandum of understanding with the USDA shall be used.

Sec. 462. From the funds appropriated in part 1, not to exceed $20,000.00, the department shall establish a grant program to assist in the construction of protective systems for apiaries. The department may make grants under this program to reimburse apiary owners for costs of projects designed to protect apiaries from damage by wildlife, subject to all of the following:

(a) Grants may not exceed $250.00 per apiary site.

(b) Grants under this subsection may be made only for projects identified and approved by the department prior to the start of project activity.

PESTICIDE AND PLANT PEST MANAGEMENT

Sec. 501. The department shall report on the previous calendar year’s activities of the pesticide and plant pest management division. The report shall be transmitted to the subcommittees, the fiscal agencies, and the state budget office and posted to the department’s website on or before April 1 of each year.

ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP

Sec. 601. The funds appropriated in part 1 for environmental stewardship/MAEAP shall be used to support department agriculture pollution prevention programs, including groundwater and freshwater protection programs under part 87 of the Michigan natural resources and environmental protection act, 1994 PA 451, MCL 324.8701 to 324.8717, and technical assistance in implementing conservation grants available under the federal farm bill of 2014.

Sec. 602. The department shall report on the previous calendar year’s activities of the environmental stewardship division. The report shall be transmitted to the subcommittees, the fiscal agencies, and the state budget office and posted to the department’s website on or before April 1 of each year.

Sec. 604. The department may receive and expend federal revenues in excess of the federal revenue appropriated in section 107 of part 1 for environmental stewardship and MAEAP activities. The department shall notify the subcommittees, the fiscal agencies, and the state budget office prior to expending federal revenues authorized under this section.

Sec. 608. (1) The appropriations in part 1 for the qualified forest affidavit program are for the purpose of increasing the knowledge of nonindustrial private forestland owners of sound forest management practices and increasing the amount of commercial timber production from those lands.

(2) The department shall work in partnership with stakeholder groups and other state and federal agencies to increase the active management of nonindustrial private forestland to foster the growth of Michigan’s timber product industry.

LABORATORY PROGRAM

Sec. 651. The department shall report on the previous calendar year’s activities of the laboratory division. The report shall be transmitted to the subcommittees, the fiscal agencies, and the state budget office and posted to the department’s website on or before April 1 of each year.

AGRICULTURE DEVELOPMENT

Sec. 701. (1) From the funds appropriated in part 1 for the food and agriculture investment program, the department shall establish and administer a food and agriculture investment program.

(2) The food and agriculture investment program shall expand the Michigan food and agriculture sector, grow Michigan exports, promote the development of value-added agricultural production, food hubs, food incubators, and community-based processing facilities, and the expansion of farm markets and urban agriculture, and increase food processing activities within the state by accelerating projects and infrastructure development that support growth in the food and agriculture processing industry.

(3) In addition to the funds appropriated in part 1, the department may receive and expend funds received from outside sources for the food and agriculture investment program.

(4) Before the allocation of funding, all projects shall receive approval from the Michigan commission of agriculture and rural development, except for projects selected through a competitive process by a joint evaluation committee selected by the director and consisting of representatives that have agriculture, business, and economic development expertise. Projects funded through the food and agriculture investment program will be required to have a grant agreement that outlines milestones and activities that must be met in order to receive a disbursement of funds. Projects must also identify measurable project outcomes.

(5) The department shall include in the agriculture development annual report a report on the food and agriculture investment program for the previous fiscal year that includes a listing of the grantees, award amounts, match funding, project locations, and project outcomes.

(6) The food and agriculture investment program shall be administered by the department and provide support for food and agriculture projects that will enable growth in the industry and this state’s economy.

(7) The unexpended funds appropriated in part 1 for the food and agriculture investment program are designated as a work project appropriation, and any unencumbered or unallotted funds shall not lapse at the end of the fiscal year and shall be available for expenditures for projects under this section until the projects have been completed. The following is in compliance with section 451a(1) of the management and budget act, 1984 PA 431, MCL 18.1451a:

(a) The purpose of the project is to promote and expand the Michigan food and agriculture sector, grow Michigan exports, and increase food processing activities within the state.

(b) The project will be funded in accordance with this section and the project guidelines approved by the Michigan agriculture commission prior to an award.

(c) The estimated cost of this project is identified in the appropriation line item.

(d) The tentative completion date for the work project is September 30, 2021.

(8) The department may expend money from the funds appropriated in part 1 for the food and agriculture investment program, including all of the following activities:

(a) Grants.

(b) Loans or loan guarantees.

(c) Infrastructure development.

(d) Other economic assistance.

(e) Program administration.

(f) Export assistance.

(9) The department shall expend no more than 10% from the funds appropriated in part 1 for the food and agriculture investment program for administrative purposes.

Sec. 706. (1) The department shall report on the previous calendar year’s activities of the agriculture development division. The report shall be transmitted to the subcommittees, the fiscal agencies, and the state budget office and posted to the department’s website on or before April 1 of each year.

(2) The report shall include the following information on any grants awarded during the prior fiscal year:

(a) The name of the grantee.

(b) The amount of the grant.

(c) The purpose of the grant, including measurable outcomes.

(d) Additional state, federal, private, or local funds contributed to the grant project.

(e) The completion date of grant-funded activities.

(3) The report shall include the following information on the Michigan craft beverage council established under section 303 of the Michigan liquor control code of 1998, 1998 PA 58, MCL 436.1303:

(a) Council activities and accomplishments for the previous fiscal year.

(b) Council expenditures for the previous fiscal year by category of administration, industry support, research and education grants, and promotion and consumer education.

(c) Grants awarded during the previous fiscal year and the results of research grant projects completed during the previous fiscal year.

FAIRS AND EXPOSITIONS

Sec. 801. All appropriations from the agriculture equine industry development fund shall be spent on equine-related purposes. No funds from the agriculture equine industry development fund shall be expended for nonequine-related purposes without prior approval of the legislature.

Sec. 802. From the funds appropriated in part 1 from agriculture equine industry development funds, available revenue shall be allocated in the following priority order:

(a) To support all administrative, contractual, and regulatory costs incurred by the department and the Michigan gaming control board.

(b) Up to $395,000.00 shall be allocated to the purses and supplements - fairs/licensed tracks line item.

(c) Any remaining funds collected through September 30, 2019, after the obligations in subdivisions (a) and (b) have been met, shall be prorated equally among the supplements, breeders’ awards, and sire stakes awards to eligible race meeting licensees in accordance with section 20 of the horse racing law of 1995, 1995 PA 279, MCL 431.320.

Sec. 805. (1) The department shall establish and administer a county fairs, shows, and expositions grant program. The program shall have the following objectives:

(a) Assist in the promotion of building improvements or other capital improvements at county fairgrounds of the state.

(b) Provide financial support, promotion, prizes, and premiums of equine, livestock, and other agricultural commodity expositions in the state.

(2) The department shall award grants on a competitive basis to county fairs or other organizations from the funds appropriated in part 1 for county fairs, shows, and expositions grants. Grantees will be required to provide a dollar‑for‑dollar cash match with grant awards and identify measurable project outcomes. A county fair organization that received a county fair capital improvement grant in the prior fiscal year shall not receive a grant from the appropriation in part 1.

(3) From the amount appropriated in part 1 for county fairs, shows, and expositions, up to $25,000.00 shall be expended for the purpose of financial support, promotion, prizes, and premiums of equine, livestock, and other agricultural commodity expositions in this state, and festivals.

(4) All fairs receiving grants under this section shall provide a report to the department on the financial impact resulting from the capital improvement project on both fair and nonfair events. These reports are due for 3 years immediately following the completion of the capital improvement project.

(5) The department shall identify criteria, evaluate applications, and provide recommendations to the director for final approval of grant awards.

(6) The department may expend money from the funds appropriated in part 1 for the county fairs, shows, and expositions grants for administering the program.

(7) From the funds appropriated in part 1 for county fairs, shows, and expositions grants, $25,000.00 shall be used for renovations to the Tuscola County fair grandstand, and $250,000.00 shall be used for the construction and furnishing of a community center at the Tuscola County fair.

(8) The unexpended portion of the county fairs, shows, and expositions grants is considered a work project appropriation in accordance with section 451a of the management and budget act, 1984 PA 431, MCL 18.1451a. The following apply to the project:

(a) The purpose of the project is to support building improvements or other capital improvements at county fairgrounds of the state.

(b) All grants will be distributed in accordance with this section and the grant guidelines published prior to the request for proposals.

(c) The estimated cost of the project is identified in the appropriation line item.

(d) The tentative completion date for the work project is September 30, 2021.

(9) The department shall provide a year-end report on the county fairs, shows, and expositions grants no later than December 1, 2019 to the subcommittees, the fiscal agencies, and the state budget director that includes a listing of the grantees, award amounts, match funding, and project outcomes.

ARTICLE V

DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

PART 1

LINE-ITEM APPROPRIATIONS

Sec. 101. There is appropriated for the department of corrections for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2019, from the following funds:

DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

APPROPRIATION SUMMARY

Average population............................................................................................................38,815

Full-time equated unclassified positions...............................................................................16.0

Full-time equated classified positions............................................................................13,963.2

GROSS APPROPRIATION.......................................................................................................... $ 2,017,056,200

Interdepartmental grant revenues:

Total interdepartmental grants and intradepartmental transfers................................................... 0

ADJUSTED GROSS APPROPRIATION..................................................................................... $ 2,017,056,200

Federal revenues:

Total federal revenues................................................................................................................... 5,315,200

Special revenue funds:

Total local revenues...................................................................................................................... 8,960,100

Total private revenues................................................................................................................... 0

Total other state restricted revenues............................................................................................. 40,939,600

State general fund/general purpose.............................................................................................. $ 1,961,841,300

Sec. 102. DEPARTMENTAL ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPORT

Full-time equated unclassified positions...........................................................................16.0

Full-time equated classified positions.............................................................................322.0

Unclassified salaries—16.0 FTE positions................................................................................... $ 1,884,600

Administrative hearings officers................................................................................................... 3,266,100

Budget and operations administration—240.0 FTE positions...................................................... 32,971,300

Compensatory buyout and union leave bank................................................................................ 100

County jail reimbursement program............................................................................................. 15,064,600

Equipment and special maintenance............................................................................................ 1,559,700

Executive direction—20.0 FTE positions..................................................................................... 4,298,200

Judicial data warehouse user fees................................................................................................ 50,600

New custody staff training........................................................................................................... 9,527,600

Prison industries operations—62.0 FTE positions....................................................................... 9,989,700

Property management................................................................................................................... 2,413,100

Prosecutorial and detainer expenses............................................................................................. 4,901,000

Sheriffs’ coordinating and training office.................................................................................... 100,000

Worker’s compensation................................................................................................................. 10,613,000

GROSS APPROPRIATION.......................................................................................................... $ 96,639,600

Appropriated from:

Federal revenues:

DOJ, prison rape elimination act grant........................................................................................ 674,700

Special revenue funds:

Correctional industries revolving fund......................................................................................... 9,989,700

Correctional industries revolving fund 110.................................................................................. 616,700

Jail reimbursement program fund................................................................................................. 5,900,000

Local corrections officer training fund......................................................................................... 100,000

Program and special equipment fund........................................................................................... 100

State general fund/general purpose.............................................................................................. $ 79,358,400

Sec. 103. OFFENDER SUCCESS ADMINISTRATION

Full-time equated classified positions.............................................................................351.4

Community corrections comprehensive plans and services......................................................... $ 12,058,000

Education/skilled trades/career readiness programs—270.4 FTE positions................................. 39,009,700

Enhanced food technology program—12.0 FTE positions.......................................................... 2,000,000

Federally qualified health center pilot.......................................................................................... 250,000

Felony drunk driver jail reduction and community treatment program....................................... 1,440,100

Goodwill Flip the Script............................................................................................................... 1,500,000

Offender success federal grants.................................................................................................... 751,000

Offender success community partners.......................................................................................... 14,500,000

Offender success programming.................................................................................................... 11,772,800

Public safety initiative.................................................................................................................. 4,000,000

Offender success services—69.0 FTE positions.......................................................................... 15,145,700

Residential probation diversions................................................................................................... 17,825,500

GROSS APPROPRIATION.......................................................................................................... $ 120,252,800

Appropriated from:

Federal revenues:

DOJ, prisoner reintegration.......................................................................................................... 751,000

Federal education funding............................................................................................................ 1,536,300

Special revenue funds:

Program and special equipment fund........................................................................................... 10,213,200

State general fund/general purpose.............................................................................................. $ 107,752,300

Sec. 104. FIELD OPERATIONS ADMINISTRATION

Full-time equated classified positions..........................................................................2,182.6

Criminal justice reinvestment....................................................................................................... $ 5,498,400

Detroit Detention Center—66.1 FTE positions............................................................................ 8,685,100

Detroit Reentry Center—236.0 FTE positions............................................................................. 29,989,600

Field operations—1,849.5 FTE positions..................................................................................... 215,083,300

Parole board operations—31.0 FTE positions.............................................................................. 3,727,300

Parole/probation services.............................................................................................................. 940,000

Residential alternative to prison program..................................................................................... 1,500,000

Substance abuse parole certain sanction program........................................................................ 1,440,000

Supervising region incentive program.......................................................................................... 1,000,000

GROSS APPROPRIATION.......................................................................................................... $ 267,863,700

Appropriated from:

Special revenue funds:

Local - community tether program reimbursement...................................................................... 275,000

Local revenues.............................................................................................................................. 8,685,100

Parole and probation oversight fees............................................................................................. 4,000,000

Parole and probation oversight fees set-aside.............................................................................. 940,000

Reentry center offender reimbursements...................................................................................... 10,000

Tether program participant contributions..................................................................................... 2,630,500

State general fund/general purpose.............................................................................................. $ 251,323,100

Sec. 105. CORRECTIONAL FACILITIES ADMINISTRATION

Full-time equated classified positions.............................................................................654.0

Central records—38.0 FTE positions........................................................................................... $ 4,446,300

Correctional facilities administration—24.0 FTE positions......................................................... 5,010,700

Housing inmates in federal institutions........................................................................................ 611,000

Inmate housing fund..................................................................................................................... 100

Inmate legal services.................................................................................................................... 490,900

Leased beds and alternatives to leased beds................................................................................ 100

Prison food service—352.0 FTE positions................................................................................... 70,342,800

Prison kitchen inspections............................................................................................................ 50,000

Prison store operations—33.0 FTE positions............................................................................... 3,282,600

Public works programs................................................................................................................. 1,000,000

Transportation—207.0 FTE positions.......................................................................................... 26,768,000

GROSS APPROPRIATION.......................................................................................................... $ 112,002,500

Appropriated from:

Federal revenues:

DOJ-BOP, federal prisoner reimbursement.................................................................................. 411,000

SSA-SSI, incentive payment........................................................................................................ 272,000

Special revenue funds:

Correctional industries revolving fund 110.................................................................................. 573,900

Public works user fees.................................................................................................................. 1,000,000

Resident stores.............................................................................................................................. 3,282,600

State general fund/general purpose.............................................................................................. $ 106,463,000

Sec. 106. HEALTH CARE

Full-time equated classified positions..........................................................................1,461.1

Clinical complexes—1,047.1 FTE positions................................................................................ $ 146,066,300

Health care administration—20.0 FTE positions......................................................................... 3,775,800

Healthy Michigan plan administration—12.0 FTE positions....................................................... 1,124,700

Hepatitis C treatment.................................................................................................................... 6,735,500

Interdepartmental grant to health and human services, eligibility specialists.............................. 119,700

Mental health services and support—376.0 FTE positions.......................................................... 45,981,100

Prisoner health care services........................................................................................................ 86,717,900

Substance abuse testing and treatment services—6.0 FTE positions........................................... 21,386,600

Vaccination program..................................................................................................................... 691,200

GROSS APPROPRIATION.......................................................................................................... $ 312,598,800

Appropriated from:

Federal revenues:

DOJ, Office of Justice programs, RSAT...................................................................................... 250,200

Federal revenues and reimbursements.......................................................................................... 385,200

Special revenue funds:

Prisoner health care copayments.................................................................................................. 257,200

State general fund/general purpose.............................................................................................. $ 311,706,200

Sec. 107. CORRECTIONAL FACILITIES

Average population........................................................................................................38,815

Full-time equated classified positions..........................................................................8,992.1

Alger Correctional Facility - Munising—259.0 FTE positions.................................................... $ 31,189,400

Baraga Correctional Facility - Baraga—293.8 FTE positions..................................................... 36,021,600

Bellamy Creek Correctional Facility - Ionia—391.2 FTE positions............................................ 45,003,600

Carson City Correctional Facility - Carson City—424.4 FTE positions..................................... 49,613,500

Central Michigan Correctional Facility - St. Louis—387.6 FTE positions................................. 47,009,300

Charles E. Egeler Correctional Facility - Jackson—387.6 FTE positions................................... 46,801,100

Chippewa Correctional Facility - Kincheloe—445.6 FTE positions............................................ 52,230,000

Cooper Street Correctional Facility - Jackson—262.1 FTE positions......................................... 30,325,000

Earnest C. Brooks Correctional Facility - Muskegon—245.2 FTE positions.............................. 30,604,700

G. Robert Cotton Correctional Facility - Jackson—393.0 FTE positions.................................... 45,634,700

Gus Harrison Correctional Facility - Adrian—443.6 FTE positions............................................ 50,857,600

Ionia Correctional Facility - Ionia—287.3 FTE positions........................................................... 34,886,000

Kinross Correctional Facility - Kincheloe—256.6 FTE positions............................................... 33,008,100

Lakeland Correctional Facility - Coldwater—276.4 FTE positions............................................. 33,619,700

Macomb Correctional Facility - New Haven—292.8 FTE positions........................................... 35,285,600

Marquette Branch Prison - Marquette—319.7 FTE positions...................................................... 38,697,200

Michigan Reformatory - Ionia—318.7 FTE positions................................................................. 36,034,000

Muskegon Correctional Facility - Muskegon—206.0 FTE positions........................................... 26,109,600

Newberry Correctional Facility - Newberry—198.1 FTE positions............................................. 24,673,000

Oaks Correctional Facility - Eastlake—289.4 FTE positions...................................................... 34,862,600

Ojibway Correctional Facility - Marenisco—201.1 FTE positions.............................................. 23,747,300

Parnall Correctional Facility - Jackson—264.1 FTE positions.................................................... 29,475,600

Richard A. Handlon Correctional Facility - Ionia—252.7 FTE positions................................... 30,762,400

Saginaw Correctional Facility - Freeland—275.9 FTE positions................................................ 33,835,800

Special Alternative Incarceration Program - Cassidy Lake—120.0 FTE positions..................... 14,179,300

St. Louis Correctional Facility - St. Louis—302.6 FTE positions............................................... 37,907,700

Thumb Correctional Facility - Lapeer—283.6 FTE positions..................................................... 33,809,700

Womens Huron Valley Correctional Complex - Ypsilanti—504.1 FTE positions....................... 60,568,400

Woodland Correctional Facility - Whitmore Lake—277.9 FTE positions................................... 33,169,100

Northern region administration and support—43.0 FTE positions.............................................. 4,336,300

Southern region administration and support—89.0 FTE positions.............................................. 20,430,900

Facility closure............................................................................................................................. (19,201,100)

GROSS APPROPRIATION.......................................................................................................... $ 1,065,487,700

Appropriated from:

Federal revenues:

DOJ, state criminal assistance program....................................................................................... 1,034,800

Special revenue funds:

State restricted fees, revenues, and reimbursements.................................................................... 102,100

State general fund/general purpose.............................................................................................. $ 1,064,350,800

Sec. 108. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Information technology services and projects.............................................................................. $ 30,583,400

GROSS APPROPRIATION.......................................................................................................... $ 30,583,400

Appropriated from:

Special revenue funds:

Correctional industries revolving fund 110.................................................................................. 178,600

Parole and probation oversight fees set-aside.............................................................................. 701,000

Program and special equipment fund........................................................................................... 444,000

State general fund/general purpose.............................................................................................. $ 29,259,800

Sec. 109. ONE-TIME APPROPRIATIONS

Higher custody level programming.............................................................................................. $ 2,400,000

New custody staff training........................................................................................................... 9,227,700

GROSS APPROPRIATION.......................................................................................................... $ 11,627,700

Appropriated from:

State general fund/general purpose.............................................................................................. $ 11,627,700

PART 2

PROVISIONS CONCERNING APPROPRIATIONS

FOR FISCAL YEAR 2018-2019

GENERAL SECTIONS

Sec. 201. Pursuant to section 30 of article IX of the state constitution of 1963, total state spending from state sources under part 1 for fiscal year 2018-2019 is $2,002,780,900.00 and state spending from state sources to be paid to local units of government for fiscal year 2018-2019 is $122,169,600.00. The itemized statement below identifies appropriations from which spending to local units of government will occur:

DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

County jail reimbursement program............................................................................................. $ 15,064,600

Community corrections comprehensive plans and services......................................................... 12,058,000

Felony drunk driver jail reduction and community treatment program....................................... 1,440,100

Field operations............................................................................................................................ 65,380,300

Leased beds and alternatives to leased beds................................................................................ 100

Prosecutorial and detainer expenses............................................................................................. 4,901,000

Public safety initiative.................................................................................................................. 4,000,000

Residential alternative to prison program..................................................................................... 1,500,000

Residential probation diversions................................................................................................... 17,825,500

TOTAL.......................................................................................................................................... $ 122,169,600

Sec. 202. The appropriations authorized under this part and part 1 are subject to the management and budget act, 1984 PA 431, MCL 18.1101 to 18.1594.

Sec. 203. As used in this part and part 1:

(a) “Administrative segregation” means confinement for maintenance of order or discipline to a cell or room apart from accommodations provided for inmates who are participating in programs of the facility.

(b) “Cost per prisoner” means the sum total of the funds appropriated under part 1 for the following, divided by the projected prisoner population in fiscal year 2018-2019:

(i) New custody staff training.

(ii) Education/skilled trades/career readiness programs.

(iii) Offender success programming.

(iv) Central records.

(v) Correctional facilities administration.

(vi) Inmate legal services.

(vii) Prison food service.

(viii) Prison store operations.

(ix) Transportation.

(x) Clinical complexes.

(xi) Hepatitis C treatment.

(xii) Mental health services and support.

(xiii) Prisoner health care services.

(xiv) Vaccination program.

(xv) Correctional facilities.

(xvi) Northern and southern region administration and support.

(xvii) Higher custody level programming.

(c) “Department” or “MDOC” means the Michigan department of corrections.

(d) “DOJ” means the United States Department of Justice.

(e) “DOJ-BOP” means the DOJ Bureau of Prisons.

(f) “EPIC program” means the department’s effective process improvement and communications program.

(g) “Evidence-based” means a decision-making process that integrates the best available research, clinician expertise, and client characteristics.

(h) “Federally qualified health center” means that term as defined in section 1396d(l)(2)(B) of the social security act, 42 USC 1396d.

(i) “FTE” means full-time equated.

(j) “Goal” means the intended or projected result of a comprehensive corrections plan or community corrections program to reduce repeat offending, criminogenic and high-risk behaviors, prison commitment rates, the length of stay in a jail, or to improve the utilization of a jail.

(k) “Jail” means a facility operated by a local unit of government for the physical detention and correction of persons charged with or convicted of criminal offenses.

(l) “MDHHS” means the Michigan department of health and human services.

(m) “Medicaid benefit” means a benefit paid or payable under a program for medical assistance under the social welfare act, 1939 PA 280, MCL 400.1 to 400.119b.

(n) “Objective risk and needs assessment” means an evaluation of an offender’s criminal history; the offender’s noncriminal history; and any other factors relevant to the risk the offender would present to the public safety, including, but not limited to, having demonstrated a pattern of violent behavior, and a criminal record that indicates a pattern of violent offenses.

(o) “OCC” means the office of community corrections.

(p) “Offender eligibility criteria” means particular criminal violations, state felony sentencing guidelines descriptors, and offender characteristics developed by advisory boards and approved by local units of government that identify the offenders suitable for community corrections programs funded through the office of community corrections.

(q) “Offender success” means that an offender has, with the support of the community, intervention of the field agent, and benefit of any participation in programs and treatment, made an adjustment while at liberty in the community such that he or she has not been sentenced to or returned to prison for the conviction of a new crime or the revocation of probation or parole.

(r) “Offender target populations” means felons or misdemeanants who would likely be sentenced to imprisonment in a state correctional facility or jail, who would not likely increase the risk to the public safety based on an objective risk and needs assessment that indicates that the offender can be safely treated and supervised in the community.

(s) “Offender who would likely be sentenced to imprisonment” means either of the following:

(i) A felon or misdemeanant who receives a sentencing disposition that appears to be in place of incarceration in a state correctional facility or jail, according to historical local sentencing patterns.

(ii) A currently incarcerated felon or misdemeanant who is granted early release from incarceration to a community corrections program or who is granted early release from incarceration as a result of a community corrections program.

(t) “Programmatic success” means that the department program or initiative has ensured that the offender has accomplished all of the following:

(i) Obtained employment, has enrolled or participated in a program of education or job training, or has investigated all bona fide employment opportunities.

(ii) Obtained housing.

(iii) Obtained a state identification card.

(u) “Recidivism” means that term as defined in section 1 of 2017 PA 5, MCL 798.31.

(v) “RSAT” means residential substance abuse treatment.

(w) “Serious emotional disturbance” means that term as defined in section 100d(2) of the mental health code, 1974 PA 258, MCL 330.1100d.

(x) “Serious mental illness” means that term as defined in section 100d(3) of the mental health code, 1974 PA 258, MCL 330.1100d.

(y) “SSA” means the United States Social Security Administration.

(z) “SSA-SSI” means SSA supplemental security income.

Sec. 204. The department shall use the internet to fulfill the reporting requirements of this part. This requirement may include transmission of reports via electronic mail to the recipients identified for each reporting requirement or it may include placement of reports on an internet or intranet site.

Sec. 205. Funds appropriated in part 1 shall not be used for the purchase of foreign goods or services, or both, if competitively priced and of comparable quality American goods or services, or both, are available. Preference shall be given to goods or services, or both, manufactured or provided by Michigan businesses, if they are competitively priced and of comparable quality. In addition, preference shall be given to goods or services, or both, that are manufactured or provided by Michigan businesses owned and operated by veterans, if they are competitively priced and of comparable quality.

Sec. 206. The department shall not take disciplinary action against an employee or a prisoner for communicating with a member of the legislature or his or her staff.

Sec. 207. The department shall prepare a report on out-of-state travel expenses not later than January 1 of each year. The travel report shall be a listing of all travel by classified and unclassified employees outside this state in the immediately preceding fiscal year that was funded in whole or in part with funds appropriated in the department’s budget. The report shall be submitted to the senate and house appropriations committees, the senate and house fiscal agencies, and the state budget office. The report shall include the following information:

(a) The dates of each travel occurrence.

(b) The total transportation and related costs of each travel occurrence, including the proportion funded with state general fund/general purpose revenues, the proportion funded with state restricted revenues, the proportion funded with federal revenues, and the proportion funded with other revenues.

Sec. 208. Funds appropriated in part 1 shall not be used by the department to hire a person to provide legal services that are the responsibility of the attorney general. This prohibition does not apply to legal services for bonding activities and for those outside services that the attorney general authorizes.

Sec. 209. Not later than November 30, the state budget office shall prepare and transmit a report that provides for estimates of the total general fund/general purpose appropriation lapses at the close of the prior fiscal year. This report shall summarize the projected year-end general fund/general purpose appropriation lapses by major departmental program or program areas. The report shall be transmitted to the chairpersons of the senate and house appropriations committees and the senate and house fiscal agencies.

Sec. 210. (1) In addition to the funds appropriated in part 1, there is appropriated an amount not to exceed $10,000,000.00 for federal contingency funds. These funds are not available for expenditure until they have been transferred to another line item in part 1 under section 393(2) of the management and budget act, 1984 PA 431, MCL 18.1393.

(2) In addition to the funds appropriated in part 1, there is appropriated an amount not to exceed $10,000,000.00 for state restricted contingency funds. These funds are not available for expenditure until they have been transferred to another line item in part 1 under section 393(2) of the management and budget act, 1984 PA 431, MCL 18.1393.

(3) In addition to the funds appropriated in part 1, there is appropriated an amount not to exceed $2,000,000.00 for local contingency funds. These funds are not available for expenditure until they have been transferred to another line item in part 1 under section 393(2) of the management and budget act, 1984 PA 431, MCL 18.1393.

(4) In addition to the funds appropriated in part 1, there is appropriated an amount not to exceed $2,000,000.00 for private contingency funds. These funds are not available for expenditure until they have been transferred to another line item in part 1 under section 393(2) of the management and budget act, 1984 PA 431, MCL 18.1393.

Sec. 211. The department shall cooperate with the department of technology, management, and budget to maintain a searchable website accessible by the public at no cost that includes, but is not limited to, all of the following for the department:

(a) Fiscal year-to-date expenditures by category.

(b) Fiscal year-to-date expenditures by appropriation unit.

(c) Fiscal year-to-date payments to a selected vendor, including the vendor name, payment date, payment amount, and payment description.

(d) The number of active department employees by job classification.

(e) Job specifications and wage rates.

Sec. 212. Within 14 days after the release of the executive budget recommendation, the department shall cooperate with the state budget office to provide the chairpersons of the senate and house appropriations committees, the chairpersons of the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, and the senate and house fiscal agencies with an annual report on estimated state restricted fund balances, state restricted fund projected revenues, and state restricted fund expenditures for the prior 2 fiscal years.

Sec. 213. The department shall maintain, on a publicly accessible website, a department scorecard that identifies, tracks, and regularly updates key metrics that are used to monitor and improve the department’s performance.

Sec. 214. Total authorized appropriations from all sources under part 1 for legacy costs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2019 are estimated at $319,141,800.00. From this amount, total department appropriations for pension-related legacy costs are estimated at $147,129,800.00. Total department appropriations for retiree health care legacy costs are estimated at $172,012,000.00.

Sec. 216. On a quarterly basis, the department shall report on the number of full-time equated positions in pay status by civil service classification to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office. This report shall include a detailed accounting of the long-term vacancies that exist within the department. As used in this section, “long-term vacancy” means any full-time equated position that has not been filled at any time during the past 24 calendar months.

Sec. 217. The department shall receive and retain copies of all reports funded from appropriations in part 1. Federal and state guidelines for short-term and long-term retention of records shall be followed. The department may electronically retain copies of reports unless otherwise required by federal and state guidelines.

Sec. 219. (1) Any contract for prisoner telephone services entered into after the effective date of this section shall include a condition that fee schedules for prisoner telephone calls, including rates and any surcharges other than those necessary to meet program and special equipment costs, be the same as fee schedules for calls placed from outside of correctional facilities.

(2) Revenues appropriated and collected for program and special equipment funds shall be considered state restricted revenue. Funding shall be used for prisoner programming, special equipment, and security projects. Unexpended funds remaining at the close of the fiscal year shall not lapse to the general fund but shall be carried forward and be available for appropriation in subsequent fiscal years.

(3) The department shall submit a report to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office by February 1 outlining revenues and expenditures from program and special equipment funds. The report shall include all of the following:

(a) A list of all individual projects and purchases financed with program and special equipment funds in the immediately preceding fiscal year, the amounts expended on each project or purchase, and the name of each vendor from which the products or services were purchased.

(b) A list of planned projects and purchases to be financed with program and special equipment funds during the current fiscal year, the amounts to be expended on each project or purchase, and the name of each vendor from which the products or services will be purchased.

(c) A review of projects and purchases planned for future fiscal years from program and special equipment funds.

Sec. 220. The department may charge fees and collect revenues in excess of appropriations in part 1 not to exceed the cost of offender services and programming, employee meals, parolee loans, academic/vocational services, custody escorts, compassionate visits, union steward activities, and public works programs and services provided to local units of government or private nonprofit organizations. The revenues and fees collected are appropriated for all expenses associated with these services and activities.

Sec. 239. It is the intent of the legislature that the department establish and maintain a management-to-staff ratio of not more than 1 supervisor for each 8 employees at the department’s central office in Lansing and at both the northern and southern region administration offices.

Sec. 247. In cooperation with the state court administrative office, the department shall assist with the data compilation for the swift and sure sanctions program.

Sec. 248. At the May 2019 consensus revenue estimating conference, the senate and house fiscal agencies and the state budget director, or state treasurer, shall establish a projected prisoner population for fiscal year 2019-2020, and a projected number of available beds based on the population projection.

DEPARTMENTAL ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPORT

Sec. 301. For 3 years after a felony offender is released from the department’s jurisdiction, the department shall maintain the offender’s file on the offender tracking information system and make it publicly accessible in the same manner as the file of the current offender. However, the department shall immediately remove the offender’s file from the offender tracking information system upon determination that the offender was wrongfully convicted and the offender’s file is not otherwise required to be maintained on the offender tracking information system.

Sec. 304. The department shall maintain a staff savings initiative program in conjunction with the EPIC program for employees to submit suggestions for efficiencies for the department. The department shall consider each suggestion in a timely manner. By March 1, the department shall report to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office on process improvements that were implemented based on suggestions that were recommended for implementation from the staff savings initiative and EPIC programs.

Sec. 305. From the funds appropriated in part 1 for prosecutorial and detainer expenses, the department shall reimburse counties for housing and custody of parole violators and offenders being returned by the department from community placement who are available for return to institutional status and for prisoners who volunteer for placement in a county jail.

Sec. 306. Funds included in part 1 for the sheriffs’ coordinating and training office are appropriated for and may be expended to defray costs of continuing education, certification, recertification, decertification, and training of local corrections officers, the personnel and administrative costs of the sheriffs’ coordinating and training office, the local corrections officers advisory board, and the sheriffs’ coordinating and training council under the local corrections officers training act, 2003 PA 125, MCL 791.531 to 791.546.

Sec. 307. The department shall issue a biannual report for all vendor contracts to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office. The report shall cover service contracts with a value of $500,000.00 or more and include all of the following:

(a) The original start date and the current expiration date of each contract.

(b) The number, if any, of contract compliance monitoring site visits completed by the department for each vendor.

(c) The number and amount of fines, if any, for service-level agreement noncompliance for each vendor broken down by area of noncompliance.

Sec. 308. The department shall provide for the training of all custody staff in effective and safe ways of handling prisoners with mental illness and referring prisoners to mental health treatment programs. Mental health awareness training shall be incorporated into the training of new custody staff.

Sec. 309. The department shall issue a report for all correctional facilities to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office by January 1 setting forth the following information for each facility: its name, street address, and date of construction; its current maintenance costs; any maintenance planned; its current utility costs; its expected future capital improvement costs; the current unspent balance of any authorized capital outlay projects, including the original authorized amount; and its expected future useful life.

Sec. 310. (1) By February 1, the department shall provide a report to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office which details the strategic plan of the department. The report shall contain strategies to decrease the overall recidivism rate, measurable plans to increase the rehabilitative function of correctional facilities, metrics to track and ensure prisoner readiness to reenter society, and constructive actions for providing prisoners with life skills development.

(2) The intent of this report is to express that the mission of the department is to provide an action plan before reentry to society that ensures prisoners’ readiness for meeting parole requirements and ensures a reduction in the total number of released inmates who reenter the criminal justice system.

Sec. 311. By December 1, the department shall provide a report on the Michigan state industries program to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office. The report shall include, but not be limited to, the locations of the programs, the total number of participants at each location, a description of job duties and typical inmate schedules, the products that are produced, and how the program provides marketable skills that lead to employable outcomes after release from a department facility.

Sec. 312. (1) From the funds appropriated in part 1 for budget and operations administration, $50,000.00 shall be used to conduct a comprehensive study of the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder and other psychological issues among correctional officers that are exacerbated by the corrections environment and exposure to highly stressful situations.

(2) By July 15, the department shall submit a report on the results of the study to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office.

OFFENDER SUCCESS ADMINISTRATION

Sec. 401. The department shall submit 3-year and 5-year prison population projection updates concurrent with submission of the executive budget recommendation to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office. The report shall include explanations of the methodology and assumptions used in developing the projection updates.

Sec. 402. By March 1, the department shall provide a report on offender success expenditures and allocations to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office. At a minimum, the report shall include information on both of the following:

(a) Details on prior-year expenditures, including amounts spent on each project funded, itemized by service provided and service provider.

(b) Allocations and planned expenditures for each project funded and for each project to be funded, itemized by service to be provided and service provider. The department shall provide an amended report quarterly, if any revisions to allocations or planned expenditures occurred during that quarter.

Sec. 403. The department shall partner with nonprofit faith-based, business and professional, civic, and community organizations for the purpose of providing inmate offender success services. Offender success services include, but are not limited to, counseling, providing information on housing and job placement, and money management assistance.

Sec. 404. From the funds appropriated in part 1 for offender success services, the department, when reasonably possible, shall ensure that inmates have potential employer matches in the communities to which they will return prior to each inmate’s initial parole hearing.

Sec. 405. By March 1, the department shall report to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office on substance abuse testing and treatment program objectives, outcome measures, and results, including program impact on offender success and programmatic success.

Sec. 406. The department will work with the organization representing federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) to implement a pilot project to ensure that behavioral and physical health needs among parolees and probationers are addressed. The pilot project will position FQHCs to ensure that parolees and probationers are enrolled in and maintain access to benefits for which they qualify, are linked to the health care services they need, follow up with providers, stay on their medications, are engaged in services, and have barriers to care addressed. The department will make necessary accommodations to perform the transition planning to allow for a direct referral to the FQHC organization to patients in relevant areas. The pilot project shall operate in at least Berrien, Kent, and Macomb Counties. The FQHC organization shall submit annual reports detailing these outcomes to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office. The report shall include, but not be limited to, the number of offenders served by the pilot project in each county, the number of individual contacts with each offender, the federally reimbursable expenditures leveraged by the pilot project by county, and the state expenditures within the pilot project by county.

Sec. 407. By June 30, the department shall place the statistical report from the immediately preceding calendar year on an internet site. The statistical report shall include, but not be limited to, the information as provided in the 2004 statistical report.

Sec. 408. The department shall measure the recidivism rates of offenders.

Sec. 409. (1) The department shall engage with the talent investment agency within the department of talent and economic development and local entities to design services and shall use appropriations provided in part 1 for offender success and vocational education programs. The department shall ensure that the collaboration provides relevant professional development opportunities to prisoners to ensure that the programs are high quality, demand driven, locally receptive, and responsive to the needs of communities where the prisoners are expected to reside after their release from correctional facilities. The programs shall begin upon the intake of the prisoner into a department facility.

(2) The department shall continue to offer workforce development programming through the entire duration of the prisoner’s incarceration to encourage employment upon release.

(3) By March 1, the department shall provide a report to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office detailing the results of the workforce development program.

Sec. 410. (1) The funds included in part 1 for community corrections comprehensive plans and services are to encourage the development through technical assistance grants, implementation, and operation of community corrections programs that enhance offender success and that also may serve as an alternative to incarceration in a state facility or jail. The comprehensive corrections plans shall include an explanation of how the public safety will be maintained, the goals for the local jurisdiction, offender target populations intended to be affected, offender eligibility criteria for purposes outlined in the plan, and how the plans will meet the following objectives, consistent with section 8(4) of the community corrections act, 1988 PA 511, MCL 791.408:

(a) Reduce admissions to prison of offenders who would likely be sentenced to imprisonment, including probation violators.

(b) Improve the appropriate utilization of jail facilities, the first priority of which is to open jail beds intended to house otherwise prison-bound felons, and the second priority being to appropriately utilize jail beds so that jail crowding does not occur.

(c) Open jail beds through the increase of pretrial release options.

(d) Reduce the readmission to prison of parole violators.

(e) Reduce the admission or readmission to prison of offenders, including probation violators and parole violators, for substance abuse violations.

(f) Contribute to offender success.

(2) The award of community corrections comprehensive plans and residential services funds shall be based on criteria that include, but are not limited to, the prison commitment rate by category of offenders, trends in prison commitment rates and jail utilization, historical trends in community corrections program capacity and program utilization, and the projected impact and outcome of annual policies and procedures of programs on offender success, prison commitment rates, and jail utilization.

(3) Funds awarded for residential probation diversions in part 1 shall provide for a per diem reimbursement of not more than $52.50.

Sec. 411. The comprehensive corrections plans shall also include, where appropriate, descriptive information on the full range of sanctions and services that are available and utilized within the local jurisdiction and an explanation of how jail beds, residential services, the special alternative incarceration program, probation detention centers, the electronic monitoring program for probationers, and treatment and rehabilitative services will be utilized to support the objectives and priorities of the comprehensive corrections plans and the purposes and priorities of section 8(4) of the community corrections act, 1988 PA 511, MCL 791.408, that contribute to the success of offenders. The plans shall also include, where appropriate, provisions that detail how the local communities plan to respond to sentencing guidelines found in chapter XVII of the code of criminal procedure, 1927 PA 175, MCL 777.1 to 777.69, and use the county jail reimbursement program under section 414 of this part. The state community corrections board shall encourage local community corrections advisory boards to include in their comprehensive corrections plans strategies to collaborate with local alcohol and drug treatment agencies of the MDHHS for the provision of alcohol and drug screening, assessment, case management planning, and delivery of treatment to alcohol- and drug-involved offenders.

Sec. 412. (1) As part of the March biannual report specified in section 12(2) of the community corrections act, 1988 PA 511, MCL 791.412, that requires an analysis of the impact of that act on prison admissions and jail utilization, the department shall submit to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office the following information for each county and counties consolidated for comprehensive corrections plans:

(a) Approved technical assistance grants and comprehensive corrections plans including each program and level of funding, the utilization level of each program, and profile information of enrolled offenders.

(b) If federal funds are made available, the number of participants funded, the number served, the number successfully completing the program, and a summary of the program activity.

(c) Status of the community corrections information system and the jail population information system.

(d) Data on residential services, including participant data, participant sentencing guideline scores, program expenditures, average length of stay, and bed utilization data.

(e) Offender disposition data by sentencing guideline range, by disposition type, by prior record variable score, by number and percent statewide and by county, current year, and comparisons to the previous 3 years.

(f) Data on the use of funding made available under the felony drunk driver jail reduction and community treatment program.

(2) The report required under subsection (1) shall include the total funding allocated, program expenditures, required program data, and year-to-date totals.

Sec. 414. (1) The department shall administer a county jail reimbursement program from the funds appropriated in part 1 for the purpose of reimbursing counties for housing in jails certain felons who otherwise would have been sentenced to prison.

(2) The county jail reimbursement program shall reimburse counties for convicted felons in the custody of the sheriff if the conviction was for a crime committed on or after January 1, 1999 and 1 of the following applies:

(a) The felon’s sentencing guidelines recommended range upper limit is more than 18 months, the felon’s sentencing guidelines recommended range lower limit is 12 months or less, the felon’s prior record variable score is 35 or more points, and the felon’s sentence is not for commission of a crime in crime class G or crime class H or a nonperson crime in crime class F under chapter XVII of the code of criminal procedure, 1927 PA 175, MCL 777.1 to 777.69.

(b) The felon’s minimum sentencing guidelines range minimum is more than 12 months under the sentencing guidelines described in subdivision (a).

(c) The felon was sentenced to jail for a felony committed while he or she was on parole and under the jurisdiction of the parole board and for which the sentencing guidelines recommended range for the minimum sentence has an upper limit of more than 18 months.

(3) State reimbursement under this subsection shall be $65.00 per diem per diverted offender for offenders with a presumptive prison guideline score, $55.00 per diem per diverted offender for offenders with a straddle cell guideline for a group 1 crime, and $40.00 per diem per diverted offender for offenders with a straddle cell guideline for a group 2 crime. Reimbursements shall be paid for sentences up to a 1-year total.

(4) As used in this section:

(a) “Group 1 crime” means a crime in 1 or more of the following offense categories: arson, assault, assaultive other, burglary, criminal sexual conduct, homicide or resulting in death, other sex offenses, robbery, and weapon possession as determined by the department based on specific crimes for which counties received reimbursement under the county jail reimbursement program in fiscal year 2007 and fiscal year 2008, and listed in the county jail reimbursement program document titled “FY 2007 and FY 2008 Group One Crimes Reimbursed”, dated March 31, 2009.

(b) “Group 2 crime” means a crime that is not a group 1 crime, including larceny, fraud, forgery, embezzlement, motor vehicle, malicious destruction of property, controlled substance offense, felony drunk driving, and other nonassaultive offenses.

(c) “In the custody of the sheriff” means that the convicted felon has been sentenced to the county jail and is either housed in a county jail, is in custody but is being housed at a hospital or medical facility for a medical or mental health purpose, or has been released from jail and is being monitored through the use of the sheriff’s electronic monitoring system.

(5) County jail reimbursement program expenditures shall not exceed the amount appropriated in part 1 for the county jail reimbursement program. Payments to counties under the county jail reimbursement program shall be made in the order in which properly documented requests for reimbursements are received. A request shall be considered to be properly documented if it meets MDOC requirements for documentation. By October 15, the department shall distribute the documentation requirements to all counties.

(6) Any county that receives funding under this section for the purpose of housing in jails certain felons who otherwise would have been sentenced to prison shall, as a condition of receiving the funding, report by September 30 an annual average jail capacity and annual average jail occupancy for the immediately preceding fiscal year.

(7) Not later than February 1, the department shall report to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections all of the following information:

(a) The number of inmates sentenced to the custody of the sheriff and eligible for the county jail reimbursement program.

(b) The total amount paid to counties under the county jail reimbursement program.

(c) The total number of days inmates were in the custody of the sheriff and eligible for the county jail reimbursement program.

(d) The number of inmates sentenced to the custody of the sheriff under each of the 3 categories: presumptive prison, group 1 crime, and group 2 crime in subsection (3).

(e) The total amount paid to counties under each of the 3 categories: presumptive prison, group 1 crime, and group 2 crime in subsection (3).

(f) The total number of days inmates were in the custody of the sheriff under each of the 3 categories: presumptive prison, group 1 crime, and group 2 crime in subsection (3).

(g) The estimated cost of housing inmates sentenced to the custody of the sheriff and eligible for the county jail reimbursement program as inmates of a state prison.

Sec. 416. Allowable uses of felony drunk driver jail reduction and community treatment program funding shall include reimbursing counties for transportation, treatment costs, and housing felony drunk drivers during a period of assessment for treatment and case planning. Reimbursements for housing during the assessment process shall be at the rate of $43.50 per day per offender, up to a maximum of 5 days per offender.

Sec. 417. (1) By March 1, the department shall report to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office on both of the following programs from the previous fiscal year:

(a) The felony drunk driver jail reduction and community treatment program.

(b) Any new initiatives to control prison population growth funded or proposed to be funded under part 1.

(2) For each program listed under subsection (1), the report shall include information on each of the following:

(a) Program objectives and outcome measures, including, but not limited to, the number of offenders who successfully completed the program, and the number of offenders who successfully remained in the community during the 3 years following termination from the program.

(b) Expenditures by location.

(c) The impact on jail utilization.

(d) The impact on prison admissions.

(e) Other information relevant to an evaluation of the program.

Sec. 418. (1) The department shall collaborate with the state court administrative office on facilitating changes to Michigan court rules that would require the court to collect at the time of sentencing the state operator’s license, state identification card, or other documentation used to establish the identity of the individual to be admitted to the department. The department shall maintain those documents in the prisoner’s personal file.

(2) The department shall cooperate with MDHHS to create and maintain a process by which prisoners can obtain their Michigan birth certificates if necessary. The department shall describe a process for obtaining birth certificates from other states, and in situations where the prisoner’s effort fails, the department shall assist in obtaining the birth certificate.

(3) The department shall collaborate with the department of military and veterans affairs to create and maintain a process by which prisoners can obtain a copy of their DD Form 214 or other military discharge documentation if necessary.

Sec. 419. (1) The department shall provide weekly electronic mail reports to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office on prisoner populations by security levels by facility, prison facility capacities, and parolee and probationer populations.

(2) The department shall provide monthly electronic mail reports to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office. The reports shall include information on end-of-month prisoner populations in county jails, the net operating capacity according to the most recent certification report, identified by date, the number of beds in currently closed housing units by facility, and end-of-month data, year-to-date data, and comparisons to the prior year for the following:

(a) Community residential program populations, separated by centers and electronic monitoring.

(b) Parole populations.

(c) Probation populations, with identification of the number in special alternative incarceration.

(d) Prison and camp populations, with separate identification of the number in special alternative incarceration and the number of lifers.

(e) Prisoners classified as past their earliest release date.

(f) Parole board activity, including the numbers and percentages of parole grants and parole denials.

(g) Prisoner exits, identifying transfers to community placement, paroles from prisons and camps, paroles from community placement, total movements to parole, prison intake, prisoner deaths, prisoners discharging on the maximum sentence, and other prisoner exits.

(h) Prison intake and returns, including probation violators, new court commitments, violators with new sentences, escaper new sentences, total prison intake, returns from court with additional sentences, community placement returns, technical parole violator returns, and total returns to prison and camp.

Sec. 421. (1) Funds appropriated in part 1 for the substance abuse parole certain sanction program shall be distributed to an American Correctional Association accredited rehabilitation organization operating in any of the following counties: Berrien, Calhoun, Genesee, Kalamazoo, Kent, Macomb, Muskegon, Oakland, Saginaw, and Wayne for operations and administration of the program. The program may be utilized as a condition of parole for technical parole violators to ensure public safety and justice through a program based on evidence-based tactics and programs.

(2) The program or programs selected shall report by March 30 to the department, the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office. The report shall include program performance measurements, the number of individuals who participate in the program, the number of individuals who return to prison after participating, and outcomes of participants who complete the program.

Sec. 422. On a quarterly basis, the department shall issue a report to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office, for the previous 4 quarters detailing the outcomes of prisoners who have been reviewed for parole. The report shall include all of the following:

(a) How many prisoners in each quarter were reviewed.

(b) How many prisoners were granted parole.

(c) How many prisoners were denied parole.

(d) How many parole decisions were deferred.

(e) The distribution of the total number of prisoners reviewed during that quarter grouped by whether the prisoner had been interviewed for the first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, or more than sixth time.

(f) The number of paroles granted, denied, or deferred for each of the parole guideline scores of low, average, and high.

(g) The reason for denying or deferring parole.

Sec. 423. From the funds appropriated in part 1 for offender success administration, the department shall collaborate with the Michigan Restaurant Association for job placement for individuals on probation and parole.

Sec. 425. (1) From the funds appropriated in part 1 for offender success programming, $1,000,000.00 shall be used by the department to establish medication-assisted treatment offender success pilot programs to provide prerelease treatment and postrelease referral for opioid-addicted and alcohol-addicted offenders who voluntarily participate in the medication-assisted treatment offender success pilot programs. The department shall collaborate with residential and nonresidential substance abuse treatment providers and with community-based clinics to provide postrelease treatment. The programs shall employ a multifaceted approach to treatment, including a long-acting nonaddictive medication approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of opioid and alcohol dependence, counseling, and postrelease referral to community-based providers.

(2) The manufacturer of a long-acting nonaddictive medication approved by the Food and Drug Administration for opioid and alcohol dependence shall provide the department with samples of the medication, at no cost to the department, during the duration of the medication-assisted treatment offender success pilot programs. Offenders shall receive 1 injection prior to being released from custody and shall be connected with an aftercare plan and assistance with obtaining insurance to cover subsequent injections.

(3) Participants of the programs shall be required to attend substance abuse treatment programming as directed by their agent, including coordination of both direct or indirect services through federally qualified health centers in Wayne, Washtenaw, Genesee, Berrien, Van Buren, and Allegan Counties, but not limited to only those counties, shall be subject to routine drug and alcohol testing, shall not be allowed to consume drugs or alcohol, and shall possess a strong will to overcome addiction.

(4) The department shall submit a report by September 30 to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office on the number of offenders who received injections upon release, the number of offenders who received injections and tested positive for drugs or alcohol, the number of offenders who received injections in the community for a duration of at least 3 months, and the number of offenders who received injections and were subsequently returned to prison.

Sec. 426. From the funds appropriated in part 1, the department shall ensure that any inmate with a diagnosed mental illness is referred to a local mental health care provider that is able and willing to treat the inmate upon parole or discharge. The department shall ensure that the provider is informed of the inmate’s current treatment plan including any medications that are currently prescribed to the inmate.

Sec. 437. (1) Funds appropriated in part 1 for Goodwill Flip the Script shall be distributed to a Michigan-chartered 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation operating in a county with greater than 1,500,000 people for administration and expansion of a program which serves a population of persons aged 16 to 39. The program shall target those who are entering the criminal justice system for the first or second time and shall assist those individuals through the following program types:

(a) Alternative sentencing programs in partnership with a local district or circuit court.

(b) Educational recovery for special adult populations with high rates of illiteracy.

(c) Career development and continuing education for women.

(2) The program selected shall report by March 30 to the department, the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office. The report shall include program performance measurements, the number of individuals diverted from incarceration, the number of individuals served, and outcomes of participants who complete the program.

FIELD OPERATIONS ADMINISTRATION

Sec. 602. The funds appropriated in part 1 for the supervising region incentive program shall be used only to fund an incentive program for field operations administration regions in accordance with the supervising region incentive act, 2017 PA 11, MCL 791.131 to 791.137.

Sec. 603. (1) All prisoners, probationers, and parolees involved with the curfew monitoring program shall reimburse the department for costs associated with their participation in the program. The department may require community service work reimbursement as a means of payment for those able-bodied individuals unable to pay for the costs of the equipment.

(2) Program participant contributions and local program reimbursement for the curfew monitoring program appropriated in part 1 are related to program expenditures and may be used to offset expenditures for this purpose.

(3) Included in the appropriation in part 1 is adequate funding to implement the curfew monitoring program to be administered by the department. The curfew monitoring program is intended to provide sentencing judges and county sheriffs in coordination with local community corrections advisory boards access to the state’s curfew monitoring program to reduce prison admissions and improve local jail utilization. The department shall determine the appropriate distribution of the curfew monitor units throughout the state based upon locally developed comprehensive corrections plans under the community corrections act, 1988 PA 511, MCL 791.401 to 791.414.

(4) For a fee determined by the department, the department shall provide counties with the curfew monitor equipment, replacement parts, administrative oversight of the equipment’s operation, notification of violators, and periodic reports regarding county program participants. Counties are responsible for curfew monitor equipment installation and service. For an additional fee as determined by the department, the department shall provide staff to install and service the equipment. Counties are responsible for the coordination and apprehension of program violators.

(5) Any county with curfew monitor charges outstanding over 60 days shall be considered in violation of the community curfew monitor program agreement and lose access to the program.

Sec. 604. (1) The funds appropriated in part 1 for criminal justice reinvestment shall be used only to fund data collection and evidence-based programs designed to reduce recidivism among probationers and parolees.

(2) Of the funds appropriated in part 1 for criminal justice reinvestment, at least $600,000.00 shall be allocated to an organization that has received a United States Department of Labor training to work 2-adult reentry grant to provide county jail inmates with programming and services to prepare them to get and keep jobs. Examples of eligible programs and services are, but are not limited to: adult education, tutoring, manufacturing skills training, participation in a simulated work environment, mentoring, cognitive therapy groups, life skills classes, substance abuse recovery groups, fatherhood programs, classes in understanding the legal system, family literacy, health and wellness, finance management, employer presentations, and classes on job retention. Programming and support services should begin before release and continue after release from the county jail. To be eligible for funding, an organization must show at least 2 years’ worth of data that demonstrate program success.

Sec. 611. The department shall prepare by March 1 individual reports for the residential reentry program, the electronic monitoring program, and the special alternative to incarceration program. The reports shall be submitted to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office. Each program’s report shall include information on all of the following:

(a) Monthly new participants by type of offender. Residential reentry program participants shall be categorized by reason for placement. For technical rule violators, the report shall sort offenders by length of time since release from prison, by the most recent violation, and by the number of violations occurring since release from prison.

(b) Monthly participant unsuccessful terminations, including cause.

(c) Number of successful terminations.

(d) End month population by facility/program.

(e) Average length of placement.

(f) Return to prison statistics.

(g) Description of each program location or locations, capacity, and staffing.

(h) Sentencing guideline scores and actual sentence statistics for participants, if applicable.

(i) Comparison with prior year statistics.

(j) Analysis of the impact on prison admissions and jail utilization and the cost effectiveness of the program.

Sec. 612. (1) The department shall review and revise as necessary policy proposals that provide alternatives to prison for offenders being sentenced to prison as a result of technical probation violations and technical parole violations. To the extent the department has insufficient policies or resources to affect the continued increase in prison commitments among these offender populations, the department shall explore other policy options to allow for program alternatives, including department or OCC-funded programs, local level programs, and programs available through private agencies that may be used as prison alternatives for these offenders.

(2) By April 1, the department shall provide a report to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office on the number of all parolees returned to prison and probationers sentenced to prison for either a technical violation or new sentence during the preceding fiscal year. The report shall include the following information for probationers, for parolees after their first parole, and for parolees who have been paroled more than once:

(a) The numbers of parole and probation violators returned to or sent to prison for a new crime with a comparison of original versus new offenses by major offense type: assaultive, nonassaultive, drug, and sex.

(b) The numbers of parole and probation violators returned to or sent to prison for a technical violation and the type of violation, including, but not limited to, zero gun tolerance and substance abuse violations. For parole technical rule violators, the report shall list violations by type, by length of time since release from prison, by the most recent violation, and by the number of violations occurring since release from prison.

(c) The educational history of those offenders, including how many had a high school equivalency or high school diploma prior to incarceration in prison, how many received a high school equivalency while in prison, and how many received a vocational certificate while in prison.

(d) The number of offenders who participated in the reentry program versus the number of those who did not.

(e) The unduplicated number of offenders who participated in substance abuse treatment programs, mental health treatment programs, or both, while in prison, itemized by diagnosis.

Sec. 615. (1) The department shall submit a report detailing the number of prisoners who have received life imprisonment sentences with the possibility of parole and who are currently eligible for parole to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office by April 30.

(2) The report shall include the following information on parolable lifers who have served more than 25 years: prisoner name, MDOC identification number, prefix, offense for which life term is being served, county of conviction, age at time offense was committed, current age, race, gender, true security classification, dates of parole board file reviews, dates of parole board interviews, parole guideline scores, and reason for decision not to release.

Sec. 617. From the funds appropriated in part 1 for the residential alternative to prison program, the department shall provide vocational, educational, and cognitive programming in a secure environment to enhance existing alternative sentencing options, increase employment readiness and successful placement rates, and reduce new criminal behavior for the west Michigan probation violator population. The department shall measure and set the following metric goals:

(a) 85% of participants successfully complete the program.

(b) Of the participants that complete the program, 75% will earn a nationally recognized credential for career and vocational programs.

(c) Of the participants that complete the program, 100% will earn a certificate of completion for cognitive programming.

(d) The prison commitment rate for probation violators will be reduced by 5% within the impacted geographical area after the first year of program operation.

HEALTH CARE

Sec. 802. As a condition of expenditure of the funds appropriated in part 1, the department shall provide the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office with quarterly reports on physical and mental health care detailing quarterly and fiscal year-to-date expenditures itemized by vendor, allocations, status of payments from contractors to vendors, and projected year-end expenditures from accounts for prisoner health care, mental health care, pharmaceutical services, and durable medical equipment. These reports shall include a breakdown of all payments to the integrated care provider itemized by physical health care, mental health care, and pharmacy expenditures.

Sec. 803. (1) The department shall assure that all prisoners, upon any health care treatment, are given the opportunity to sign a release of information form designating a family member or other individual to whom the department shall release records information regarding a prisoner. A release of information form signed by a prisoner shall remain in effect for 1 year, and the prisoner may elect to withdraw or amend the release form at any time.

(2) The department shall assure that any such signed release forms follow a prisoner upon transfer to another department facility or to the supervision of a parole officer.

(3) The form shall be placed online, on a public website managed by the department.

Sec. 804. The department shall report quarterly to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office on prisoner health care utilization. The report shall include the number of inpatient hospital days, outpatient visits, emergency room visits, and prisoners receiving off-site inpatient medical care in the previous quarter, by facility.

Sec. 807. The funds appropriated in part 1 for Hepatitis C treatment shall be used only to purchase specialty medication for Hepatitis C treatment in the prison population. In addition to the above appropriation, any rebates received from the medications used shall be used only to purchase specialty medication for Hepatitis C treatment. On a quarterly basis, the department shall issue a report to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office, showing for the previous 4 quarters the total amount spent on specialty medication for the treatment of Hepatitis C, the number of prisoners that were treated, the amount of any rebates that were received from the purchase of specialty medication, and what outstanding rebates are expected to be received.

Sec. 812. (1) The department shall provide the department of health and human services with a monthly list of prisoners newly committed to the department of corrections. The department and the department of health and human services shall enter into an interagency agreement under which the department of health and human services provides the department of corrections with monthly lists of newly committed prisoners who are eligible for Medicaid benefits in order to maintain the process by which Medicaid benefits are suspended rather than terminated. The department shall assist prisoners who may be eligible for Medicaid benefits after release from prison with the Medicaid enrollment process prior to release from prison.

(2) The department shall provide the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office with quarterly updates on the utilization of Medicaid benefits for prisoners.

Sec. 816. By April 1, the department shall provide the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office with a report on pharmaceutical expenditures and prescribing practices. In particular, the report shall provide the following information:

(a) A detailed accounting of expenditures on antipsychotic medications.

(b) Any changes that have been made to the prescription drug formularies.

CORRECTIONAL FACILITIES ADMINISTRATION

Sec. 901. From the funds appropriated in part 1 for the enhanced food technology program, the department shall expand the existing food technology education program to at least 700 inmates annually. A participant in the food technology program shall complete 408 hours of on-the-job training in a prison kitchen as a part of the program.

Sec. 902. All inmates working in prison kitchens shall complete the minimum requirements for a ServSafe Food Handler certificate before being allowed to work in the kitchens. Requirements shall be met by using online materials unless the department determines the program would be best served by using other materials. Current prison kitchen workers shall complete the requirements for a ServSafe Food Handler certificate on or before April 1, to maintain eligibility to work in a prison kitchen.

Sec. 903. (1) All department-operated prisoner food service operations shall be annually inspected to ensure they meet food safety standards established for food service establishments under the food law, 2000 PA 92, MCL 289.1101 to 289.8111, or for food service establishments under the 2001 food code published by the Food and Drug Administration of the Public Health Service of the Department of Health and Human Services. Funds appropriated in part 1 for prison kitchen inspections shall be used for costs to implement this section and for inspecting prison food service operations.

(2) Nothing in this section shall be construed to remove the exemption under section 1107(p) of the food law, 2000 PA 92, MCL 289.1107.

Sec. 903a. From the funds appropriated in part 1 for prison food service, the department shall report biannually to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office on the following:

(a) Average per-meal cost for prisoner food service. Per-meal cost shall include all costs directly related to the provision of food for the prisoner population, and shall include, but not be limited to, actual food costs, total compensation for all food service workers, including benefits and legacy costs, and inspection and compliance costs for food service.

(b) Food service-related contracts, including goods or services to be provided and the vendor.

(c) Major sanitation violations.

Sec. 904. The department shall calculate the per prisoner/per day cost for each prisoner security custody level. This calculation shall include all actual direct and indirect costs for the previous fiscal year, including, but not limited to, the value of services provided to the department by other state agencies and the allocation of statewide legacy costs. To calculate the per prisoner/per day costs, the department shall divide these direct and indirect costs by the average daily population for each custody level. For multilevel facilities, the indirect costs that cannot be accurately allocated to each custody level can be included in the calculation on a per-prisoner basis for each facility. A report summarizing these calculations and the direct and indirect costs included in them shall be submitted to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office not later than December 15.

Sec. 905. (1) From the funds appropriated in part 1 for leased beds and alternatives to leased beds, the department may implement a county jail bed program to house eligible prisoners sentenced to the custody of the department in county jails rather than in state correctional facilities.

(2) A county may volunteer to participate in the county jail bed program and house eligible prisoners sentenced to the custody of the department in its county jails.

(3) If a county participating in the county jail bed program has available bed space in its county jail and the department has prisoners in its custody meeting the eligibility requirements under this section, the department may place the eligible prisoners in the county jail.

(4) A prisoner shall meet all of the following eligibility requirements to be placed in a county jail under this section:

(a) The prisoner has been given a level I classification by a department classification committee on a scale of 6 levels in which level I is the least restrictive level.

(b) The prisoner is not serving a sentence for conviction of a violation or attempted violation of section 520b, 520c, 520d, 520e, or 520g of the Michigan penal code, 1931 PA 328, MCL 750.520b, 750.520c, 750.520d, 750.520e, and 750.520g.

(c) The prisoner is serving a fixed sentence with a determined discharge date.

Sec. 906. Any local unit of government or private nonprofit organization that contracts with the department for public works services shall be responsible for financing the entire cost of such an agreement.

Sec. 907. The department shall report by March 1 to the senate and house appropriations subcommittees on corrections, the senate and house fiscal agencies, the legislative corrections ombudsman, and the state budget office on academic and vocational programs. The report shall provide information relevant to an assessment of the department’s academic and vocational programs, including, but not limited to, all of the following:

(a) The number of instructors and the number of instructor vacancies, by program and facility.

(b) The number of prisoners enrolled in each program, the number of prisoners completing each program, the number of prisoners who do not complete each program and are not subsequently reenrolled, and the reason for not completing the program, the number of prisoners transferred to another facility while enrolled in a program and not subsequently reenrolled, the number of prisoners enrolled who are repeating the program, and the number of prisoners on waiting lists for each program, all itemized by facility.

(c) The steps the department has undertaken to improve programs, track records, accommodate transfers and prisoners with health care needs, and reduce waiting lists.

(d) The number of prisoners paroled without a high school diploma and the number of prisoners paroled without a high school equivalency.

(e) An explanation of the value and purpose of each program, for example, to improve employability, reduce recidivism, reduce prisoner idleness, or some combination of these and other factors.

(f) An identification of program outcomes fo